Durium

BFT #61

115 posts in this topic

kerstband.jpg

Love to wish you all a warm Xmas ..................

The discussion of BFT # 61 will start on Saturday the 27th of December 2008. You´re invited to participate. Enjoy listening !!

Keep (it) Swinging in 2009

Durium

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SOMETHING OLD SOMETHING NEW

KEEP (IT) SWINGING

BFT # 61

You're invited to start the discussion for BFT # 61.

Keep swinging

Durium

Edited by Durium

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Drat! My notes are at the office. Will post them on Monday!

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Lots of head-scratching going on over here.. :rlol

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some of this is great stuff. thanks, durium! some brief notes upon first & second listen. instead of just trying to guess (which i'm terrible at), i'll ramble on and on (which i'm excellent at) and give some highly subjective ratings out of five.

1. "looking good, but feeling bad", a modern recording. could be bratislava hot serenaders--did they record it? singer doesn't sound like a native english speaker, so i don't think it's one of dean mora's things. ondrej havelka is a little sweeter, usually. good track. 4/5 another thought: could be the dsc. i can't tell whether that's a dutch accent, because the guy is distorting his voice so much.

2. our hero is walking through the fog or rain, after his partner has been shot and the dame has disappeared. wouldn't be out of place on one of those "jazz after midnight" discs. no idea who this is. 1/5

3. some modern guitar bad-ass, i guess. parts sound classical, parts are flamenco-ish, and a lot of it feels like a 60's folk song somehow. 2/5

4. drummer is annoying. his brushing starts and ends abruptly. 1/5 oh, it gets livelier in the middle. and it sounds like a live recording. pianist can keep his job. drummer's fired.

5. 1/5

6. this reminds me of dave van ronk in style, though not in sound. fun stuff. that sounds like a ukelele, but for once played like almost a real instrument. so that's good. 3/5

7. judging by the recording quality, some modern gypsy band. i like it. is that a vibe hit at the very end? 4/5

8. too broadway-y for my taste. 2/5

9. "sugar foot stomp"/"dippermouth blues" at quite a relaxed tempo. i could take wild stabs in the dark, but really i don't know who this is. very new orleans. i like it. 4/5

10. latin beat into "salt peanuts". whatever. 2/5

11. "jumpin' at the woodside"--or at least, that's what the riff sounds like at the beginning, but then it's gone. sounds like two pianos at times, but is probably just one. basie & peterson played closer to the melody and with more breathing room. i don't think it's tatum, but perhaps it's teddy wilson? more, please! 4/5

12. two basses? really? i have no idea who this is. they get 3/5 for novelty.

13. krupa he is not. a minute in, and there's no music to be heard yet. ah, a piano. i don't like this at all. 0/5

14. 1/5

15. reminds me of quincy jones, maybe because of the era it was arranged in? film music. (actually, a lot of this stuff sounds fairly film sountrack-ish to me.) 1/5

16. "our love is here to stay", played by two trombones! is there a hidden two instrument theme?

17. 0/5

18. "looking at the world through rose-coloured glasses". 2/5

19. six seconds (i assume that's the right length) of jabbo and a rubber ducky. no, i have no idea. it's not bix and it's not armstrong, but i can't tell you more than that. i listened to it twenty times, though. :o)

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some of this is great stuff. thanks, durium! some brief notes upon first & second listen. instead of just trying to guess (which i'm terrible at), i'll ramble on and on (which i'm excellent at) and give some highly subjective ratings out of five.

Thank you Alex for starting the discussion.

1. "looking good, but feeling bad", a modern recording. could be bratislava hot serenaders--did they record it? singer doesn't sound like a native english speaker, so i don't think it's one of dean mora's things. ondrej havelka is a little sweeter, usually. good track. 4/5 another thought: could be the dsc. i can't tell whether that's a dutch accent, because the guy is distorting his voice so much.

Of course the title is correct: Lookin' Good, But Feelin' Bad You're right - the singer is not a native English speaker, and not a Dutch man. Non of the suggested names.

4. drummer is annoying. his brushing starts and ends abruptly. 1/5 oh, it gets livelier in the middle. and it sounds like a live recording. pianist can keep his job. drummer's fired.

It is a live recording. The drummer never made it, you're right - his name is even unknown to me.

6. this reminds me of dave van ronk in style, though not in sound. fun stuff. that sounds like a ukelele, but for once played like almost a real instrument. so that's good.

Dave Van Ronk could be, but it isn't. You're right about the uke.

7. judging by the recording quality, some modern gypsy band. i like it. is that a vibe hit at the very end?

It's a modern "gypsy" band. Did you mean that you heard a vibraphone at the end? Well, there is no vibraphone.

9. "sugar foot stomp"/"dippermouth blues" at quite a relaxed tempo. i could take wild stabs in the dark, but really i don't know who this is. very new orleans. i like it

Of course it's the Dippermouth Blues And I agree it sounds very New Orleans, but the origin of this band is not New Orleans at all .................. It will surprise you!

10. latin beat into "salt peanuts". whatever

Salt Peanuts is ok.

11. "jumpin' at the woodside"--or at least, that's what the riff sounds like at the beginning, but then it's gone. sounds like two pianos at times, but is probably just one. basie & peterson played closer to the melody and with more breathing room. i don't think it's tatum, but perhaps it's teddy wilson? more, please!

Well, a lot of names - a lot of suggestions ................... I guess let's wait for some more discussion about that.

12. two basses? really?

Sure !!

15. reminds me of quincy jones, maybe because of the era it was arranged in? film music. (actually, a lot of this stuff sounds fairly film sountrack-ish to me.)

No Quincy Jones. The tune might have originally been used as film music, but not this version.

16. "our love is here to stay", played by two trombones! is there a hidden two instrument theme?

The title is correct: Love Is Here To Stay And there are two bones indeed. I don't know what you mean with the suggestion of a hidden two instrument theme? You mean a counter melody?

18. "looking at the world through rose-coloured glasses".

The title was not the most difficult part of this one: you're correct Looking At The World Through Rose-Colered Glasses, but who's the vocalist?

19. six seconds (i assume that's the right length) of jabbo and a rubber ducky. no, i have no idea. it's not bix and it's not armstrong, but i can't tell you more than that. i listened to it twenty times, though. :o)

The complete tune is, indeed, six seconds, although I skipped the intro, which is the spoken title of the tune. Good that you recognized the rubber ducky, although the information doesn't tell if it was a ducky - it even might be a rubber Christmas tree or what so ever. I don't know, but it made the noise.

Thanks Alex - I hope my remarks help you to listen and re-listen again. Maybe some comments helped you.

Keep swinging

Durium

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Track 2 - 'When You Wish Upon A Star'. That sweet-sounding altoist has got to be Frank Morgan and the pianist sounds very much like George Cables. So I'll go for This One

Edited by sidewinder

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Track 2 - 'When You Wish Upon A Star'. That sweet-sounding altoist has got to be Frank Morgan and the pianist sounds very much like George Cables. So I'll go for This One

Congratulations Sidewinder.

2. (2:02)

morgan-cd.jpg

FRANK MORGAN - A LOVESOME THING

FRANK MORGAN QUARTET

frankmorgan03.jpg

Frank Morgan as ss - George Cables p - David Williams b - Lewis Nash dm.

When You Wish Upon A Star (Harline-Washington-Porter)

Recorded New York City, 5th - 6th of September, 1990 ( Antilles 422.848 213)

FrankMorgan%20autograph.jpg

I heard Frank Morgan playing in one of his last concerts before he passed away a year ago. A very nice man with a great sound. Peace and Love he wrote above his autograph.

A Lovesome Thing | The concert | Pictures made during the concert | Frank Morgan ( 1933-2007)

Keep swinging

Durium

Edited by Durium

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I heard Frank Morgan playing in one of his last concerts before he passed away a year ago. A very nice man with a great sound. Peace and Love he wrote above his autograph.

Fantastic ! I always regret never having seen him play. It was indeed a miracle that he came back and made all of that great music after so many 'lost' years. For sure a great man.

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Track 14 says to me 'Hank Jones'. The tune is an old bebop classic but the name eludes me. The precise and 'finnickity' chordal keyboard style (meant in a VERY good way I might add) says Hank Jones to me. If so, one of his more recent recordings.

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this is a wonderful BFT!!!! i have played it 3 times in a row already!!!!

much thanks!!!

:excited:

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Track 14 says to me 'Hank Jones'. The tune is an old bebop classic but the name eludes me. The precise and 'finnickity' chordal keyboard style (meant in a VERY good way I might add) says Hank Jones to me. If so, one of his more recent recordings.

No, it's not Hank Jones and the tune was written by the pianist himself and so, NOT an old bebop classic.

Keep swinging

Durium

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this is a wonderful BFT!!!! i have played it 3 times in a row already!!!!

much thanks!!!

:excited:

Thank you for the nice words ................. and nice picture. I like both :excited:

Keep swinging

Durium

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Fun stuff. I liked much of it, some of it, less so.

1 - No clue. Not my bag, baby.

2 - Disney Theme (When You Wish Upon A Star). No idea who, maybe Frank Morgan.

3 - John Lewis' Django. No idea who this is. I want to like it, but it bugs me.

4 - Know the tune, but can't put a name to it. Shit... I know this recording -- I have this. Shades of Hank Jones, maybe, but I'm leaning towards Vince Guiraldi. If I don't have it, I want it! Why doesn't anybody play like this anymore?

5 - Don't know the tune or the players. I like it as a one off, but not sure I could listen to a whole album of this. This would be fun to see out in a social venue.

6 - No idea, not my t'ing.

7 - If it isn't Billy Bang or Michael White, I'm not likely to get a violin player! ;) I say this isn't my bag, but I used to run into a guy at a lot of jam sessions who played this sort of thing, and I was always happy to see and hear him. Again, very good for a social setting, but can't see hitting the basement and cranking this to chill.

8 - Sounds like Buddy Tate to me, but the ideas seem a level below Buddy's. Maybe when Buddy was older or somebody trying to play like him. The recording sounds newer (electric bass, if I'm not mistaken -- listening on laptop). No guesses on the other players. Trumpet sounds like someone shooting for a Ruby Braff sort of sound, but with a Armstrongish feel.

9 - I appreciate this more than the last (or the first) because it's authentic. Not just the recording, the sound of the music itself. I'd never spin this, but I respect it.

10 - Heheheheh. I can't help it, this amuses me. "...a composition by my worthy constituent, Mr. Dizzy Gilespie..." It's not authentic to either period, but I like the fact that they're thinking outside the case on this one. I liked the trumpet players, but the sax players sound very stiff to me.

11 - Tom & Jerry... oh, wait. :D Tune is The Sheik of Araby. I don't know players of this era, but I always like to listen to this sort of thing. I'd throw out a guess that it might Fatha Hines, as he sounds kind of heavy handed. (Hey man, why couldn't all BFTs be like the first one I tried, where I knew most of the guys!?!?!?)

12 - Solitude. Sounds like Ron Carter to me, based on the 'thrumping' slides to some of the notes and the sketchy intonation. No idea of anyone else.

13 - Sounds like maybe Kenny Barron on piano. Not sure of the drummer... could be Victor Lewis if I'm right about KB, which I don't think I am. Perhaps one of the guys who came after KB like Geoff Keezer. I like the lines of the alto player, but he's under-executing them, almost like alto isn't his main horn.

14 - I know the tune, but can't name it. At times I was thinking Kenny Drew on piano, but it's not him.

15 - There's A Song In My Heart. Modern recording. Billy Pierce on ts. I'll guess Alan Dawson on drums, because it's flawless and I'm totally not diggin' him. Don't know the trumpet player. Sounds like James Williams on piano (but I could be biased by the association with BP).

16 - My Love is Here to Stay. No idea, but I have to wonder if it's two women a friend of mine sent me a video of. They were both about 30 and absolutely shredded. I'll say it's a modern recording with modern personnel.

17 - Evidence. (or as I heard Clifford Jordan describe it, "I've heard it called 'Just You, Just Me,' ... then somebody called it 'Justice'. I'm thinking somebody modern, like George Colligan or Ben Walzer. Drumming reminds me of Eric McPherson -- busy but inspired.

18 - No idea. Modern recording, lacks the authenticity.

19 - ???

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Prediction: Alex and I never hang out and listen to music.

^_^

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Prediction: Alex and I never hang out and listen to music.

^_^

HAHAHAHA! i just read your post and thought more or less the same thing. :)

as for track 11: embarassingly enough, i found i own it! it's from here. i was way, way off. should have recognised the man, but kept thinking of his duo stuff. ah well.

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Well, this is going to be educative - when the results are posted, that is. I've made a couple of guesses without any great confidence. But there's a lot of stuff in here that I found delightful (a few the other way, of course :))

1 What a funny little thing! Two comedians from the thirties making a novelty record with an imitation Dixieland backing. But the trumpeter is pretty good, so it probably isn’t imitation. The alto player also has a few chops in his back pocket.

Can’t help liking this!

2 “When you wish upon a star”! With a pianist putting in some clever modern stuff behind the alto player. I don’t know these players, but I’m going to guess Konitz & Tristano.

3 Oh, a guitarist, playing John Lewis’ “Django”. When it breaks out into a fast four, I’m reminded of the few cuts I’ve heard by Oscar Aleman. “Ooo,” (in a Brum accent) “it’s dead nice, this.”

4 “People” by a piano trio. Or is it? There’s another tune coming in here that I can almost remember the title of. And back to “People”. And into the groove part and I’ve no idea who this is. It sounds live. There’s something familiar about the way the pianist takes off into each of the groove sections – a bit Les McCann-ish, but it’s no way him. But the sound the guy is making is rather John Wright-ish. And I don’t think Wright made any live recordings.

I like this mystery man.

5 Another fast-fingered guitarist. The tone reminds me a bit of Toots Thielemans, though I’m not familiar enough with his work on guitar to really recognise him. Nice stuff!

6 Is this a ukulele? Whatever, it’s played very nimbly indeed and swings rather a lot more than one would expect. Yes, Bravo!

7 “You brought a new kind of love to me”. Don’t know who the violinist is but I’m going to say Svend Asmussen, just to prove I can’t spell it right :) Damn fine guitarist coming on now. Hell, surely this can’t be Django and Stephane? Well, sure sounds like it could be. Lovely, whoever.

8 Trumpet and tenor on a nice old song I can nearly remember. Gruff-voiced tenor player sounds like a European much influenced by Hawk’s sojourn over here. Who’s making with the knives and forks? Pleasant, without being soul-stirring.

9 “Anything goes” but not quite. Dutch Swing College Band type of stuff I guess. I think it’s actually an old New Orleans number they’re playing. Oh live! Yes, that’s how I think one should hear bands like this.

10 Red Indian drums, then a stirring bit of Euro-Dixie, but well arranged and executed. But I don’t think that trumpeter’s European. And that short tenor break sounds suspiciously like Hawk. This is all wrong for what I think it is. That long drum solo is right out of place for Euro-Dixie. So I don’t even know what it is, far less WHO it is.

11 Heavy boogie on “The Cheikh of Araby”. Fuck, that guy’s got some hands on him! He ain’t an old timer though. The intro and the middle section sound really quite modern to my ears. Gawd!

12 “Solitude” and I immediately suspect Ellington & Blanton. But I just noticed it’s four minutes long, so it can’t be. So I’ll have to listen to it more carefully. Back to the start. There seem to be two bass players here. Or is it a cello and bass? I think it’s a cello played by someone like Oscar Pettiford. Oh, now the other guy is having a go (or maybe not – I think not). Oh, enter a slightly scratchy clarinet player. Don’t like the clarinet’s sound here. Very interesting.

13 Sounds like a jazz record.

14 Sounds like this is based on “Blue & boogie”. Kind of interesting – well, a lot more interesting to me than #13, even though there’s some similarity of approach. But I’m very out of sympathy with this kind of music. It’s kinda Monkish but without the grooviness.

15 “With a song in my heart” by a fifties tenorman. I love the sound the trumpet player gets. If it’s Clifford Brown, you’ve just made me into a fan. Lovely!

16 “Our love is here to stay” by two trombones. Does that mean it has to be JJ & Kai? I think the one who started off is from an older generation. That dark sound is not something I associate with boppers. Ah, live. A pianist I should recognise with my thinking cap on. Then surely Paul Chambers on bass. Nice performance.

17 Rhythmically very, very on the edge – I get a very Monkish feeling about this. This one is Monkish WITH the grooviness. Pooh gosh! It’s effin’ magnificent! I can stand to listen to a LOT of this. Ho, sudden ending.

18 I suspect the vocalist of being the pianist, too; similar sense of humour. But if she is, she’s really playing behind her second chorus. So in the end, it came apart in me ‘and, Flight Sergeant.

19 Ta daaaaa!

Very enjoyable. Thanks for the ride, Durium.

MG

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as for track 11: embarassingly enough, i found i own it! it's from here. i was way, way off. should have recognised the man, but kept thinking of his duo stuff. ah well.

Well, blow me down!

MG

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Fun stuff. I liked much of it, some of it, less so.

1 - No clue. Not my bag, baby.

2 - Disney Theme (When You Wish Upon A Star). No idea who, maybe Frank Morgan.

3 - John Lewis' Django. No idea who this is. I want to like it, but it bugs me.

4 - Know the tune, but can't put a name to it. Shit... I know this recording -- I have this. Shades of Hank Jones, maybe, but I'm leaning towards Vince Guiraldi. If I don't have it, I want it! Why doesn't anybody play like this anymore?

5 - Don't know the tune or the players. I like it as a one off, but not sure I could listen to a whole album of this. This would be fun to see out in a social venue.

6 - No idea, not my t'ing.

7 - If it isn't Billy Bang or Michael White, I'm not likely to get a violin player! ;) I say this isn't my bag, but I used to run into a guy at a lot of jam sessions who played this sort of thing, and I was always happy to see and hear him. Again, very good for a social setting, but can't see hitting the basement and cranking this to chill.

8 - Sounds like Buddy Tate to me, but the ideas seem a level below Buddy's. Maybe when Buddy was older or somebody trying to play like him. The recording sounds newer (electric bass, if I'm not mistaken -- listening on laptop). No guesses on the other players. Trumpet sounds like someone shooting for a Ruby Braff sort of sound, but with a Armstrongish feel.

9 - I appreciate this more than the last (or the first) because it's authentic. Not just the recording, the sound of the music itself. I'd never spin this, but I respect it.

10 - Heheheheh. I can't help it, this amuses me. "...a composition by my worthy constituent, Mr. Dizzy Gilespie..." It's not authentic to either period, but I like the fact that they're thinking outside the case on this one. I liked the trumpet players, but the sax players sound very stiff to me.

11 - Tom & Jerry... oh, wait. :D Tune is The Sheik of Araby. I don't know players of this era, but I always like to listen to this sort of thing. I'd throw out a guess that it might Fatha Hines, as he sounds kind of heavy handed. (Hey man, why couldn't all BFTs be like the first one I tried, where I knew most of the guys!?!?!?)

12 - Solitude. Sounds like Ron Carter to me, based on the 'thrumping' slides to some of the notes and the sketchy intonation. No idea of anyone else.

13 - Sounds like maybe Kenny Barron on piano. Not sure of the drummer... could be Victor Lewis if I'm right about KB, which I don't think I am. Perhaps one of the guys who came after KB like Geoff Keezer. I like the lines of the alto player, but he's under-executing them, almost like alto isn't his main horn.

14 - I know the tune, but can't name it. At times I was thinking Kenny Drew on piano, but it's not him.

15 - There's A Song In My Heart. Modern recording. Billy Pierce on ts. I'll guess Alan Dawson on drums, because it's flawless and I'm totally not diggin' him. Don't know the trumpet player. Sounds like James Williams on piano (but I could be biased by the association with BP).

16 - My Love is Here to Stay. No idea, but I have to wonder if it's two women a friend of mine sent me a video of. They were both about 30 and absolutely shredded. I'll say it's a modern recording with modern personnel.

17 - Evidence. (or as I heard Clifford Jordan describe it, "I've heard it called 'Just You, Just Me,' ... then somebody called it 'Justice'. I'm thinking somebody modern, like George Colligan or Ben Walzer. Drumming reminds me of Eric McPherson -- busy but inspired.

18 - No idea. Modern recording, lacks the authenticity.

19 - ???

Thanks Thom for your suggestions. Let's have a look !!

2 - Disney Theme (When You Wish Upon A Star). No idea who, maybe Frank Morgan.

This track has been finished by Sidewinder.

3 - John Lewis' Django. No idea who this is. I want to like it, but it bugs me.

You find the correct title: Django ( John Lewis)

4 - Know the tune, but can't put a name to it. Shit... I know this recording -- I have this. Shades of Hank Jones, maybe, but I'm leaning towards Vince Guiraldi. If I don't have it, I want it! Why doesn't anybody play like this anymore?

Great - it's Vince. now the details please ....

8 - Sounds like Buddy Tate to me, but the ideas seem a level below Buddy's. Maybe when Buddy was older or somebody trying to play like him. The recording sounds newer (electric bass, if I'm not mistaken -- listening on laptop). No guesses on the other players. Trumpet sounds like someone shooting for a Ruby Braff sort of sound, but with a Armstrongish feel.

Not Buddy Tate

10 - Heheheheh. I can't help it, this amuses me. "...a composition by my worthy constituent, Mr. Dizzy Gilespie..." It's not authentic to either period, but I like the fact that they're thinking outside the case on this one. I liked the trumpet players, but the sax players sound very stiff to me.

You likes this and you're posting some wise words <_<

11 - Tom & Jerry... oh, wait. :D Tune is The Sheik of Araby. I don't know players of this era, but I always like to listen to this sort of thing. I'd throw out a guess that it might Fatha Hines, as he sounds kind of heavy handed. (Hey man, why couldn't all BFTs be like the first one I tried, where I knew most of the guys!?!?!?)

The tune is correct: The Sheik of Araby ( Snyder-Smith-Wheeler). But who's the piano player? Not Earl Fatha Hines

12 - Solitude. Sounds like Ron Carter to me, based on the 'thrumping' slides to some of the notes and the sketchy intonation. No idea of anyone else.

Two points for you. The tune is Solitude, played in a great way by Ron Carter. But who (is) are the other musician(s)

13 - Sounds like maybe Kenny Barron on piano. Not sure of the drummer... could be Victor Lewis if I'm right about KB, which I don't think I am. Perhaps one of the guys who came after KB like Geoff Keezer. I like the lines of the alto player, but he's under-executing them, almost like alto isn't his main horn.

No, sorry. The alto is the alto player's main instrument.

14 - I know the tune, but can't name it. At times I was thinking Kenny Drew on piano, but it's not him.

Another point - You're correct - it isn't Kenny Drew. The tune is, as I wrote in a previous, the pianist own composition and never saw it recorded by another one. Maybe it has the same chord-lines as a more known tune.

15 - There's A Song In My Heart. Modern recording. Billy Pierce on ts. I'll guess Alan Dawson on drums, because it's flawless and I'm totally not diggin' him. Don't know the trumpet player. Sounds like James Williams on piano (but I could be biased by the association with BP).

The tune is (almost) correct: With A Song In My Heart .

16 - My Love is Here to Stay. No idea, but I have to wonder if it's two women a friend of mine sent me a video of. They were both about 30 and absolutely shredded. I'll say it's a modern recording with modern personnel.

As far as I know all "women" on this record are "males".

17 - Evidence. (or as I heard Clifford Jordan describe it, "I've heard it called 'Just You, Just Me,' ... then somebody called it 'Justice'. I'm thinking somebody modern, like George Colligan or Ben Walzer. Drumming reminds me of Eric McPherson -- busy but inspired.

Correct, the tune is written by Monk and titled Evidence.

Thanks Thom. You wrote: Hey man, why couldn't all BFTs be like the first one I tried, where I knew most of the guys!?!?!?. Although you couldn't finish one of the tracks I think you found some valuable information. Thanksso-far and give it a another spin ....

Keep swinging

Durium

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Prediction: Alex and I never hang out and listen to music.

^_^

HAHAHAHA! i just read your post and thought more or less the same thing. :)

as for track 11: embarassingly enough, i found i own it! it's from here. i was way, way off. should have recognised the man, but kept thinking of his duo stuff. ah well.

Thanks Alex. for your suggestion to track 11. You're right. Shall I give the details?

peterson2.jpg

11. (3:02)

CAN'T STOP PLAYING THAT BOOGIE WOOGIE

OSCAR PETERSON TRIO:

Oscar Peterson p - Bert Brown b - Frank Garlépy dm

The Sheik of Araby (Snyder-Smith-Wheeler)

Recorded Montreal the 30th of April 1945

A year ago, one of the great piano players in jazz passed away - Oscar Peterson. His music and the way he has developed his playing is very recognizable, so I served you one of his early recordings, in which he played in the boogie woogie style.

31T6J5AVC8L._SL500_AA180_.jpg

I do have a copy of this track on the CD Can't Stop Playing That Boogie Woogie - Rare Classics From The Vaults ( JASMCD 2581), but I'm sure it's on other reissues too.

I once heard a record, on which Oscar Peterson sung - he really had a great voice. It must have been on the "Romance" album ( and I'm still searching for it.) Arnold Van Kampen, critic and author of the Oscar Peterson Discography told me that Oscar Peterson and Nat KIng Cole were close friends and had made an agreement: If you play the piano; I will sing as their voices sounded rather equal. If you find this interesting, you read about it.

Oscar Peterson (1925-2007) | Oscar Peterson - The Vocal Styling | Oscar Peterson's Van Gogh Story

Keep swinging

Durium

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Well, this is going to be educative - when the results are posted, that is. I've made a couple of guesses without any great confidence. But there's a lot of stuff in here that I found delightful (a few the other way, of course :))

1 What a funny little thing! Two comedians from the thirties making a novelty record with an imitation Dixieland backing. But the trumpeter is pretty good, so it probably isn’t imitation. The alto player also has a few chops in his back pocket.

Can’t help liking this!

2 “When you wish upon a star”! With a pianist putting in some clever modern stuff behind the alto player. I don’t know these players, but I’m going to guess Konitz & Tristano.

3 Oh, a guitarist, playing John Lewis’ “Django”. When it breaks out into a fast four, I’m reminded of the few cuts I’ve heard by Oscar Aleman. “Ooo,” (in a Brum accent) “it’s dead nice, this.”

4 “People” by a piano trio. Or is it? There’s another tune coming in here that I can almost remember the title of. And back to “People”. And into the groove part and I’ve no idea who this is. It sounds live. There’s something familiar about the way the pianist takes off into each of the groove sections – a bit Les McCann-ish, but it’s no way him. But the sound the guy is making is rather John Wright-ish. And I don’t think Wright made any live recordings.

I like this mystery man.

5 Another fast-fingered guitarist. The tone reminds me a bit of Toots Thielemans, though I’m not familiar enough with his work on guitar to really recognise him. Nice stuff!

6 Is this a ukulele? Whatever, it’s played very nimbly indeed and swings rather a lot more than one would expect. Yes, Bravo!

7 “You brought a new kind of love to me”. Don’t know who the violinist is but I’m going to say Svend Asmussen, just to prove I can’t spell it right :) Damn fine guitarist coming on now. Hell, surely this can’t be Django and Stephane? Well, sure sounds like it could be. Lovely, whoever.

8 Trumpet and tenor on a nice old song I can nearly remember. Gruff-voiced tenor player sounds like a European much influenced by Hawk’s sojourn over here. Who’s making with the knives and forks? Pleasant, without being soul-stirring.

9 “Anything goes” but not quite. Dutch Swing College Band type of stuff I guess. I think it’s actually an old New Orleans number they’re playing. Oh live! Yes, that’s how I think one should hear bands like this.

10 Red Indian drums, then a stirring bit of Euro-Dixie, but well arranged and executed. But I don’t think that trumpeter’s European. And that short tenor break sounds suspiciously like Hawk. This is all wrong for what I think it is. That long drum solo is right out of place for Euro-Dixie. So I don’t even know what it is, far less WHO it is.

11 Heavy boogie on “The Cheikh of Araby”. Fuck, that guy’s got some hands on him! He ain’t an old timer though. The intro and the middle section sound really quite modern to my ears. Gawd!

12 “Solitude” and I immediately suspect Ellington & Blanton. But I just noticed it’s four minutes long, so it can’t be. So I’ll have to listen to it more carefully. Back to the start. There seem to be two bass players here. Or is it a cello and bass? I think it’s a cello played by someone like Oscar Pettiford. Oh, now the other guy is having a go (or maybe not – I think not). Oh, enter a slightly scratchy clarinet player. Don’t like the clarinet’s sound here. Very interesting.

13 Sounds like a jazz record.

14 Sounds like this is based on “Blue & boogie”. Kind of interesting – well, a lot more interesting to me than #13, even though there’s some similarity of approach. But I’m very out of sympathy with this kind of music. It’s kinda Monkish but without the grooviness.

15 “With a song in my heart” by a fifties tenorman. I love the sound the trumpet player gets. If it’s Clifford Brown, you’ve just made me into a fan. Lovely!

16 “Our love is here to stay” by two trombones. Does that mean it has to be JJ & Kai? I think the one who started off is from an older generation. That dark sound is not something I associate with boppers. Ah, live. A pianist I should recognise with my thinking cap on. Then surely Paul Chambers on bass. Nice performance.

17 Rhythmically very, very on the edge – I get a very Monkish feeling about this. This one is Monkish WITH the grooviness. Pooh gosh! It’s effin’ magnificent! I can stand to listen to a LOT of this. Ho, sudden ending.

18 I suspect the vocalist of being the pianist, too; similar sense of humour. But if she is, she’s really playing behind her second chorus. So in the end, it came apart in me ‘and, Flight Sergeant.

19 Ta daaaaa!

Very enjoyable. Thanks for the ride, Durium.

MG

Thanks MG for your suggestions. Let's have a look !!

1 What a funny little thing! Two comedians from the thirties making a novelty record with an imitation Dixieland backing. But the trumpeter is pretty good, so it probably isn’t imitation. The alto player also has a few chops in his back pocket.

You don't have to apologize, MG - when I heard this band for the very first time playing in a concert on MEZZO television ( a French Jazz TV station) it made me mad ........ But the setitng is a sextet and the members are not from the 1930s.

2 “When you wish upon a star”! With a pianist putting in some clever modern stuff behind the alto player. I don’t know these players, but I’m going to guess Konitz & Tristano.

Sidewinder finished this track

3 Oh, a guitarist, playing John Lewis’ “Django”. When it breaks out into a fast four, I’m reminded of the few cuts I’ve heard by Oscar Aleman. “Ooo,” (in a Brum accent) “it’s dead nice, this.”

The title is correct. Of course Oscar Aleman's spirit is in this selection ( you should know that :excited: ), but not on this one. But there are some minor identical facts. The music of Oscar Aleman, he made, after he moved back to his native country Argentina between 1940 and 1980 is a closed book for most of you, because he (almost) never left South America ..... This great guitar player never left his country ....... and that's why but few of you may have heard his musical heritage.

4 “People” by a piano trio. Or is it? There’s another tune coming in here that I can almost remember the title of. And back to “People”. And into the groove part and I’ve no idea who this is. It sounds live. There’s something familiar about the way the pianist takes off into each of the groove sections – a bit Les McCann-ish, but it’s no way him. But the sound the guy is making is rather John Wright-ish. And I don’t think Wright made any live recordings.

I read three suggestions for this track so-far and each suggestion brings us closer to the definitive facts. It is the tune People, it is played live by Vince Guaraldi. Who'll finish this track?

5 Another fast-fingered guitarist. The tone reminds me a bit of Toots Thielemans, though I’m not familiar enough with his work on guitar to really recognise him. Nice stuff!

No, it's not our Toots ..... BTW: Is this man playing a guitar .......... ? <_<:excited:

6 Is this a ukulele? Whatever, it’s played very nimbly indeed and swings rather a lot more than one would expect. Yes, Bravo!

It is.

7 “You brought a new kind of love to me”. Don’t know who the violinist is but I’m going to say Svend Asmussen, just to prove I can’t spell it right :) Damn fine guitarist coming on now. Hell, surely this can’t be Django and Stephane? Well, sure sounds like it could be. Lovely, whoever.

No it isn't Svend Asmussen, but you spelled his name correct :rolleyes: and you're right: not Django and Stephane.

The title of the tune is wrong - sorry 'bout that.

8 Trumpet and tenor on a nice old song I can nearly remember. Gruff-voiced tenor player sounds like a European much influenced by Hawk’s sojourn over here. Who’s making with the knives and forks? Pleasant, without being soul-stirring.

These musicians are not Europeans ...... The tune is a James P.Johnson composition.

9 “Anything goes” but not quite. Dutch Swing College Band type of stuff I guess. I think it’s actually an old New Orleans number they’re playing. Oh live! Yes, that’s how I think one should hear bands like this.

No, not the DSCB, but when I heard this band for the very first time ............... whow !! You're right. That's how this stuff should be played :excited: BTW: The title is not Anything Goes.

10 Red Indian drums, then a stirring bit of Euro-Dixie, but well arranged and executed. But I don’t think that trumpeter’s European. And that short tenor break sounds suspiciously like Hawk. This is all wrong for what I think it is. That long drum solo is right out of place for Euro-Dixie. So I don’t even know what it is, far less WHO it is.

You're right - it's Euro-Dixie and it is really a band that loves to misled it's listeners. :excited:

11 Heavy boogie on “The Cheikh of Araby”. Fuck, that guy’s got some hands on him! He ain’t an old timer though. The intro and the middle section sound really quite modern to my ears. Gawd!

Alex. finished this track. In the middle section you can hear that it's (a young) Oscar Peterson I guess.

12 “Solitude” and I immediately suspect Ellington & Blanton. But I just noticed it’s four minutes long, so it can’t be. So I’ll have to listen to it more carefully. Back to the start. There seem to be two bass players here. Or is it a cello and bass? I think it’s a cello played by someone like Oscar Pettiford. Oh, now the other guy is having a go (or maybe not – I think not). Oh, enter a slightly scratchy clarinet player. Don’t like the clarinet’s sound here. Very interesting.

It are two bass players - one has already been identified by Thom I guess.

13 Sounds like a jazz record.

One point - you're right. :blink:

14 Sounds like this is based on “Blue & boogie”. Kind of interesting – well, a lot more interesting to me than #13, even though there’s some similarity of approach. But I’m very out of sympathy with this kind of music. It’s kinda Monkish but without the grooviness.

<_<

15 “With a song in my heart” by a fifties tenorman. I love the sound the trumpet player gets. If it’s Clifford Brown, you’ve just made me into a fan. Lovely!

And even if it isn't Clifford Brown, you should be a fan of him ...... <_< Well, the trumpet player isn't Clifford Brown.

The tenor man, indeed, made his first recordings mid 1960s. (so, almost correct).

16 “Our love is here to stay” by two trombones. Does that mean it has to be JJ & Kai? I think the one who started off is from an older generation. That dark sound is not something I associate with boppers. Ah, live. A pianist I should recognise with my thinking cap on. Then surely Paul Chambers on bass. Nice performance.

The tune is correct, but it's not JJ & KW, although both men adore Jay & Kai. I found out that one of the two bones was born in the early 1940s, so it depends what age you are to label him as "an older generation" :winky:

The piano player is one of my favorites. When this live recording was made Paul Chambers had passed away several decades earlier.

Oh boy - I almost handed the correct answer on a silver platter :blink:

17 Rhythmically very, very on the edge – I get a very Monkish feeling about this. This one is Monkish WITH the grooviness. Pooh gosh! It’s effin’ magnificent! I can stand to listen to a LOT of this. Ho, sudden ending.

The record is dedicated to Monk.

18 I suspect the vocalist of being the pianist, too; similar sense of humour. But if she is, she’s really playing behind her second chorus. So in the end, it came apart in me ‘and, Flight Sergeant.

No, the singer is singing and the piano player is doing his job !

19 Ta daaaaa!

The letter "a" is in the title - you're right, but in the originally title are seven "a's" and not 6 - that's the only thing I can find to be correct.

Thanks MG for all your suggestions. ave a drink and give it asecond chance.

Keep swinging

Durium

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Track 14 says to me 'Hank Jones'. The tune is an old bebop classic but the name eludes me. The precise and 'finnickity' chordal keyboard style (meant in a VERY good way I might add) says Hank Jones to me. If so, one of his more recent recordings.

No, it's not Hank Jones and the tune was written by the pianist himself and so, NOT an old bebop classic.

Keep swinging

Durium

Really? :blink: Maybe I'm thinking of another tune (and not 'Blue and Boogie') but this one will probably have me pulling my hair out in frustration. It does sound like Hank though !

Barry Harris? :blush:

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just listened to #7 a few more times. it sounds a lot like the hot club of san francisco--could it be them? i have most of their recordings, but not quite all, so i can't be sure. a wonderful group.

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Track 14 says to me 'Hank Jones'. The tune is an old bebop classic but the name eludes me. The precise and 'finnickity' chordal keyboard style (meant in a VERY good way I might add) says Hank Jones to me. If so, one of his more recent recordings.

No, it's not Hank Jones and the tune was written by the pianist himself and so, NOT an old bebop classic.

Keep swinging

Durium

Really? :blink: Maybe I'm thinking of another tune (and not 'Blue and Boogie') but this one will probably have me pulling my hair out in frustration. It does sound like Hank though !

Barry Harris? :blush:

No, Sidewinder, I'm sorry. It isn't Barry Harris nor Hank Jones.

Let me help you a bit, as I won't be kept responsable for your baldness :bwallace:

It's not an US musician. :excited:

Keep swinging

Durium

Edited by Durium

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just listened to #7 a few more times. it sounds a lot like the hot club of san francisco--could it be them? i have most of their recordings, but not quite all, so i can't be sure. a wonderful group.

No, sorry Alex. It isn't that group. Let me help you a bit. The violin player has played with DR ....... but he's not SG.

Keep swinging

Durium

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