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Hot Ptah

BFT156 Announcement and Discussion

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While we continue to enjoy Dan Gould's BFT 155, I want to announce that I am hosting BFT 156 in March.

Soon I will post a link to BFT 156, courtesy of Thom Keith. 

My approach to BFT 156 is to create a set of jazz tracks which are enjoyable to listen to, with hopefully some interesting surprises. To help with these goals, I ran the test by a small focus group. Here are their comments:

 

1. "As I listened to this Blindfold Test, I felt like my body was turning into a mechanical device. I could feel the steel plate hatch lift off of the top of my head. All of my sprockets flew out, far into the sky, out into outer space, where they sit there, glittering."

scott_aaronson1.jpg

2. "I am a dedicated nudist. I never wear any clothing at home. But as I listened to this Blindfold Test, I had a sudden, uncontrollable urge to put clothes ON. Lots and lots of clothes. Pretty soon I was wearing layers of clothes, including a down parka and a wool stocking cap, even though it was 80 degrees outside. Where do I have some blankets I can wrap around myself too?"

portrait-young-woman-funny-hairstyle-bar

 

3. "Wow! What a tasty Blindfold Test!

God! This is a tasty little sucker!"

131532-b.jpg

 

4. "My pet aardvark and I both really loved this Blindfold Test. It helped put my aardvark to sleep, and that is not easy to do, believe me!"

article-1384927-0BF583B600000578-435_634

 

5. "I loved Track 1 so much that I wrote a new arrangement of it, for solo contrabass ophicleide."

df77bf99d8e4aae464fe6c7105e4a55d.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Hot Ptah

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I am talking to Thom about getting the link activated.

 

 

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Ian and the shoe ftw, please.

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#2 certainly sounds like primo period McCoy Tyner with either Gary Bartz or Sonny Fortune, but I'm not placing it.  Will drive me crazy until I do!

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7 hours ago, felser said:

#2 certainly sounds like primo period McCoy Tyner with either Gary Bartz or Sonny Fortune, but I'm not placing it.  Will drive me crazy until I do!

   Thanks for getting the discussion started, John. I have to tell you that Track 2 does not feature McCoy Tyner, Gary Bartz or Sonny Fortune!

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Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

   Thanks for getting the discussion started, John. I have to tell you that Track 2 does not feature McCoy Tyner, Gary Bartz or Sonny Fortune!

Cool, can't wait for the ID,and  hope it already resides on my shelves somewhere!  And I'm sure Ian Underwood approves of it also!

Edited by felser

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It's early in the morning the usual thanks and discalaimers  heve not yet begum to rise, I'd like some eggs here in a little while, so le's pla.

TRACK ONE - That's a pretty song that sounds like it could have been used under the closing credits of a Ken Burns film. Easy to rise to!

TRACK TWO - That's Modal, Centric, and Thumpy, a popular trio of the middle 1970s based out of Nubianton, Nebraska. They made a lot of records that sounded like this, which is to say that they all sounded good. Here, they are joined by frequent collaborators Wlater Reedy andKenny Conguerrro. Their appearance always elevated the overal prentation of the group, and this no exception.

TRACK THREE - A very nice, mildly re-imaginged version of Manteca. The guitarist was familiar, and at first for some unexplained reason I kept thinking Larry Carlton. But once Ronnie Cuber hopped in, sleuthing was easy! http://www.cduniverse.com/productinfo.asp?pid=1278644

TRACK FOUR - Yeah, I remember when this record came out. The record was mastered really hot, and this seems to have been fixed here. Also, the cover seemed and still seems, uh...unfortunate. But other than that, yeah, this is a record worth playing many times, as is true of almost all of Blythe's Columbias.

TRACK FIVE - Clark Terry? No, not. Steeplechase is the tune, one of the nicer variants of Rhythm changes. The harmony of the head is always ignored for the blowing, though, so what's the point of having a head like that, really? I dunno about this one, tempo gets a little slippery in spots, and really, it's just cats playing rhythm changes really fast. I do like the guitarist more than the others, he/she freshens things up here and there. Otherwise, it could be any group of really good bop-based players anywhere, any time. Bu that drummer has Bobby Durham-itis in spots, not that it's not warranted here.

TRACK SIX - Oh lord, I've heard this one...might even have it. Tenor player sounds like he wasn't born there but moved in before puberty, close enough. I like it.

TRACK SEVEN - Well, you can't miss Jaws, so it didn't take too long to find Al Smith. Sorta hear some Sam Cooke influence here, Soul Stirrers Sam Cooke. That was a pretty pervasive thing in it's time/place. I think I missed this when it was out, might circle back and see if it's still out there. Jaws!

TRACK EIGHT - George Adams with Johnny Copeland. What else is there to say! That record made a bit of noise when it was released. Rounder did a good job at getting their product in the eyes and ears of the right people, and this one, with George, Arthur Blythe, & Byard Lancaster, got reviewed in the jazz press as well as the blues press.

TRACK NINE - Henry Threadgill is one of the great musical presences about of our time. When was that? Always! Good lord, you talk about a band making a debut with a ginormous WHOA!!!!! type record, this one was that. PLAYING!!!!!

TRACK TEN - Hubert Laws? No...James Newton? Ray Anderson? The composition s a little pastiche-y for me, but if played live, the sections could have been stretched out, Mingus-like and might have taken shape better on that scale. But everybody plays well here.

TRACK ELEVEN - Gotta think that's Ra. Yep, there's Gilmore.

TRACK TWELVE - YouTube-in Motherless Child Organ Solo returned some very interesting results, and eventually the correct one, Fats Waller V-Disc. I did not know, this is great!

TRACK THIRTEEN - That's hilarious! "Weird change there..", "Mixed up in your changes there kid", jokes about the bridge AND the lyrics, love it! Little Jimmy turner, yeah, there you go. EX-cellent!

Well, the sun is up, the day is done, I took the Test and it was fun, thank you!

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Posted (edited)

3 hours ago, JSngry said:

It's early in the morning the usual thanks and discalaimers  heve not yet begum to rise, I'd like some eggs here in a little while, so le's pla.

Thanks for these thoughtful comments, Jim. My responses are in red.

TRACK ONE - That's a pretty song that sounds like it could have been used under the closing credits of a Ken Burns film. Easy to rise to!

Somehow it was never used by Ken Burns.

TRACK TWO - That's Modal, Centric, and Thumpy, a popular trio of the middle 1970s based out of Nubianton, Nebraska. They made a lot of records that sounded like this, which is to say that they all sounded good. Here, they are joined by frequent collaborators Wlater Reedy andKenny Conguerrro. Their appearance always elevated the overal prentation of the group, and this no exception.

Oh, no, no, no!!! You are WAY off in your guesses. You did not guess a single name or location correctly.

TRACK THREE - A very nice, mildly re-imaginged version of Manteca. The guitarist was familiar, and at first for some unexplained reason I kept thinking Larry Carlton. But once Ronnie Cuber hopped in, sleuthing was easy! http://www.cduniverse.com/productinfo.asp?pid=1278644

I imagined that this was one track which no one would be able to identify. You get a special trophy for getting this one. DSC05772__57465.1479307739.400.400.jpg?c

TRACK FOUR - Yeah, I remember when this record came out. The record was mastered really hot, and this seems to have been fixed here. Also, the cover seemed and still seems, uh...unfortunate. But other than that, yeah, this is a record worth playing many times, as is true of almost all of Blythe's Columbias.

This is from Arthur Blythe's "In the Tradition", released on Columbia in 1979, and recently reissued on CD. This was released several years before Wynton Marsalis emerged as the young champion of "in the tradition." I guess that Arthur could not be packaged and sold the way that young Wynton was. I have always loved this album, and really all of the Blythe Columbias. Blythe is joined here by Stanley Cowell on piano and Air's rhythm team of Fred Hopkins and Steve McCall.

I saw this group live in the fall of 1980, only with John Hicks on piano. They opened for Sarah Vaughan. It was the best live performance I ever witnessed by Sarah. It was a great night of music.

TRACK FIVE - Clark Terry? No, not. Steeplechase is the tune, one of the nicer variants of Rhythm changes. The harmony of the head is always ignored for the blowing, though, so what's the point of having a head like that, really? I dunno about this one, tempo gets a little slippery in spots, and really, it's just cats playing rhythm changes really fast. I do like the guitarist more than the others, he/she freshens things up here and there. Otherwise, it could be any group of really good bop-based players anywhere, any time. Bu that drummer has Bobby Durham-itis in spots, not that it's not warranted here.

Not Clark Terry or Bobby Durham.

TRACK SIX - Oh lord, I've heard this one...might even have it. Tenor player sounds like he wasn't born there but moved in before puberty, close enough. I like it.

I would be surprised if you have heard this one before, or have it.

TRACK SEVEN - Well, you can't miss Jaws, so it didn't take too long to find Al Smith. Sorta hear some Sam Cooke influence here, Soul Stirrers Sam Cooke. That was a pretty pervasive thing in it's time/place. I think I missed this when it was out, might circle back and see if it's still out there. Jaws!

Yes. The liner notes contain the information that Jaws was given leave by the record label to showcase any artist of his choice, and he picked vocalist Al Smith. I find the contrasting organ styles on this track and on Track Six to be interesting.

TRACK EIGHT - George Adams with Johnny Copeland. What else is there to say! That record made a bit of noise when it was released. Rounder did a good job at getting their product in the eyes and ears of the right people, and this one, with George, Arthur Blythe, & Byard Lancaster, got reviewed in the jazz press as well as the blues press.

Yes. You are correct all around. It is from "Copeland Special." It is odd to me that even as of 2017, this album has never been reissued on CD.

TRACK NINE - Henry Threadgill is one of the great musical presences about of our time. When was that? Always! Good lord, you talk about a band making a debut with a ginormous WHOA!!!!! type record, this one was that. PLAYING!!!!!

Yes. You are correct. I love this album.

TRACK TEN - Hubert Laws? No...James Newton? Ray Anderson? The composition s a little pastiche-y for me, but if played live, the sections could have been stretched out, Mingus-like and might have taken shape better on that scale. But everybody plays well here.

One of your guesses is correct. Now which one? The Mingus reference is interesting.

TRACK ELEVEN - Gotta think that's Ra. Yep, there's Gilmore.

It is, but from when, and on which album? That is what makes this track interesting.

TRACK TWELVE - YouTube-in Motherless Child Organ Solo returned some very interesting results, and eventually the correct one, Fats Waller V-Disc. I did not know, this is great!

Yes. I thought that the beginning of this track sounds like something Sun Ra would have played many years later. I thought that the spoken word section might tip off who it was. I can only imagine GIs on some Pacific island, or in some European forest, during World War II, receiving this disc and playing it for their pleasure.

TRACK THIRTEEN - That's hilarious! "Weird change there..", "Mixed up in your changes there kid", jokes about the bridge AND the lyrics, love it! Little Jimmy turner, yeah, there you go. EX-cellent!

But who is it?

Well, the sun is up, the day is done, I took the Test and it was fun, thank you!

The day is done for you when the sun is up?

Quote

 

 

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Really enjoyable mix with everything I don't like about it concentrated in the last track.

   1.  Lyricism recalls Jarrett but no vocal sounds.  That description often applies to Frank Kimbrough or Brad Mehldau.  Since it's more soulful than showy, I'll go Kimbrough
   2.  The immediate impression is McCoy Tyner, so is it a staunch admirer or the real thing?  I say the real thing.
   3.  This uses the resources of major label smooth jazz in an organic and swinging way.  Nice guitar, congas and bari too.  Considering the big band embellshments, I don't know if Larry Coryell ever had this big an album budget.  Maybe this is a better (and more to my taste) track than I ever expected an Eric Gale or Larry Carlton to make.
   4.  So who's waltzing the Jitterbug here?  Maybe Arthur Blythe with John Hicks?
   5.  Fleet fingered guitarist in a bebop/JATP vein.  Hard to think of bebop era guitarists not named Kenny Burrell.
   6.  My guess is Don Patterson, the most bebop oriented of the organists.
   7.  The voice could pass for Bobby Blue Bland.  The backing band is primo, perhaps moreso that Bland usually recorded with.
   8.  More Blues.  I'm not familiar with the voice and presence of harmonica may indicate they are better known in blues or even R&B than jazz.  Voice is higher range than most jazz identified blues singers.  In my desperate attempt to field a guess, any guess I will say Jay McShann.
   9.  This feels European or perhaps South African.  Louis Moholo?
  10.  Nice flute.  A bit too modern for Jones-Lewis.  Akiyoshi-Tabackin, or Maria Schneider, perhaps?
  11.  Witty trombone and tart alto converse about the tradition in modern tongues  Henry Threadgill?
  12.  Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child.  Fats Waller.
  13.  The humor is not to my taste.  I acknowledge that the targets deserve it, but ugh.
 

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2 hours ago, randyhersom said:

Really enjoyable mix with everything I don't like about it concentrated in the last track.

   1.  Lyricism recalls Jarrett but no vocal sounds.  That description often applies to Frank Kimbrough or Brad Mehldau.  Since it's more soulful than showy, I'll go Kimbrough
   2.  The immediate impression is McCoy Tyner, so is it a staunch admirer or the real thing?  I say the real thing.
   3.  This uses the resources of major label smooth jazz in an organic and swinging way.  Nice guitar, congas and bari too.  Considering the big band embellshments, I don't know if Larry Coryell ever had this big an album budget.  Maybe this is a better (and more to my taste) track than I ever expected an Eric Gale or Larry Carlton to make.
   4.  So who's waltzing the Jitterbug here?  Maybe Arthur Blythe with John Hicks?
   5.  Fleet fingered guitarist in a bebop/JATP vein.  Hard to think of bebop era guitarists not named Kenny Burrell.
   6.  My guess is Don Patterson, the most bebop oriented of the organists.
   7.  The voice could pass for Bobby Blue Bland.  The backing band is primo, perhaps moreso that Bland usually recorded with.
   8.  More Blues.  I'm not familiar with the voice and presence of harmonica may indicate they are better known in blues or even R&B than jazz.  Voice is higher range than most jazz identified blues singers.  In my desperate attempt to field a guess, any guess I will say Jay McShann.
   9.  This feels European or perhaps South African.  Louis Moholo?
  10.  Nice flute.  A bit too modern for Jones-Lewis.  Akiyoshi-Tabackin, or Maria Schneider, perhaps?
  11.  Witty trombone and tart alto converse about the tradition in modern tongues  Henry Threadgill?
  12.  Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child.  Fats Waller.
  13.  The humor is not to my taste.  I acknowledge that the targets deserve it, but ugh.
 

Very interesting comments. You are correct with Arthur Blythe on #4 (Stanley Cowell is the pianist) and Fats Waller on #12. You are correct that the flute player on #10 is modern. Some of the players here would feel highly complimented by the guesses you made.

As for #13, humor is personal and subjective. To each their own.

 

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First impressions for BFT 156:

#1- Meditative reflection, almost an etude - piano "piece" from any era, no idea who?

#2- 70's rehash of Trane & McCoy, lively soprano (Carter Jefferson?), driving piano, good congas & rhythm section

#3- Rather soft rending of "Manteca", decent guitar, strong bari solo, band sounds slightly uninvolved

#4- Slightly parodied reading of "Jitterbug Waltz", maybe Arthur Blythe?

#5- Bird tune done "live", okay trumpet, rather muddy guitar, drummer a bit over the top and too tight; fast, yet unswinging

#6- Organ/tenor grind, doesn't quite catch the groove, no guesses?

#7- Jaws on tenor, Shirley Scott, organ(?) thought of Bobby Blue Bland (?) up front, churchy feel, unmistakable tenor sound

#8- Bluesy take on "St. Louis Woman", nice soulful feel, no clue?

#9- Henry Threadgill with one of his fast, furious, whacko marches, great playing all around, superb attentive drumming for 10+ minutes. Great stuff!

#10- Bass and flute(s) intro, good piano (John Hicks?), solid bass

#11- Horrid sounding piano of Sun Ra, "live", raw & real, with great John Gilmore tenor

#12- Bach-ian organ-cum-blues of "Motherless Child", slow, Phantom of the Opera-styled version. Very interesting! Thumbs up! I like it.

#13- Wow! SNL skit? HA! About the 3 minute mark, I was feeling "enough! enough already", a  L O N G  5 minutes, but point made!

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On ‎3‎/‎4‎/‎2017 at 8:03 AM, jojazz said:

First impressions for BFT 156:

#1- Meditative reflection, almost an etude - piano "piece" from any era, no idea who?

#2- 70's rehash of Trane & McCoy, lively soprano (Carter Jefferson?), driving piano, good congas & rhythm section

    It is not Carter Jefferson.

#3- Rather soft rending of "Manteca", decent guitar, strong bari solo, band sounds slightly uninvolved

   Interesting comments.

#4- Slightly parodied reading of "Jitterbug Waltz", maybe Arthur Blythe?

   Yes, it's Arthur Blythe. See my comments on JSngry's comments for more information.

#5- Bird tune done "live", okay trumpet, rather muddy guitar, drummer a bit over the top and too tight; fast, yet unswinging

   I like this more than you do, I can tell.

#6- Organ/tenor grind, doesn't quite catch the groove, no guesses?

    I noticed that the drummer seems to lose the groove a few times.

#7- Jaws on tenor, Shirley Scott, organ(?) thought of Bobby Blue Bland (?) up front, churchy feel, unmistakable tenor sound

    It is Jaws and Shirley Scott. Not Bobby Blue Bland. JSngry identified the vocalist.

#8- Bluesy take on "St. Louis Woman", nice soulful feel, no clue?

#9- Henry Threadgill with one of his fast, furious, whacko marches, great playing all around, superb attentive drumming for 10+ minutes. Great stuff!

      Yes.

#10- Bass and flute(s) intro, good piano (John Hicks?), solid bass

     It is good piano. It is not John Hicks.

#11- Horrid sounding piano of Sun Ra, "live", raw & real, with great John Gilmore tenor

    All correct. But I am still waiting for anyone to identify the year and the album.

#12- Bach-ian organ-cum-blues of "Motherless Child", slow, Phantom of the Opera-styled version. Very interesting! Thumbs up! I like it.

    Interesting comments.

#13- Wow! SNL skit? HA! About the 3 minute mark, I was feeling "enough! enough already", a  L O N G  5 minutes, but point made!

   This pre-dates SNL.

 

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Here is where we are on IDs for this Blindfold Test:

1.  No ID

2.  No ID

3. Jim Sangrey identified this by artist and album.

4. Jim Sangrey identified this by artist and album, and my reply fills in some of the details. Other members have identified Arthur Blythe as the leader.

5.  No ID

6.  No ID

7. This has been identified as Eddie Lockjaw Davis, Shirley Scott and Al Smith by several members. The album title and song title have not been provided.

8. Jim Sangrey identified this by artist and album, and my reply fills in some of the details.

9. Jim Sangrey identified this by artist and album, and song title. Other members identified Henry Threadgill as the artist.

10. No ID

11. Several members have identified Sun Ra and John Gilmore, but no one has provided the song title or album.

12. Jim Sangrey identified this by artist and album. Other members have identified Fats Waller as the organist.

13. No ID

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I like James Newton more than Ray Anderson for 10, but haven't been able to match the instrumentation to a Newton led recording.

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The singer/player on 13 sounds like Jack Sheldon to me.  In fact I'd bet on it.  He did some pretty funny things back in the day, but this one... ouch.  Very weak, and it went on wayyyy too long, imo.  But I know this kind of thing is highly subjective, so if makes some folks laugh, then more power to you I guess.

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12 hours ago, randyhersom said:

I like James Newton more than Ray Anderson for 10, but haven't been able to match the instrumentation to a Newton led recording.

It is James Newton playing flute on Track 10, and not Ray Anderson on trombone.

6 hours ago, Jim R said:

The singer/player on 13 sounds like Jack Sheldon to me.  In fact I'd bet on it.  He did some pretty funny things back in the day, but this one... ouch.  Very weak, and it went on wayyyy too long, imo.  But I know this kind of thing is highly subjective, so if makes some folks laugh, then more power to you I guess.

It is Jack Sheldon as the singer/player. You are right, humor is highly subjective. To me, this is by far the most humorous thing on this particular album, among several humor selections.

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I only know of one Sheldon comedy album, a stand-up thing on Capitol. Is this cut (which I did find funny) off a Sheldon album, or does he appear as part of a comedic ensemble? Or is this a music record with comedic interludes?

 

Ah! Found it!

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/store/music/album/jack-sheldon/live-at-don-mupos-gold-nugget/8d6kgx552z0l/rovi-review

I had no idea this existed. Cool!

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1 hour ago, JSngry said:

I only know of one Sheldon comedy album, a stand-up thing on Capitol. Is this cut (which I did find funny) off a Sheldon album, or does he appear as part of a comedic ensemble? Or is this a music record with comedic interludes?

 

Ah! Found it!

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/store/music/album/jack-sheldon/live-at-don-mupos-gold-nugget/8d6kgx552z0l/rovi-review

I had no idea this existed. Cool!

Yes, you have found it!

I discovered it at Prospero's Books in Kansas City, Missouri, an independently owned used bookstore. In addition to a CD and LP section on the second floor, the store has a random selection of CDs stacked near the first floor cash register, and other random stacks of CDs in odd places throughout the store. I found this CD on a windowsill on the side of the steep staircase going to the second floor, and impulsively decided to buy it.

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I must say this was one nice BFT. I will be playing this in car when driving distances. I haven't looked at anyone's responses yet. The only ones I would guess are

#8. There is no doubt that this is George Adams. He had his own sound that can't be copied, liked original Coca Cola. 

#12. Fats Waller. I have all the recordings I could get with Waller. 

 

Time to read the other replies. 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Hardbopjazz said:

I must say this was one nice BFT. I will be playing this in car when driving distances. I haven't looked at anyone's responses yet. The only ones I would guess are

#8. There is no doubt that this is George Adams. He had his own sound that can't be copied, liked original Coca Cola. 

#12. Fats Waller. I have all the recordings I could get with Waller. 

 

Time to read the other replies. 

 

 

 

You are correct on identifying George Adams and Fats Waller. Thanks for your kind words about the BFT!

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Finally got around to this.  Some goodies in here.  And some bizarre stuff! :D  

Track 01 - Very nice.  No idea what it is.

Track 02 - Very mid-70s sound.  Muse?  Could be Harold Mabern on piano, but more likely an off-shoot.  A lot of facility in that horn player; not easy to play that many notes on the unemployment stick and still have it sound like music instead of a bunch of mush.

Track 03 - Manteca... (why would you take liberties with that groove?  Are you going to make it *more* syncopated?)  That sure sounds like Cuber to me.  

Track 04 - Arthur!  From this!

Track 05 - Variation on Rhythm-a-ning.  Bitchin' trumpet work.  Very clean sound, almost like Clark Terry, but most definitely NOT him.  I can't identify anybody here, but this is cookin'.  

Track 06 - Tenor is just a tick off, and that makes it better, because he's working.  I like this.  

Track 07 - The attack is Jaws, but no triplets.  That leads me to think it's Gator.  Whomever it is, he is one bad MF!!!  LOVE this!  No clue on the vocalist, but I like him.

Track 08 - George Adams on soprano -- unmistakable!  Clearly, he's a sideman here, but no idea who it is (song is obvious, recording is not).  Hmmm... a little sleuthing and it *could* be Johnny Copeland.  I won't claim ID on this one as the only familiarity I have with Johnny is the record with Albert Collins and Robert Cray.  But, oh yeah, when the guitar comes in, that's him.  Is George on all of this?

Track 09 - Huh!  I doubted myself on what my ears were telling me.  I've got this.  The Threadgill Sextett!  I had the good fortune to see this band with the line-up of Reggie Nicholson, Thurman Barker, Fred Hopkins, Diedre Murray, Ray Anderson, Rasul Siddik, and, of course, Henry.  I believe this is from Just The Facts and Pass The Bucket.  Definitely Craig Harris on 'bone, and sounds more like Olu Dara than Siddik.  STELLAR!  

Track 10 - Has the sound of one of those Tapscott sessions, but that piano is definitely not HT.  I have to replay this one -- having to argue the indefensible while I listen... I hope I don't have an aneurysm before I finish the test.  Hmmm... that piano just flat doesn't swing... I feel like that's a clue.  The bone... I've listened twice, and I ended up half tuning out both times... I like it, but the fact that my mind wondered tells me it's not Craig Harris.  I'm really feeling this as a European band, but the sound is definitely Soul Note.  Definitely get the impression that these are not "inside" guys. 

Track 11 - Sound was jarring at first, then I was thinking Rahsaan, but that tenor in the arrangement sure has me thinking Gilmore.  And that could certainly be Marshall Allen on alto.  Is this an earlier (or early-middle) Sonny Blount date?  Oh yeah, that's John Gilmore -- SO unique.  Sad fact of things is that I built my Sun Ra collection in the digital era, so I positively suck at identifying the individual albums.

Track 12 - That has GOT to be Sun Ra.  I know that quote was Fats Waller, but I'm sure that's sampled.

Track 13 - Voices are somewhat familiar, but I can't say I know what it is.  I'm not proud of this, but I'm laughing.  Oh!  I know!  The guy giving the instructions sounds like Bobby Valentine!  That makes it even funnier!

AFTER READING THE THREAD:

New Rule:  Jim Sangry can't comment until page 2. ;)

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3 hours ago, tkeith said:

Finally got around to this.  Some goodies in here.  And some bizarre stuff! :D  

Track 01 - Very nice.  No idea what it is.

Track 02 - Very mid-70s sound.  Muse?  Could be Harold Mabern on piano, but more likely an off-shoot.  A lot of facility in that horn player; not easy to play that many notes on the unemployment stick and still have it sound like music instead of a bunch of mush.

Track 03 - Manteca... (why would you take liberties with that groove?  Are you going to make it *more* syncopated?)  That sure sounds like Cuber to me. 

It is Cuber.

3 hours ago, tkeith said:

Track 04 - Arthur!  From this!

Yes!

Track 05 - Variation on Rhythm-a-ning.  Bitchin' trumpet work.  Very clean sound, almost like Clark Terry, but most definitely NOT him.  I can't identify anybody here, but this is cookin'. 

I agree!

Track 06 - Tenor is just a tick off, and that makes it better, because he's working.  I like this.  

Track 07 - The attack is Jaws, but no triplets.  That leads me to think it's Gator.  Whomever it is, he is one bad MF!!!  LOVE this!  No clue on the vocalist, but I like him.

He is bad!

Track 08 - George Adams on soprano -- unmistakable!  Clearly, he's a sideman here, but no idea who it is (song is obvious, recording is not).  Hmmm... a little sleuthing and it *could* be Johnny Copeland.  I won't claim ID on this one as the only familiarity I have with Johnny is the record with Albert Collins and Robert Cray.  But, oh yeah, when the guitar comes in, that's him.  Is George on all of this?

George is on all of it!

Track 09 - Huh!  I doubted myself on what my ears were telling me.  I've got this.  The Threadgill Sextett!  I had the good fortune to see this band with the line-up of Reggie Nicholson, Thurman Barker, Fred Hopkins, Diedre Murray, Ray Anderson, Rasul Siddik, and, of course, Henry.  I believe this is from Just The Facts and Pass The Bucket.  Definitely Craig Harris on 'bone, and sounds more like Olu Dara than Siddik.  STELLAR!

Yes, stellar! You don't have the album right, but I love Just the Facts... too. 

Track 10 - Has the sound of one of those Tapscott sessions, but that piano is definitely not HT.  I have to replay this one -- having to argue the indefensible while I listen... I hope I don't have an aneurysm before I finish the test.  Hmmm... that piano just flat doesn't swing... I feel like that's a clue.  The bone... I've listened twice, and I ended up half tuning out both times... I like it, but the fact that my mind wondered tells me it's not Craig Harris.  I'm really feeling this as a European band, but the sound is definitely Soul Note.  Definitely get the impression that these are not "inside" guys. 

You will be surprised at who this is.

3 hours ago, tkeith said:

Track 11 - Sound was jarring at first, then I was thinking Rahsaan, but that tenor in the arrangement sure has me thinking Gilmore.  And that could certainly be Marshall Allen on alto.  Is this an earlier (or early-middle) Sonny Blount date?  Oh yeah, that's John Gilmore -- SO unique.  Sad fact of things is that I built my Sun Ra collection in the digital era, so I positively suck at identifying the individual albums.

it will be a surprise when you read the full identification.

Track 12 - That has GOT to be Sun Ra.  I know that quote was Fats Waller, but I'm sure that's sampled.

i thought it sounded a lot like Sun Ra too, although it is Fats from decades before. That really surprised me!

Track 13 - Voices are somewhat familiar, but I can't say I know what it is.  I'm not proud of this, but I'm laughing.  Oh!  I know!  The guy giving the instructions sounds like Bobby Valentine!  That makes it even funnier!

i think it is very funny myself!

AFTER READING THE THREAD:

New Rule:  Jim Sangry can't comment until page 2. ;)

Jim is really, really good at this!

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Yes, he is the grand poopba at this. 

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No, I have a certain zone in which I have a fair number of reference points. Past that, I'm really clueless. And there is a lot of "past that", a lot.

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