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The Magnificent Goldberg

BFT 150 Discussion and apologies for the delay

65 posts in this topic

Sure, Walter Benton, absolutely. And if Gerald contracted the band for Marty, that could well be him, just as it could also be Jimmy Woode or Anthony Ortega on alto...Gerald did a liberty date with Julie London, right, a few years before this one?

That's the thing about album crews like this... Marty Patch might well have handled all the businrss, but just as easily might not have, It's the contractors who book the actual players for dates like these.

My speculations about Wilson are entirely speculatice, just that...there's a touch of flavor in that band that would not make me think  Marty Paich as first guess.

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Yeah, Marty Paich was a surprise to me when I saw his name on the cover.

Benton's a guy I've heard very little; just his album with Gerald Wislon and Grove Holmes and his Jazzland LP. So I'm far from near identifying him.

Don't think the alto player is Ortega, though.

The other connection Gerald was making at that time was with Ray Charles. He arranged 'You are my sunshine' and some other R&B tracks of the period. But I suspect most of the Charles band wuld be reasonably recognisable.

MG

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Whoever that alto player is, listen to the last two bars of the solo, it goes to a very non-beboppy place...If not Ortega, maybe Jimmy Woode? Or maybe even Shank or Pepper slipping one in past the sensors.

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19 hours ago, JSngry said:

Whoever that alto player is, listen to the last two bars of the solo, it goes to a very non-beboppy place...If not Ortega, maybe Jimmy Woode? Or maybe even Shank or Pepper slipping one in past the sensors.

Will focus on that later.

MG

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Track 16, "Leave My Man Alone", is very familiar to me in its male counterpart song, "Leave My Woman Alone", by Ray Charles. I thought I heard Margie Hendricks of the Raelettes on this Track 16. So I did some online investigating. I learned something from this Blindfold Test. I did not know that the Raelettes recorded their own albums, without Ray. From what I have read online, they recorded several singles and some albums. "Leave My Man Alone" seems to be a single which did not chart, from what I can find.

It's a great track! It may be my imagination but I think I hear Ray singing backup vocals, deep in the background.

One thing I love about the Blindfold Tests of The Magnificent Goldberg is that he chooses vocal songs with detailed lyrics, which are sometimes a little bit unusual. The lyrics are not commonplace. On this Track 16, I love the detailed lyrics at the end about what the woman might do to the man--shoot him, stab him, scratch his eyes out, pull off his hairpiece, drop a torpedo on him.  Likewise, I like the lyrics on Track 15, in which the woman sings about what the man has left her--his empty jugs of gin, mice in the kitchen, not just the usual things that might be stated.  In a Blindfold Test from some years ago now, The Magnificent Goldberg used a track in which a woman singer mentioned a fast food restaurant, and then went on and on with a very extensive list of fast food restaurants, many more than you would expect in any song.

I love unusual lyrics like that, and The Magnificent Goldberg is so good at finding them and presenting them to us.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Hot Ptah said:

Track 16, "Leave My Man Alone", is very familiar to me in its male counterpart song, "Leave My Woman Alone", by Ray Charles. I thought I heard Margie Hendricks of the Raelettes on this Track 16. So I did some online investigating. I learned something from this Blindfold Test. I did not know that the Raelettes recorded their own albums, without Ray. From what I have read online, they recorded several singles and some albums. "Leave My Man Alone" seems to be a single which did not chart, from what I can find.

It's a great track! It may be my imagination but I think I hear Ray singing backup vocals, deep in the background.

One thing I love about the Blindfold Tests of The Magnificent Goldberg is that he chooses vocal songs with detailed lyrics, which are sometimes a little bit unusual. The lyrics are not commonplace. On this Track 16, I love the detailed lyrics at the end about what the woman might do to the man--shoot him, stab him, scratch his eyes out, pull off his hairpiece, drop a torpedo on him.  Likewise, I like the lyrics on Track 15, in which the woman sings about what the man has left her--his empty jugs of gin, mice in the kitchen, not just the usual things that might be stated.  In a Blindfold Test from some years ago now, The Magnificent Goldberg used a track in which a woman singer mentioned a fast food restaurant, and then went on and on with a very extensive list of fast food restaurants, many more than you would expect in any song.

I love unusual lyrics like that, and The Magnificent Goldberg is so good at finding them and presenting them to us.

 

 

 

Thank you, Bill. You know, I do keep going on about real songs and it's because I like 'em.

And, by the way, it's not a HIM who's gonna have his hairpiece pulled off, it's the HER who's not leaving her man alone.

MG

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3 hours ago, The Magnificent Goldberg said:

Thank you, Bill. You know, I do keep going on about real songs and it's because I like 'em.

And, by the way, it's not a HIM who's gonna have his hairpiece pulled off, it's the HER who's not leaving her man alone.

MG

Oh, I see!

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Listening mostly at work, all on the laptop (making my excuses, already!)

1 - Not at all versed in the genre beyond Albert Ammons.  Always fun, to my ears.  No idea who or what this is, but it's very much done right.

2 - Wheeeew!  Burnin'!  Lyrical, to the point organ solo.  Percussive, rhythmic tenor with a set-and-a-half of BAWLS!  A real gun-slinger.  I'm guessing one of the blues guys I'm not familiar with.  Something really hinting at who it is for me.  Seems like a heavy Jaws influence, but seems like it's more likely a contemporary.  Man, those press rolls are pretty strong, almost Blakey-esque, but the rest of the feel seems all wrong.  Could certainly be him, though.  En fuego!

3 - First impressions are that it's George Benson's voice, but I can't place the setting.  Hints of Gene McDaniels, but I don't know of him doing anything like this.  No idea who the tenor is.  Maybe just a shade off of what he's trying to do.  Alto is more on target.  No guess on either.  Yeah, that's not Gene.  I'll stick with GB.  Reminds me a lot of the vocal Freddie The Freeloader with Jon Hendricks.

4 - Gah!  That electric bass.  Just don't like that sound.  I know it's NOT Wilson Picket.  Really like this take on the tune, though.  No idea who it is.  Oh man!  LOVE the transition.  Great renditions of both tunes.  Dig.

5 - Good ol' jammin' guitar.  No idea who, but s/he likes Santana.

6 - Sure sounds like Louis Jordan to me.  Not sure what it's from.  I have it on a compilation that was given to me.  Louis doesn't get nearly enough love for what he did.

7 - Sounds like someone trying to sound like Billie, but could be Billie.  Can't hear the tenor well enough on the laptop to make a guess.

8 - Bullish tenor of the period.  Doesn't particularly stand out, but neither does it disappoint.

9 - Standard for the genre, no idea who it is.

10 - No guesses.  Not sure where I am on this one.

11 - The Old Man From The Old Country.  Sure sounds like Gene McDaniels.  

12 - I want to like this more than I do.  It's not swinging as much as it wants to.  Reminds me of a Red Prysock recording my wife has.  The people who NAILED this stuff sort of ruined the stuff that is good but just a notch below for me.  No guesses.

13 - Egad... that BLI!  (bass-like instrument)  This one doesn't hit for me.  Has a bit of that Concord sound, but not nearly as clean.

14 - My Foolish Heart in an odd, du-wop style.  Not sure who.

15 - No guesses.  Fits with the them of the test.

16 - Man!  Based on this woman's voice, I do NOT want to cross her.  Wow!  This woman is MEAN!

17 - Unique arrangement.  Not sure who it is, but I REALLY like this cat's voice.

18 - Don't recognize this at all.  I find that organ a bit overpowering. 

19 - Very cool.  Well done across the board.  No guesses.

20 - Very 70s.  Dig it in a weird sort of a way.  First tenor sounds like George Adams to me.  Yeah, that's him, before he was really him.  I like it.  

21 - Hmmm.  I want to say Gator, but there is something a bit funny about the time.  It's a bad man, but the approach is almost like Jimmy Heath in that he's a little ahead of the beat.  I'll stick with Gator, because if it's not him, it's pretty close.  There Will Never Be Another You, Gator.

22 - This has the flavor of Abdullah Ibrahim, but I don't recognize it.  Could also be Randy Weston, but seems a little flashier than his style.

23 - Guessing this is from the early/mid-forties given the heavy military influence to some of the quotes by the piano during the intro.  And that is one bold, swingin' tenor!  Possibly Mr. Byas?  Followed by a pretty filthy alto, as well.  Probably way off, but pianist is pinging an Ellingtonian note for me, though the band seems more like the Basie band.  

Some fun ear candy in this one.  Thanks!

 

On 9/18/2016 at 2:04 AM, The Magnificent Goldberg said:

Yeah, I'd like to know who's on that album, too. Isn't Gene himself alive?

 

MG

Unfortunately, no.  Gene passed a few years back.  He'd lived locally for a number of years and I'd see him out about (particularly if there was good music in town).  Having asked him about other recordings, his memory for such things was not always good, so that may not have helped.  I never realized how much work he had done with so many people that we had no idea about.  Class guy and very much missed.

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5 hours ago, tkeith said:

Listening mostly at work, all on the laptop (making my excuses, already!)

1 - Not at all versed in the genre beyond Albert Ammons.  Always fun, to my ears.  No idea who or what this is, but it's very much done right.

Hot Ptah got this one. A pretty hard one, I'd say.

2 - Wheeeew!  Burnin'!  Lyrical, to the point organ solo.  Percussive, rhythmic tenor with a set-and-a-half of BAWLS!  A real gun-slinger.  I'm guessing one of the blues guys I'm not familiar with.  Something really hinting at who it is for me.  Seems like a heavy Jaws influence, but seems like it's more likely a contemporary.  Man, those press rolls are pretty strong, almost Blakey-esque, but the rest of the feel seems all wrong.  Could certainly be him, though.  En fuego!

THIS one is the Willis Jackson job, Thom :) Jim S got this one.

3 - First impressions are that it's George Benson's voice, but I can't place the setting.  Hints of Gene McDaniels, but I don't know of him doing anything like this.  No idea who the tenor is.  Maybe just a shade off of what he's trying to do.  Alto is more on target.  No guess on either.  Yeah, that's not Gene.  I'll stick with GB.  Reminds me a lot of the vocal Freddie The Freeloader with Jon Hendricks.

Actually, even though Jim S was the first one to phone a friend, YOU'RE the first one to guess it IS Gene McDaniels. So you get the prize.

I'm knocked out that you actually KNEW the man.

4 - Gah!  That electric bass.  Just don't like that sound.  I know it's NOT Wilson Picket.  Really like this take on the tune, though.  No idea who it is.  Oh man!  LOVE the transition.  Great renditions of both tunes.  Dig.

Glad you like this one, Thom. I do too. Jim S doesn't.

5 - Good ol' jammin' guitar.  No idea who, but s/he likes Santana.

Any resemblance to Santana is almost certainly Santana's cribbing, not the other way 'round. I think someone got this, but can't remember and didn't note it on my spreadsheet. I'll know better next time.

6 - Sure sounds like Louis Jordan to me.  Not sure what it's from.  I have it on a compilation that was given to me.  Louis doesn't get nearly enough love for what he did.

Yup, this is Louis Jordan. You'll know that Wild Bill Davis was in his band for quite some time prior to this recording.

7 - Sounds like someone trying to sound like Billie, but could be Billie.  Can't hear the tenor well enough on the laptop to make a guess.

Although Jim S has already identified the singer, he hasn't mentioned the tenor player. Try this one on your hifi  you could find a nice guy at the mouthpiece end.

8 - Bullish tenor of the period.  Doesn't particularly stand out, but neither does it disappoint.

9 - Standard for the genre, no idea who it is.

10 - No guesses.  Not sure where I am on this one.

11 - The Old Man From The Old Country.  Sure sounds like Gene McDaniels.  

Sure is!

12 - I want to like this more than I do.  It's not swinging as much as it wants to.  Reminds me of a Red Prysock recording my wife has.  The people who NAILED this stuff sort of ruined the stuff that is good but just a notch below for me.  No guesses.

Don't think anyone's got this yet. So now they all know, THIS ain't Red Prysock.

13 - Egad... that BLI!  (bass-like instrument)  This one doesn't hit for me.  Has a bit of that Concord sound, but not nearly as clean.

I was kind of expecting Jim S to get this, but no one has. Must be very hard.

14 - My Foolish Heart in an odd, du-wop style.  Not sure who.

15 - No guesses.  Fits with the them of the test.

HEY! This guy's detected a theme! Do tell, Thom :) 

16 - Man!  Based on this woman's voice, I do NOT want to cross her.  Wow!  This woman is MEAN!

YEAH! Jim S got this one and it's the only time, as far as I know, she ever sang lead.

17 - Unique arrangement.  Not sure who it is, but I REALLY like this cat's voice.

So do I. My wife hates him and thinks I'm a total fool for listening.

18 - Don't recognize this at all.  I find that organ a bit overpowering. 

19 - Very cool.  Well done across the board.  No guesses.

20 - Very 70s.  Dig it in a weird sort of a way.  First tenor sounds like George Adams to me.  Yeah, that's him, before he was really him.  I like it.  

Yep, this is George Adams, before he was really him. 'Course, I really liked him before, not after. Sorry.

21 - Hmmm.  I want to say Gator, but there is something a bit funny about the time.  It's a bad man, but the approach is almost like Jimmy Heath in that he's a little ahead of the beat.  I'll stick with Gator, because if it's not him, it's pretty close.  There Will Never Be Another You, Gator.

Nah! Gator NOT. As Jim S got it, you'll know it's Prysock YES.

22 - This has the flavor of Abdullah Ibrahim, but I don't recognize it.  Could also be Randy Weston, but seems a little flashier than his style.

As Hot Ptah said, it's a Weston tune, 'Congolese children', not played by Mr Weston.

23 - Guessing this is from the early/mid-forties given the heavy military influence to some of the quotes by the piano during the intro.  And that is one bold, swingin' tenor!  Possibly Mr. Byas?  Followed by a pretty filthy alto, as well.  Probably way off, but pianist is pinging an Ellingtonian note for me, though the band seems more like the Basie band.  

Sorry, Thom. Not Byas, not Basie, Pianist isn't Duke Ellington, either. Some of the guys in the band are well known, but not THAT well known. I thought this would be hard.

Some fun ear candy in this one.  Thanks!

 

Unfortunately, no.  Gene passed a few years back.  He'd lived locally for a number of years and I'd see him out about (particularly if there was good music in town).  Having asked him about other recordings, his memory for such things was not always good, so that may not have helped.  I never realized how much work he had done with so many people that we had no idea about.  Class guy and very much missed.

I'm glad you liked most of this, Thom. Jim jumped in early with damn good guesses and good research.

But having other stuff to do is a VERY good excuse.

MG

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2 hours ago, The Magnificent Goldberg said:

12 - I want to like this more than I do.  It's not swinging as much as it wants to.  Reminds me of a Red Prysock recording my wife has.  The people who NAILED this stuff sort of ruined the stuff that is good but just a notch below for me.  No guesses.

Don't think anyone's got this yet.

It got got.

2 hours ago, The Magnificent Goldberg said:

5 - Good ol' jammin' guitar.  No idea who, but s/he likes Santana.

Any resemblance to Santana is almost certainly Santana's cribbing, not the other way 'round. I think someone got this, but can't remember and didn't note it on my spreadsheet.

Jimmy Dawkins, who was 11 years older than Carlos, but didn't record his first LP until around the same time Carlos was doing so.  Anyway, I wouldn't make too much of any perceived similarities between those two.

Edited by Jim R

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Allmusic.com assists discovery of the gentleman with the good taste to cover Randy Weston - It's Ray Bryant from the album Cold Turkey.

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2 hours ago, randyhersom said:

Allmusic.com assists discovery of the gentleman with the good taste to cover Randy Weston - It's Ray Bryant from the album Cold Turkey.

I would not have thought so. That is really interesting. That track from "African Cookbook" could not have been very widely known. Of course Bryant could have heard Weston play the composition in person .

 

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5 hours ago, randyhersom said:

Allmusic.com assists discovery of the gentleman with the good taste to cover Randy Weston - It's Ray Bryant from the album Cold Turkey.

Correct Randy!

'Bout time SOMEONE got Ray Bryant. You ALL know his work, I'm sure.

MG

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I haven't looked at the answer cause I'm still absorbing the music. Sorry for being late.

1.       boogie woogie – no clue

2.       Funky organ – don’t know this one.

3.       Straight, No Chaser- but I don’t know who it is.

4.       Late in the midnight hour. Don’t know.

5.       I like the guitar playing. Don’t know how this is.

6.       I know this one, because I have it on the Complete Decca Recordings of Louis Jordan. Azure-te.

7.       Didn’t know, but found it on it on allmuisc. Etta Jones.

8.       No clue on this one

9.       I love this cover of Holiday’s Fine and Mellow.

10.   Don’t know.

11.   Don’t know.

12.   Is this Little Richard?

13.   Don’t know this either.

14.   Sounds like Ben E. King.

15.   Don’t know.

16.   Don’t know.

17.   Andy Bey? Na, it can’t be. Is it?

18.   Don’t know.

19.   I like this. I don’t know the artists. I can’t wait to see who it is

20.   Don’t know.

21.   There will never be another you. Don’t know who it is.

22.   Randy Weston’s Congolese children don’t by Ray Bryant. I have this one. 

  Complete Recordings [with Jimmy Rowser & Ben Riley]

23.   Don’t know.

 

Now time to read the answers.

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