The Magnificent Goldberg

BFT109 discussion thread

64 posts in this topic

Well, one person has already downloaded the BFT, so here's the discussion thread, ready and waiting.

MG

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Had a chance to listen to the entire set today. I don't have a whole lot to say (or guess) on some of these, but here are some first impressions...

1. Stardust. Delightfully eccentric. Hilariously (really, that's a compliment) well executed. I ought to know who this is, but it's just too early for me (actually it's mid-afternoon, so that's no excuse).

2. The tune is reminiscent of "The In Crowd". The trumpet sounds familiar, but I'm not prepared to offer a guess... unless I guessed Hugh Masekela... but I'm not sure I'm prepared to guess him, so...

3. I enjoyed this. Simple forumula, very nice results. I liked the variety of tricks in the organist's bag, and I remained interested throughout.

4. A minor blues with a hip little structural twist. I couldn't place the tune, although it sounded familiar, but I know this guitar player when I hear him. What a great solo. It's brief, but he made the most of it, as he always does. He may be my all-time favorite guitar player, and I consider him to be one of the most under-rated and under-appreciated players of all time. So, once I knew who the guitarist was, it didn't take me long to realize that I own this track, which is this: http://www.radioswissjazz.ch/cgi-bin/pip/html.cgi?lang=en&m=songinfo&v=fs&sid=2253fbbd7255e3c9177b2483c5435d884301

I love this blues structure, and now I want to work out the changes, as well as ponder how many other tunes have used it.

5. I'm a big fan of waltz tempos in jazz, but this one went downhill for me after the opening theme statement. The tune tune is okay, but I don't care for the way it's repeated so much in the arrangement. It becomes monotonous. None of the solos did much for me.

6. You know... I can't recall ever hearing Misty on a BFT. Such imagination, MG! ;) The tenor player sounds a lot hipper than the rest of the band (chords sound kind of mundane).

7. This has a sock hop sort of vibe to it, and I don't mean that in a good way. To me, this kind of take on the blues is kind of hard to listen to, like a Bill Haley record.

8. Nice funky watermelon mannish groove. Need to listen again later to see if it does more for me the next time around.

9. Simple swing tune… don't recognize the vocalist. Okay, but not much happening here for me.

10. St. Louis Blues... bored as I can be. ;) Oh well.

11. I'm A Fool To Want You. Thought I might have this in my collection, but it appears not. I think somebody will solve this one... need to listen again later.

12. You Go To My Head. Don't recognize this vocalist either, but I'm impressed with his phrasing and polish. Nice flute work also.

13. The sound quality on this suggests that it's not as old as the style being played.

14. Blue Velvet. A tune that's a little before my time, but this is one of the better versions I've heard.

15. You've Changed. I kind of prefer a more old-fashioned version of this (like Billie), but this singer has some skills.

For the time being, at least, I'm stumped on the bonus tracks.

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Had a chance to listen to the entire set today. I don't have a whole lot to say (or guess) on some of these, but here are some first impressions...

1. Stardust. Delightfully eccentric. Hilariously (really, that's a compliment) well executed. I ought to know who this is, but it's just too early for me (actually it's mid-afternoon, so that's no excuse).

2. The tune is reminiscent of "The In Crowd". The trumpet sounds familiar, but I'm not prepared to offer a guess... unless I guessed Hugh Masekela... but I'm not sure I'm prepared to guess him, so...

Just as well, because it's not Masekela :D

3. I enjoyed this. Simple forumula, very nice results. I liked the variety of tricks in the organist's bag, and I remained interested throughout.

4. A minor blues with a hip little structural twist. I couldn't place the tune, although it sounded familiar, but I know this guitar player when I hear him. What a great solo. It's brief, but he made the most of it, as he always does. He may be my all-time favorite guitar player, and I consider him to be one of the most under-rated and under-appreciated players of all time. So, once I knew who the guitarist was, it didn't take me long to realize that I own this track, which is this: http://www.radioswissjazz.ch/cgi-bin/pip/html.cgi?lang=en&m=songinfo&v=fs&sid=2253fbbd7255e3c9177b2483c5435d884301

Yep! You got it. I should have realised the guitarist wouldn't fool you. I do agree he's great.

I love this blues structure, and now I want to work out the changes, as well as ponder how many other tunes have used it.

5. I'm a big fan of waltz tempos in jazz, but this one went downhill for me after the opening theme statement. The tune tune is okay, but I don't care for the way it's repeated so much in the arrangement. It becomes monotonous. None of the solos did much for me.

6. You know... I can't recall ever hearing Misty on a BFT. Such imagination, MG! ;) The tenor player sounds a lot hipper than the rest of the band (chords sound kind of mundane).

You're possibly right about the tenr player being hipper than the rest, but possibly not :)

7. This has a sock hop sort of vibe to it, and I don't mean that in a good way. To me, this kind of take on the blues is kind of hard to listen to, like a Bill Haley record.

8. Nice funky watermelon mannish groove. Need to listen again later to see if it does more for me the next time around.

9. Simple swing tune… don't recognize the vocalist. Okay, but not much happening here for me.

10. St. Louis Blues... bored as I can be. ;) Oh well.

11. I'm A Fool To Want You. Thought I might have this in my collection, but it appears not. I think somebody will solve this one... need to listen again later.

12. You Go To My Head. Don't recognize this vocalist either, but I'm impressed with his phrasing and polish. Nice flute work also.

13. The sound quality on this suggests that it's not as old as the style being played.

14. Blue Velvet. A tune that's a little before my time, but this is one of the better versions I've heard.

The tune was introduced in 1951, so it came out quite a while after many of your favourite musicians were quite well established. Seems more old fashioned, perhaps.

15. You've Changed. I kind of prefer a more old-fashioned version of this (like Billie), but this singer has some skills.

For the time being, at least, I'm stumped on the bonus tracks.

Thanks for participating, Jim.

MG

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The tune was introduced in 1951, so it came out quite a while after many of your favourite musicians were quite well established. Seems more old fashioned, perhaps.

I think I sometimes unconsciously separate things like this in terms of popular music that I narrowly missed growing up with (and feels just slightly alien as a result), versus music from the same general era that I've had a desire to go back and explore, and feel a more positive connection with. In this particular case, although my objective side tells me that this is a lovely tune (and I really did enjoy hearing this version), I can't help but think of all the times I've heard the Bobby Vinton version, and all the times that I've associated this tune with schmaltz. But this is all a game that is played out in my head, and there's no legitimate explanation for some of the negative bias. One of the best things about this game is that I can change my mind whenever I feel like it. :)

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The tune was introduced in 1951, so it came out quite a while after many of your favourite musicians were quite well established. Seems more old fashioned, perhaps.

I think I sometimes unconsciously separate things like this in terms of popular music that I narrowly missed growing up with (and feels just slightly alien as a result), versus music from the same general era that I've had a desire to go back and explore, and feel a more positive connection with. In this particular case, although my objective side tells me that this is a lovely tune (and I really did enjoy hearing this version), I can't help but think of all the times I've heard the Bobby Vinton version, and all the times that I've associated this tune with schmaltz. But this is all a game that is played out in my head, and there's no legitimate explanation for some of the negative bias. One of the best things about this game is that I can change my mind whenever I feel like it. :)

Yes, pity about Bobby Vinton's version. It was initially a hit for Frankie Laine and I can't remember it from my youth; but Laine could often sing with passion and feeling, so maybe his version was pretty good.

MG

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The tune was introduced in 1951, so it came out quite a while after many of your favourite musicians were quite well established. Seems more old fashioned, perhaps.

I think I sometimes unconsciously separate things like this in terms of popular music that I narrowly missed growing up with (and feels just slightly alien as a result), versus music from the same general era that I've had a desire to go back and explore, and feel a more positive connection with. In this particular case, although my objective side tells me that this is a lovely tune (and I really did enjoy hearing this version), I can't help but think of all the times I've heard the Bobby Vinton version, and all the times that I've associated this tune with schmaltz. But this is all a game that is played out in my head, and there's no legitimate explanation for some of the negative bias. One of the best things about this game is that I can change my mind whenever I feel like it. :)

Yes, pity about Bobby Vinton's version. It was initially a hit for Frankie Laine and I can't remember it from my youth; but Laine could often sing with passion and feeling, so maybe his version was pretty good.

MG

Are you sure you aren't thinking of Tony Bennett? I can't find any evidence of a Laine recording.

So... back to the bft... The Clovers?

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The tune was introduced in 1951, so it came out quite a while after many of your favourite musicians were quite well established. Seems more old fashioned, perhaps.

I think I sometimes unconsciously separate things like this in terms of popular music that I narrowly missed growing up with (and feels just slightly alien as a result), versus music from the same general era that I've had a desire to go back and explore, and feel a more positive connection with. In this particular case, although my objective side tells me that this is a lovely tune (and I really did enjoy hearing this version), I can't help but think of all the times I've heard the Bobby Vinton version, and all the times that I've associated this tune with schmaltz. But this is all a game that is played out in my head, and there's no legitimate explanation for some of the negative bias. One of the best things about this game is that I can change my mind whenever I feel like it. :)

Yes, pity about Bobby Vinton's version. It was initially a hit for Frankie Laine and I can't remember it from my youth; but Laine could often sing with passion and feeling, so maybe his version was pretty good.

MG

Are you sure you aren't thinking of Tony Bennett? I can't find any evidence of a Laine recording.

So... back to the bft... The Clovers?

Not Frankie Laine; as you say,Tony Bennett. My mind's messed up.

Yes, the Clovers. Like to talk about the tenor player?

MG

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Taylor is a player whose name I know very well, but less so the details of his life and discography. I know he's famous for being present on several hits by other artists, most of which I've heard, and yet I don't feel I've ever really acquainted myself with the scope of his playing. He sounded great on this track, of course!

I see that he has five albums listed in my jazz guide, including an LP on Moodsville, which I've never seen nor heard. I may have to remedy that. Any idea how many of the five made it to CD?

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There was a compilation of Sam 'The Man' Taylor on Mercury - called 'Swingsation' - there were several with that title, but I only got the Red Prysock CD.

I have the Moodsville LP 'The bad & the beautiful' - nice but far from essential, I'd say. Not that I'd ever want to get rid of it. I think he's one of those guys, like King Curtis, whose defining work was in backing R&B artists to perfection.

What made you think it was Sam on that Clovers' record? I mean, do you have any evidence to that effect? The Jazz Discog project says that the personnel is all unknown. And there are different views of who it is.

MG

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What made you think it was Sam on that Clovers' record? I mean, do you have any evidence to that effect? The Jazz Discog project says that the personnel is all unknown. And there are different views of who it is.

Oops, I didn't realize that. I had done a search, and Taylor's name came up in more than one place, but it appears that this info may have been spread from one source (not sure yet where it started). Without a reason to doubt, I accepted what appeared to be correct, which is never a good idea. Perhaps we can get closer to the truth here as more people join in.

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What made you think it was Sam on that Clovers' record? I mean, do you have any evidence to that effect? The Jazz Discog project says that the personnel is all unknown. And there are different views of who it is.

Oops, I didn't realize that. I had done a search, and Taylor's name came up in more than one place, but it appears that this info may have been spread from one source (not sure yet where it started). Without a reason to doubt, I accepted what appeared to be correct, which is never a good idea. Perhaps we can get closer to the truth here as more people join in.

I hope so, too. I have great hopes that Jim Sangrey will be able to say instantly :D

MG

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I thought it was Gator Tail, but maybe I'm thinking of a different Clovers record...love the Clovers and their version of Blue Velvett, their best ballad?

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The two people I've heard who did this are Sam and Gator. Both opinions come from knowledgeable sources. Personally, my money's on Sam. But... could be Gator.

Thanks for chiming in.

MG

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Not too much from me as not many tracks triggered many ideas and some definitely fell flat for me but as always thanks MG for an interesting comp, I'm sure the reveal will surprise at least a couple of times.

Track 1 - Jim called it eccentric, I say "meh". My first thought was that the recording speed is wrong or the trumpet is out of tune.

Track 2 - going to say this is a 70s recording and as a wild, crazy off-the-wall guess, could it be one of Johnny Otis' live concerts?

Track 3 & 4 - Liked both but no guesses.

Track 5 - I'm sorry but I couldn't get past the flute solo.

Track 6 - Misty is a tune I honestly wish had never been written. Hate hate H - A - T - E it. So, you know, no guesses.

Track 7 - Rather non-descript R&B to me.

Track 8 - See track 3 and 4.

Track 9 - Ernie Andrews?

Track 10 - is this the first known cover of "St Louis Blues"? Feels about that old. Next.

Track 12 - I feel like I should know this vocalist; regardless I like this track the best of the group, and its not close.

Track 15 - Irene Reid? Mary Stallings? Ernestine Anderson, after her "bitch" days? I'm out of guesses.

Bonus Tracks:

No ideas but I'm anxious to know as I liked both of these.

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Not too much from me as not many tracks triggered many ideas and some definitely fell flat for me but as always thanks MG for an interesting comp, I'm sure the reveal will surprise at least a couple of times.

Track 1 - Jim called it eccentric, I say "meh". My first thought was that the recording speed is wrong or the trumpet is out of tune.

Track 2 - going to say this is a 70s recording and as a wild, crazy off-the-wall guess, could it be one of Johnny Otis' live concerts?

No, not Johnny Otis. Not 70s either.

Track 3 & 4 - Liked both but no guesses.

Track 5 - I'm sorry but I couldn't get past the flute solo.

Track 6 - Misty is a tune I honestly wish had never been written. Hate hate H - A - T - E it. So, you know, no guesses.

Track 7 - Rather non-descript R&B to me.

Track 8 - See track 3 and 4.

Track 9 - Ernie Andrews?

Not Ernie Andrews.

Track 10 - is this the first known cover of "St Louis Blues"? Feels about that old. Next.

I feel sure it's not the first cover of the song.

Track 12 - I feel like I should know this vocalist; regardless I like this track the best of the group, and its not close.

You do know this vocalist.

Track 15 - Irene Reid? Mary Stallings? Ernestine Anderson, after her "bitch" days? I'm out of guesses.

Not any of those. Another vocalist I'm sure you know.

Bonus Tracks:

No ideas but I'm anxious to know as I liked both of these.

You'll be surprised

MG

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#1 is Dave Bartholomew on trumpet, Deliuxe 1104, recorded 1947, with Joe Harris on alto sax, Clarence Hall on tenor sax, Fred Lands on piano, Meyer Kennedy on Guitar, Frank Fields on bass and Earl Palmer on drums.

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#1 is Dave Bartholomew on trumpet, Deliuxe 1104, recorded 1947, with Joe Harris on alto sax, Clarence Hall on tenor sax, Fred Lands on piano, Meyer Kennedy on Guitar, Frank Fields on bass and Earl Palmer on drums.

Jeez! I was expecting maybe Jeffcrom to get this one, not you! Bloomin' fantastic!

:party::party:

MG

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#1 is Dave Bartholomew on trumpet, Deliuxe 1104, recorded 1947, with Joe Harris on alto sax, Clarence Hall on tenor sax, Fred Lands on piano, Meyer Kennedy on Guitar, Frank Fields on bass and Earl Palmer on drums.

Jeez! I was expecting maybe Jeffcrom to get this one, not you! Bloomin' fantastic!

:party::party:

MG

Even a blind pig finds an acorn once in a while. I thought that #7 begins with a very characteristic Dave Bartholomew riff. To try to identify #7, I played my CD of Classics 5002, The Chronological Dave Bartholomew 1947-1950, in the car, hoping to find a song that began with that riff. To my surprise, the very first song on the CD begins just as your entire Blindfold Test begins.

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#1 is Dave Bartholomew on trumpet, Deliuxe 1104, recorded 1947, with Joe Harris on alto sax, Clarence Hall on tenor sax, Fred Lands on piano, Meyer Kennedy on Guitar, Frank Fields on bass and Earl Palmer on drums.

Jeez! I was expecting maybe Jeffcrom to get this one, not you! Bloomin' fantastic!

:party::party:

MG

Even a blind pig finds an acorn once in a while. I thought that #7 begins with a very characteristic Dave Bartholomew riff. To try to identify #7, I played my CD of Classics 5002, The Chronological Dave Bartholomew 1947-1950, in the car, hoping to find a song that began with that riff. To my surprise, the very first song on the CD begins just as your entire Blindfold Test begins.

Well, I never thought of that!

MG

PS and I recall now that it was you who was the only one to get the instrumental B side of Jessie Hill's 'Ooh poo pah doo' in an earlier BFT I did. I didn't think ANYONE would get that!

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Didn't have a whole lot of guesses here, this was a tough one for me. But a lot of great stuff here. Really enjoyed it. Thanks Allan! :party:
Track 1 - Stardust... this is superb. I can't guess who this is, but it strikes me that this must have been considered fairly avant-garde at the time of recording, considering the trumpet player's sound and style...holy cow. Lots of liberties taken with the tune here, nice phrasing and cool "effects" too, I love it.
Track 2 - Fun tune...very 70s, but that's cool with me. Sounds like the trumpet player has listened to a lot of Freddie Hubbard. I feel like I should at least be able to guess the bass player on this, but I'm coming up blank.
Track 3 - Oh yeah, this is killer...what a groove, totally infectious. This is rock solid, deep stuff. The organ player is just on fire (as is the rest of the band)...awesome. Very curious to know who this is.
Track 4 - Nice groove on this one too! Hmm, the alto solo makes me think of Oliver Nelson. Very nice solo too, I think it's the strongest here. The rest of the tune never quite gets off the ground for me personally, but that alto solo is terrific.
Track 5 - Sadly this one doesn't do a lot for me, so I'll just leave it at that.
Track 6 - Very nice rendition of Misty. Beautiful tenor sax tone...whoever this is has total command of the instrument. This honestly makes me want to hear the sax player more in a different context though. What a sound!
Track 7 - Okay, speaking of sound...holy moly. Some great bari playing there. Woo! The rhythm section is driving hard here too...fantastic.
Track 8 - I like the groove, but apart from that there's not a lot that stands out for me on this one.
Track 9 - Not sure about this one either to be honest, not crazy about the singer.
Track 10 - This is a blast. Love the singer...is he also the piano player? I like the trombone player in particular here also, fantastic sound. I need more stuff like this in my collection honestly, this is a whole area I'm not terribly familiar with, but I really enjoy it. Curious to find out if I've heard of these folks.
Track 11 - Love the mood here, this is a real late-night smoky kinda thang. The tenor player is right up my alley...he is smoooooth. Very compelling solos from both the organ and the tenor. The rhythm section is perfection throughout...totally supportive and sensitive.
Track 12 - Now THIS is singing...wow. This is fantastic...the singer has incredible control and a great, emotional delivery. In fact everything is just about perfect here. Excellent flute playing and superb support from the rhythm section. The bass player is taking a page from the Ron Carter playbook.
Track 13 - I like this a lot. Lots of soul here, these guys really know how to set a mood. Terrific sparseness in the piano solo...wonderful stuff, and that clarinet is killin. I love the little bit of interplay there between the clarinet and piano in the middle of the clarinet solo. And then those growls towards the end...yeah! I would love to know who this is.
Track 14 - Oh man...I LOVE the first four bars of this, but I did not expect it to go there. The tune itself and the vocals are okay, but the sax player is unreal. I am guessing that this must be one of the jazz greats guesting with a popular vocal group. Can't ID the sax player though.
Track 15 - Haha! Funny intro. I really like the singer, she is selling this big time. Very bluesy. The band is pretty hot too, great stuff. Once again, no guesses.
Track 16 - Another thoroughly enjoyable track, again in an area I'm not terribly familiar with so I have no guesses. But I like it a lot.
Track 17 - This one is nice & smooth. The trumpet player complements the singer perfectly. great vocals and tenor sax solo. I like the way the piano player comps too.

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#1 is Dave Bartholomew on trumpet, Deliuxe 1104, recorded 1947, with Joe Harris on alto sax, Clarence Hall on tenor sax, Fred Lands on piano, Meyer Kennedy on Guitar, Frank Fields on bass and Earl Palmer on drums.

Jeez! I was expecting maybe Jeffcrom to get this one, not you! Bloomin' fantastic!

:party::party:

MG

Even a blind pig finds an acorn once in a while. I thought that #7 begins with a very characteristic Dave Bartholomew riff. To try to identify #7, I played my CD of Classics 5002, The Chronological Dave Bartholomew 1947-1950, in the car, hoping to find a song that began with that riff. To my surprise, the very first song on the CD begins just as your entire Blindfold Test begins.

Well, I never thought of that!

MG

PS and I recall now that it was you who was the only one to get the instrumental B side of Jessie Hill's 'Ooh poo pah doo' in an earlier BFT I did. I didn't think ANYONE would get that!

I found that "Ooh Poo Pah Doo, Part 2", to be the easiest song to identify in any BFT. I don't have nearly the knowledge of New Orleans music that Jeffcrom does, but I know some.

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Oh hey, I'm on time for once! Kinda!

Track 1: This feels like a version of “Star Dust” I should like simply because it exists or because of who’s playing it, not necessarily because I particularly enjoy it. The trumpet sounds like he’s forcing everything. NMCOT™

Track 2: Unfortunately, this one isn’t doing much for me either. The groove is there, but this also sounds forced. Sadly, another NMCOT™

Track 3: Me likey. Interesting double-track of the organ. No clue who this might be. I think it wants to be mid-60’s Prestige vintage, but it sounds too recent. Either that or Contemporary was cuttin’ some greeeeeazy sides back in the day.

Track 4: Sonny Stitt on Varitone for Impulse? Was gonna say Eddie Harris, but the stereo spread suggests Impulse to me. However, a quick check of the Impulse discography tells me that, if it is Stitt, it’s not on Impulse. And now, on second listen, I’m no longer sure it’s Stitt OR Harris, because what I thought was a Varitone is just a standard alto & tenor. I’m still gonna guess it’s an Impulse record!

Track 5: Sounds like the theme to a 60’s sitcom. Which I love! They just don’t make TV themes like this anymore!

Track 6: Very nice. No clue, but very nice!

Track 7: First thought is Illinois Jacquet or Louis Jordan doing “Now’s the Time.” I really wanna say that’s Illinois’ brother on the bari sax!

Track 8: This reminds me of that Dizzy Gillespie/Gil Fuller Monterrey Jazz Orchestra record. Except for that so-cheesy-it’s-hip organ! Absolutely DIGGING this groove, though!

Track 9: Freddy Cole? No clue when it comes to vocals, but I can say that I didn’t dislike this!

Track 10: Cab Calloway doing the St. Louis Blues? I don’t know who else it could be!

Track 11: No clue. Sounds like the soundtrack to one of those old radio horror serials. Or Tex Avery’s WHO KILLED WHO? :lol Oh wait, there’s a tenor sax on this? I should check to see if this is from Grant Green’s GRANTSTAND. Naw, couldn’t be: Grant don’t comp like that. Oh! Oh! I know: Baby Face Willette!

Track 12: Same as track 9, but substitute Johnny Hartman for Freddy Cole.

Track 13: A very sleepy clarinet player.

Just like me (sans clarinet). Gonna finish this later and read others’ comments now (because it’s not like I’d remember anyway). I’m sorry, MG. Maybe it’s my own tired state that is preventing me from really enjoying all of this.

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Track 12 - Now THIS is singing...wow. This is fantastic...the singer has incredible control and a great, emotional delivery. In fact everything is just about perfect here. Excellent flute playing and superb support from the rhythm section. The bass player is taking a page from the Ron Carter playbook.

No he's not :D

It's Ron himself.

Glad you enjoyed so much of that.

MG

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Oh hey, I'm on time for once! Kinda!

Track 1: This feels like a version of “Star Dust” I should like simply because it exists or because of who’s playing it, not necessarily because I particularly enjoy it. The trumpet sounds like he’s forcing everything. NMCOT™

Track 2: Unfortunately, this one isn’t doing much for me either. The groove is there, but this also sounds forced. Sadly, another NMCOT™

Track 3: Me likey. Interesting double-track of the organ. No clue who this might be. I think it wants to be mid-60’s Prestige vintage, but it sounds too recent. Either that or Contemporary was cuttin’ some greeeeeazy sides back in the day.

Track 4: Sonny Stitt on Varitone for Impulse? Was gonna say Eddie Harris, but the stereo spread suggests Impulse to me. However, a quick check of the Impulse discography tells me that, if it is Stitt, it’s not on Impulse. And now, on second listen, I’m no longer sure it’s Stitt OR Harris, because what I thought was a Varitone is just a standard alto & tenor. I’m still gonna guess it’s an Impulse record!

Jim R got this one. ABC, not Impulse, but nearly. Recorded at Bell Sound - were a lot of Impulse records made there? I thought RVG did most of them, but never really checked.

Track 5: Sounds like the theme to a 60’s sitcom. Which I love! They just don’t make TV themes like this anymore!

Track 6: Very nice. No clue, but very nice!

Track 7: First thought is Illinois Jacquet or Louis Jordan doing “Now’s the Time.” I really wanna say that’s Illinois’ brother on the bari sax!

Not Russell Jacquet - a trumpet player, of course :D - on baritone. You're the first one to spot this as an adaptation of 'Now's the time'.

Track 8: This reminds me of that Dizzy Gillespie/Gil Fuller Monterrey Jazz Orchestra record. Except for that so-cheesy-it’s-hip organ! Absolutely DIGGING this groove, though!

Track 9: Freddy Cole? No clue when it comes to vocals, but I can say that I didn’t dislike this!

Not Freddy Cole.

Track 10: Cab Calloway doing the St. Louis Blues? I don’t know who else it could be!

Yes!!! It's a track from Cab's first session: 24 July 1930.

Track 11: No clue. Sounds like the soundtrack to one of those old radio horror serials. Or Tex Avery’s WHO KILLED WHO? :lol Oh wait, there’s a tenor sax on this? I should check to see if this is from Grant Green’s GRANTSTAND. Naw, couldn’t be: Grant don’t comp like that. Oh! Oh! I know: Baby Face Willette!

Not Baby Face, but one of the great most original organists (and one to whom I think Baby Face owed a bit of a debt.)

Track 12: Same as track 9, but substitute Johnny Hartman for Freddy Cole.

Not Hartman. (Or Cole :))

Track 13: A very sleepy clarinet player.

Just like me (sans clarinet). Gonna finish this later and read others’ comments now (because it’s not like I’d remember anyway). I’m sorry, MG. Maybe it’s my own tired state that is preventing me from really enjoying all of this.

Try #13 again, Al, when you're not so tired. This geezer ain't even slightly sleepy.

MG

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Track 1: This feels like a version of “Star Dust” I should like simply because it exists or because of who’s playing it, not necessarily because I particularly enjoy it. The trumpet sounds like he’s forcing everything. NMCOT™

Hot Ptah got this one. Yes, I can see finding it interesting because of who it is. I hope, when you read the thread and find out, you'll find it interesting because of who it is. To be perfectly frank, I've had to listen ot this track A LOT over a few weeks and I can hear where you're coming from. I still think it's fantastic, though, and a good wake-up call.

MG

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