Teasing the Korean

Sales and Distribution of Jazz LPs, circa 1948-1964

105 posts in this topic

2 minutes ago, Teasing the Korean said:

I consider live gigs to be merely way for the jazz musician to get paid and stay in practice between recording sessions.  

There are those type of musicians, sure. But there are others for whom that equation is completely reversed, recording is just a necessity of commerce, and not even then an absolute necessity.

Of course, that's 20th Century. Now that we double down on the concept of communal narcissism...  I Record, Therefore I Am...yuck.

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15 minutes ago, JSngry said:

There are those type of musicians, sure. But there are others for whom that equation is completely reversed, recording is just a necessity of commerce, and not even then an absolute necessity.

Yes, I understand this.  I am trying to separate the musician's in-the-moment intention from actual accomplishment in terms of what we may hear and enjoy and assess.  We know there were all kinds of musical and cultural moments that were not recorded.   We can trace influence, and we can read accounts by the people who were there.  But those are subject to hype, just like the hype stickers that record labels use.  

Edited by Teasing the Korean

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Absolutely.

My thing is to talk to all the old, crazy, and old crazy people you can find, and then bump what they say up against the hype of the ownership and aspirational ownership classes. That means finding them and then just sitting up and listening, no matter what.

As much of a challenge ( mostly to The Ego Of Now) that can be, the truth almost always will almost be in there somewhere. It's never in ownership' interest to not hype, and true genesis creates itself organically. But both are how we get to the point of both truth and reality 

And that's what I love about Anthony Braxton's long game, he's taken it upon himself to take on both of these roles, lest there be no misunderstanding, then, now, and next

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6 hours ago, JSngry said:

That live So What was not from the KOB recording session. It was some CBS TV show. 

Yes. That's my point.  I guess I should have said between the 2 sessions done for the record. but people didi get to hear it before the record was released. 

Edited by medjuck

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Which maybe raises the question - did Gil already have that into transcribed and written/orchestrated that soon after the recording session, or did Bill get it from Gil, or just what was that intro all about anyway?

11 minutes ago, medjuck said:

Yes. That's my point.  I guess I should have said between the 2 sessions done for the record. but people didi get to hear it before the record was released. 

Not really...https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Herridge

Herridge produced and hosted The Robert Herridge Theater, a half-hour dramatic anthology that ran in syndication circa 1959-1960[3] or in 1961[4] (sources vary), primarily on educational television stations.[4] One edition, "The Sound of Miles Davis", which Herridge referred to onscreen as "a story told in the language of music", consisted of an April 2, 1959, jazz concert by Davis, John Coltrane, Wynton Kelly, Paul Chambers, Jimmy Cobb, and the Gil Evans Orchestra at CBS TV's Studio 61. It aired July 21, 1960.[5][6]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kind_of_Blue

Kind of Blue is a studio album by American jazz trumpeter-composer Miles Davis. It was recorded on March 2 and April 22, 1959, at Columbia's 30th Street Studio in New York City, and released on August 17 of that year by Columbia Records.

So back to the original point, yes, knowing a release date certainly does provide critical data, although more about product than actual music,

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