Dmitry

Checked your hearing lately?

13 posts in this topic

Went to see an ENT for an audiology exam, had my ears cleaned [one had a huge wax ball,which looked disgusting, the other ear had very little...don't know why such a disparity]. Sadly, their unit only measures up to 8kHz, so I went ahead and bought a test cd with pink noise up to 20kHz. So now I know I can't hear beyond 11kHz. Would be interesting to know what's hiding in those upper frequencies, but that's not an option for me. All in all I'm satisfied with the results, considering that my work involves close proximity to high-pitched noise for 30+ hours per week. Highly recommend having your ears professionally-cleaned yearly!! I can definitely hear the difference now.

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Fortunately you're not missing much of anything as only a few instruments rolloff any higher than 10kHz. 

330913d1271424698-frequency-range-chart-

This is the number one reason why "high resolution" digital audio is a farcical money making scheme with absolutely no audible benefits. 

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On 3/18/2019 at 0:13 PM, Scott Dolan said:

Fortunately you're not missing much of anything as only a few instruments rolloff any higher than 10kHz. 

330913d1271424698-frequency-range-chart-

This is the number one reason why "high resolution" digital audio is a farcical money making scheme with absolutely no audible benefits. 

Unless you are a dog.  Woof!

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What do the black lines represent on this diagram? Like the very top end of voices, and the very low end of tuba.

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On 3/18/2019 at 0:13 PM, Scott Dolan said:

Fortunately you're not missing much of anything as only a few instruments rolloff any higher than 10kHz. 

What about harmonics? Do you not consider them to be a part of the listening experience?

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Most of the instruments I hate are the high-pitched ones, so I'm not worried.  I still find myself turning the treble down rather than going the other way.  

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51 minutes ago, Teasing the Korean said:

Most of the instruments I hate are the high-pitched ones, so I'm not worried.  I still find myself turning the treble down rather than going the other way.  

Same here.

Though I do wonder if it’s a function of age/hearing loss. I wonder if the 18y.o. me would have  the same opinion. 

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Although the fundamental tones of these instruments are not very high frequency, there are harmonics that go beyond 11,000 cycles per second, and ideally, one needs to hear them.

Nowadays, drummers wear ear protection. Apart from the toms, a loud ride will damage the top end of the player's hearing. I have a very loud ride: it's a 22" Istanbul Agop 30th Anniversary model. (Supposedly, a limited edition, but still available.). The original owner purchased it in Manhattan, after a day's search. It comes with a nice leather bag. He took it, in the bag, to a jazz performance, and the drummer, Bill Stewart, saw it and asked to play it, and was highly inpressed. This series of cymbals are made in Turkey, and are the closest you can get to the old Turkish Zildjian Ks that the top guys used to have back in the 50s and 60s. As you may know, Zildjian moved to the U.S. (in the 70s, I think) and their cymbals are not as good as the Turkish ones. Their "K Constantinople" rides are good, and I have three of them, but they are not in the same class as the old Turkish Ks that Bu and the rest had. I also have the 30th Anniversary 18" crash and 14" hats. I would love to have shown those hats to Jo Jones: he would have loved them.

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