Dan Gould

BFT 190 Link and Discussion

36 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Here's the familiar link:

http://thomkeith.net/index.php/blindfold-tests/

14 tracks, a little over 90 minutes of swing-bop-hardbop straightahead goodness. (If using the player be sure to select 190 as it is second on the list not at the top).

Seriously no track was selected for it's BFT factor, all for their listening pleasure. And I think the sequencing is topflight too. So if nothing else it should be a pleasant way to pass an hour and a half.

A word to lurkers: Please take a moment to post even if it is to only note the tunes you hate. Hell, bring back the classic DKDC(tm) (Don't Know Don't Care) acronym.  Compilers are appreciative just to know someone is out there checking their comps out, because if nothing was posted, then nothing was heard. And if you want credit just for Name That Tune, just about anyone can get 10 out of these 14.

Thanks in advance to all participants in the inaugural 2020 BFT!

Edited by Dan Gould

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Track 2: A Horace Silver composition that I can't put a name to. 

Track 3: Another Si;ver composition and this time it's "Sister Sadie".

Track 4: "Things Ain't What They Used to Be". A medium-sized mainstream group of the sort that Johnny Hodges liked to record with, but that altoist isn't Hodges. Probably recorded 1950s.

Track 5: Another mainstream jump band. We used to do that sort of thing very well over here under the leadership of Bruce Turner, but I'm guessing this is the genuine American article.

Track 6: That farty tuba is funky in the extreme!

Track 8: Neil Hefti composition?

Track 9: Familiar tune. Can't name it.

Track 10: Early Miles Davis composition: "Sippin' at Bells"

Track 11: Gillespie composition, "Tin Tin Deo". Is it one-time Gillespie sideman Leo Wright?

Track 12: Monk composition, "Well You Needn't".

Track 14: "Easy Living"

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39 minutes ago, BillF said:

Track 2: A Horace Silver composition that I can't put a name to. 

Track 3: Another Si;ver composition and this time it's "Sister Sadie".

Track 4: "Things Ain't What They Used to Be". A medium-sized mainstream group of the sort that Johnny Hodges liked to record with, but that altoist isn't Hodges. Probably recorded 1950s.

Track 5: Another mainstream jump band. We used to do that sort of thing very well over here under the leadership of Bruce Turner, but I'm guessing this is the genuine American article.

Track 6: That farty tuba is funky in the extreme!

Track 8: Neil Hefti composition?

Track 9: Familiar tune. Can't name it.

Track 10: Early Miles Davis composition: "Sippin' at Bells"

Track 11: Gillespie composition, "Tin Tin Deo". Is it one-time Gillespie sideman Leo Wright?

Track 12: Monk composition, "Well You Needn't".

Track 14: "Easy Living"

Nailed the tunes Bill though I figured track 1 and 2 were among the easiest(?).

Track 4 is not Hodges, but its also not 1950s era. Track 5 is mostly not American, actually. Track 11 not Leo Wright.

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Track 1 is so familiar.  It has that Horace Silver quality—something in that vein.  I know this tune, though not this version.  Nice trumpet solo.

Track 2 is “Song for My Father,” one of the great tunes by Silver—and for Blue Note in general.  The pianist has some Silver qualities, but other elements too—so I don’t think it’s him.  The tenor is no Joe Henderson, but does his stuff well enough.

Track 3 is big band style Silver. I thought maybe Chuck Israels, but his version of “Sister Sadie” is much longer. Despite the affinities to big band music, Silver sounds best to me in relatively small to mid-size bands.

Track 4: I don’t know who this is, but certainly the alto imitates Hodges.  Overall this is very Ellingtonian.  This could be from the last decade.

Track 5: Another song in the more basic Ellington  mode.  No idea who it is.

Track 6: Nice swinging track and made memorable by the tuba.  Is it Bob Stewart?  Just a guess, since I doubt I can name another tuba player.

Track 7:  Nice relaxed saxophone duel, if a duel can be “relaxed.” 

 

 

Track 10: I’m not so sure about “Sippin.” The first solo sounded like Lew Tabackin.

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Track 14 also has me thinking Lew Tabackin...I guess he's in my brain today. 

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Posted (edited)

19 minutes ago, Milestones said:

Track 1 is so familiar.  It has that Horace Silver quality—something in that vein.  I know this tune, though not this version.  Nice trumpet solo.

 

Track 2 is “Song for My Father,” one of the great tunes by Silver—and for Blue Note in general.  The pianist has some Silver qualities, but other elements too—so I don’t think it’s him.  The tenor is no Joe Henderson, but does his stuff well enough.

 

Track 3 is big band style Silver. I thought maybe Chuck Israels, but his version of “Sister Sadie” is much longer. Despite the affinities to big band music, Silver sounds best to me in relatively small to mid-size bands.

 

Track 4: I don’t know who this is, but certainly the alto imitates Hodges.  Overall this is very Ellingtonian.  This could be from the last decade.

 

Track 5: Another song in the more basic Ellington  mode.  No idea who it is.

 

Track 6: Nice swinging track and made memorable by the tuba.  Is it Bob Stewart?  Just a guess, since I doubt I can name another tuba player.

 

Track 7:  Nice relaxed saxophone duel, if a duel can be “relaxed.” 

 

 

 

 

 

Track 10: I’m not so sure about “Sippin.” The first solo sounded like Lew Tabackin.

 

Track 4 not from the last decade ... not Bob Stewart on tuba ... and not Tabackin on track 10 ... or 14 either. ;)

 

Edited by Dan Gould

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The Track 1 composition is Herbie Hancock's "Watermelon Man". (I gave up before reaching the theme!)

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Just now, BillF said:

The Track 1 composition is Herbie Hancock's "Watermelon Man". (I gave up before reaching the theme!)

Couldn't handle the electric bass? I figured a bit of a curve ball for those familiar with my tastes and predilections. :g

 

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Yep, a famous tune for sure.  I'm sure it's been covered extensively.  

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Posted (edited)

 

On 1/1/2020 at 6:39 AM, Dan Gould said:

A word to lurkers: Please take a moment to post even if it is to only note the tunes you hate. Hell, bring back the classic DKDC(tm) (Don't Know Don't Care) acronym.  Compilers are appreciative just to know someone is out there checking their comps out, because if nothing was posted, then nothing was heard. And if you want credit just for Name That Tune, just about anyone can get 10 out of these 14.

A strong second on those thoughts.  Nothing more discouraging than to put in the hours preparing these, and have crickets in response.  Really nice to have people at least checking it out.   Also agree with Dan's assessment that his BFT is a really nice way to pass 90 minutes or so.  All go down easy on the ears in foreground or background.  Here are some of my thoughts on some of the cuts:

1 - "Watermelon Man" - not something I would listen to.

2 - "Song for My Father" - no such thing as a bad version of this song, and the pianist certainly has the Horace thing down.

3 – Nice big band version of this Horace Silver classic.  I know the tune well, but am going blank!

6 – Tuba power?  Later Gil Evans?

8 – Lively, I like this one.

9 – “Little Sunflower” really nice solo piano version.  I LOVE any version of this beautiful Kenny Barron song.  Here’s where our tastes best intersect!

11 -  “Tin Tin Deo”.   Classic line.  Sonny Criss, maybe?  Really good alto player  whoever it is.  Our tastes also definitely intersect here.

12 – “Well You Needn’t”.   Nice version, though I mainly like to hear Monk done by Monk.

 

Edited by felser

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3 hours ago, felser said:

 

A strong second on those thoughts.  Nothing more discouraging than to put in the hours preparing these, and have crickets in response.  Really nice to have people at least checking it out.   Also agree with Dan's assessment that his BFT is a really nice way to pass 90 minutes or so.  All go down easy on the ears in foreground or background.  Here are some of my thoughts on some of the cuts:

1 - "Watermelon Man" - not something I would listen to.

2 - "Song for My Father" - no such thing as a bad version of this song, and the pianist certainly has the Horace thing down.

3 – Nice big band version of this Horace Silver classic.  I know the tune well, but am going blank!

6 – Tuba power?  Later Gil Evans?

8 – Lively, I like this one.

9 – “Little Sunflower” really nice solo piano version.  I LOVE any version of this beautiful Kenny Barron song.  Here’s where our tastes best intersect!

11 -  “Tin Tin Deo”.   Classic line.  Sonny Criss, maybe?  Really good alto player  whoever it is.  Our tastes also definitely intersect here.

12 – “Well You Needn’t”.   Nice version, though I mainly like to hear Monk done by Monk.

 

Thanks for your thoughts John - glad some tunes appealed, and congrats on tin tin deo it is indeed Sonny Criss!

However my magic 8 ball says that Sunflower is a Freddie Hubbard composition. :)

 

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1 hour ago, Dan Gould said:

Thanks for your thoughts John - glad some tunes appealed, and congrats on tin tin deo it is indeed Sonny Criss!

However my magic 8 ball says that Sunflower is a Freddie Hubbard composition. :)

 

You're right on "Sunflower" and I knew that and meant to type it, but was thinking about Barron ("Sunshower") at the time.  This getting old in the brain business is tough!

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Got a nice Saturday morning window to do this, so carpe diem!

TRACK ONE - Wasn't sure but that it wasn't going to be "Shaky Ground", judging by that bassline! Ensembles are a little shaky in a few spots, but nothing deal-breaking. Solos are fully aware that this is a "for the older people" number, and play with both that and themselves in mind. I like the drummer pretty well, actually. sounds like it might be his/her date. This is the kind of thing you play in a club where there may or may not be people dancing at any given moment, becuase you may or may not be being presentend as a "jazz" band. I like it because it sounds like a place I've been. Places, actually. And no smack about the electric bass, please - that is being done exactly correct and well.

TRACK TWO - Horace's father sure must have sired a lot of sons! This one brought along a pretty interesting tenor player...Bubba Brooks? One of those "old style" players who kept moving ahead within their own space.

TRACK THREE - Sadie getting as good as she gives. Not Paul Gonsalves, but coming from that place. Oh, there's two tenors! And one might well be PG?!?!? This is a good track, good band, good chart, just good on all sides.

TRACK FOUR - Now there's a pocket that says we're playing for dancers, and if they don't dance, fuck 'em, that's their loss. Norris Turney? Cat Anderson? Hmmm...Solid.

TRACK FIVE - Dan-Dan The Dancing Man, Damn Dan, you dancin' for sure! Almost Laurence Brown? Nobody's in a hurry, they're right where they want to be. Imminently human.

TRACK SIX - WHOA! Last time I heard tuba down that low that strong was on an Anthony Braxton record, and this is not that. I'll give the nod to the guitarist, but for whatever reason, this sounds a little more "after the fact" than have the previous tunes. But that tuba lick, that little upward squiggly thing, I remember hearing Howard Johnson doing that on Svengali, on "Thoroughbred". So..

TRACK SEVEN - Ok, that's real time like a mo! Two grownass tenor players with a rhythm section to match (especially that good Billy-esque sproingy drumming, hell, I think it is Billy, tbh). My time of having all these voices on total recall is long past, but I can still tell real from baloney, and this is ALL real. *****, WAY up!

TRACK EIGHT - Hey, more electric bass!!!! And nobody dies!!!! Splanky Shout Chorus, played for keeps. Tell me that's not Bobby Durham on drums...sounds like something Concord-ian, but not in a bad way, just kinda runny-onny after a while. If this is the worst music I hear today, then today will be a pretty good day. It's pretty much a closed room, but it's not like a trap room or escape house, or whatever the kids today go to play in when they have money to burn.

TRACK NINE - Sounds like the seeds are ready to eat, maybe a little past ready. Familiarity breeds...complacency.

TRACK TEN - Who knew? https://www.discogs.com/Spike-Robinson-Al-Cohn-Quintet-Henry-B-Meets-Alvin-G-Once-In-A-Wild/release/6513511

TRACK ELEVEN - Sounds like a TV show?!?!? Definitely Sonny Criss doing "Tin Tin Deo". That was one soulful cat, Sonny Criss was. Must be this: https://www.discogs.com/Sonny-Criss-with-Georges-Arvanitas-Trio-Live-In-Italy/release/3143197

TRACK TWELVE - The record skipped on the first bridge, that was a shock! Not sure about this one, it's got a good pocket but is maybe trying too hard, a little "after the fact" maybe? Ok, I would like to take that Chinese cymbal and crack it over that drummer's head. Classic example of you because you can do something...like the song title says... Sorry to say it, but more strut than butt on this one.

TRACK THIRTEEN - Somebody who was once a little kid, apparently.  Knowing Dan's recent exploratory proclivities, I'll say this is a Percy France performance. I like it!

TRACK FOURTEEN - Yeah, it should be so easy...you gotta work like hell to make it that easy.

Thanks Dan, again you have shed some light into the deeper nooks and crannies of what might seem to be a narrow parcel of the jazz landscape, proving again that, never mind the forest, never mind the trees, there's also the soil, underneath which the roots run far, wide, and deep. Kudos for never forgetting that!

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Posted (edited)

35 minutes ago, JSngry said:

TRACK TWO - Horace's father sure must have sired a lot of sons! This one brought along a pretty interesting tenor player...Bubba Brooks? One of those "old style" players who kept moving ahead within their own space.

Not Bubba but the era is right.

Quote

TRACK THREE - Sadie getting as good as she gives. Not Paul Gonsalves, but coming from that place. Oh, there's two tenors! And one might well be PG?!?!? This is a good track, good band, good chart, just good on all sides.

Good that you moved back to Gonsalves as he is on tenor. This is a real interesting record, many choices to program, I went with the Horace track to keep the "BN/hardbop standards groove going ... which also allowed me to segue to ...

Quote

TRACK FOUR - Now there's a pocket that says we're playing for dancers, and if they don't dance, fuck 'em, that's their loss. Norris Turney? Cat Anderson? Hmmm...Solid.

I thought you might get this but no, and I think the reveal may surprise a few people.

Quote

TRACK FIVE - Dan-Dan The Dancing Man, Damn Dan, you dancin' for sure! Almost Laurence Brown? Nobody's in a hurry, they're right where they want to be. Imminently human.

Well perhaps almost but no.

Quote

TRACK SIX - WHOA! Last time I heard tuba down that low that strong was on an Anthony Braxton record, and this is not that. I'll give the nod to the guitarist, but for whatever reason, this sounds a little more "after the fact" than have the previous tunes. But that tuba lick, that little upward squiggly thing, I remember hearing Howard Johnson doing that on Svengali, on "Thoroughbred". So..

This is more "after the fact" - I thought the tuba would catch people's ear. Not the leader though if anyone is wondering.

Quote

TRACK SEVEN - Ok, that's real time like a mo! Two grownass tenor players with a rhythm section to match (especially that good Billy-esque sproingy drumming, hell, I think it is Billy, tbh). My time of having all these voices on total recall is long past, but I can still tell real from baloney, and this is ALL real. *****, WAY up!

If the players read this post, one would surely appreciate being called "grownass". Oh and edit to add not Billy.

Quote

TRACK EIGHT - Hey, more electric bass!!!! And nobody dies!!!! Splanky Shout Chorus, played for keeps. Tell me that's not Bobby Durham on drums...sounds like something Concord-ian, but not in a bad way, just kinda runny-onny after a while. If this is the worst music I hear today, then today will be a pretty good day. It's pretty much a closed room, but it's not like a trap room or escape house, or whatever the kids today go to play in when they have money to burn.

Yeah, not Durham on drums and not Concordian though that may be the perception. This is a major tenor player.

Quote

Very well done.

Quote

TRACK ELEVEN - Sounds like a TV show?!?!? Definitely Sonny Criss doing "Tin Tin Deo". That was one soulful cat, Sonny Criss was. Must be this: https://www.discogs.com/Sonny-Criss-with-Georges-Arvanitas-Trio-Live-In-Italy/release/3143197

And again.

Quote

TRACK THIRTEEN - Somebody who was once a little kid, apparently.  Knowing Dan's recent exploratory proclivities, I'll say this is a Percy France performance. I like it!

TRACK FOURTEEN - Yeah, it should be so easy...you gotta work like hell to make it that easy.

 

Indeed. Had no idea that Allen had posted track 14 but to me it is a thing of wondrous beauty, comparable to any ballad performance in the history of the music, up to and including Hawk's "Body and Soul". And preceding it is Percy doing his other Percy thing, playing the snot out of the blues. I wonder if his career would have been any different if he was the tenor instead of Clifford Scott.

Thanks, as always, for your insightful thoughts Jim.

Edited by Dan Gould

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So is "Sister Sadie" from that Nat Pierce record, The Ballad Of Jazz Street?

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3 minutes ago, JSngry said:

So is "Sister Sadie" from that Nat Pierce record, The Ballad Of Jazz Street?

I figured you'd have gotten it first. :tup

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Totally unaware of it until now (thank god for Google, as well as for Paul Gonsalves being pretty much unmistakable (although Tony Coe can get there, which is why the initial hesitancy, but at some point...you know)) sounds like a most interesting lineup, and this cut is very nice. Gonna have to look into it. Thanks for bringing it out!

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14 minutes ago, JSngry said:

Totally unaware of it until now (thank god for Google, as well as for Paul Gonsalves being pretty much unmistakable (although Tony Coe can get there, which is why the initial hesitancy, but at some point...you know)) sounds like a most interesting lineup, and this cut is very nice. Gonna have to look into it. Thanks for bringing it out!

What makes it extra interesting is that side 2 brings out Ellingtonian stuff I didn't expect from Pierce.  The record deserves a lot more notice than it probably has gotten - and it was recorded in 1961 but not released until 1997 from what I can tell.

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Just ordered a copy. Again, thanks!

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Track 01 - Watermelon Man, but by whom?  Really hate that electric bass (sorry, Tim).  Not quite buying the trumpet player.   Well, they’re consitent — not buying the tenor player, either.  My ears want George Adams, but instead, they’re getting the practice room.

Track 02 - I love the song, and I’m pretty sure you can’t do a bad version of it.  This one is not, however, one of my favorites.  Across the board, just feels to busy.  Is that a C-Melody saxophone?  Something recognizeable about the way he’s kind of cutting off the notes.  Incredible facility on the saxophone, but again, I almost want a little less.  Could be Red Holloway, but I don’t think so.

Track 03 - There we go.  Paul Gonsalves.  THAT’s how you play that shit.  BAD MF!  But playing Sister Sadie?  Hmmm… second tenor?  I recognzize the hell out of him, but can’t quite cull the name.  Okay, this is some mixed superband, isn’t it.  That first trumpet sure sounds like Clark Terry to my ear, but the second guy is unfamiliar.  Could be Louis Belson on drums.  Weird.  

Track 04 - Things SURELY Ain’t What They Used To Be.  Got that Concord Jazz sound.  Thinking it could be Norris Turney on alto.  Drummer needs to get high.  Or maybe it’s the bass player… something between them isn’t clicking.  Could be George Mraz.  Don’t know for sure who any of them are.

Track 05 - No doubt I should know the tune, but I do not.  I must be in a mood, because this is another rhythm section I’m just not diggin’.  Feel reminds me (and I know this is chronologically backward) of the rhythm section on David Lee Roth’s cover of Just A Gigolo/I Ain’t Got Nobody.  I like the trumpet, but not sure who it is.  If that’s not Gator, somebody owes him royalties and an apology.  Yeah, just not digging this pianist a shred.  No clue on the ‘bone.  Ah, but I do detect a needle.

Track 06 - Don’t know what that fat MF is, but I love it.  Not sure of the tenor — somebody I’m less familiar with.  Okay, so that was a tuba, then.  Narrows it down, a bit, but it’s not one of the two guys I can name.  :D  

Track 07 - This is the best rhythm section, yet.  This just works on all levels.  Elements of Clifford Jordan (not him) in the first tenor.  Second guy is pinging hard, but I’m not able to put a face or name to the ping.   They predate the math guys, and it shows.  Nothing particularly new happening here, but it’s HAPPENING.  Aaaaah… space.  Thank you, piano man.  The bass on this track is absolutely the glue.  Realized I wasn’t all that conscious of the bass, but it was right there enveloping me.  This one is a keeper, for sure.  Piano player might be a shade younger than the tenors.  That first tenor could be Teddy Edwards.  Second guy has a touch of J-Griff in his approach (NOT him).  Clearly the younger of the two players (strangled altissimo).  No clue on the drummer.  This is the class fo the test, thus far.

Track 08 - 80s recording?  Pablo or Concord?  That bass, those drums… man… it’s ugly.  The music works, but the sound is attrocious.  I am not familiar with the trombonist.  I usually don’t double up, but sure sounds like Red Holloway to me.  Not sure on the pianist.  Oscar Peterson seems too obvious a guess, but that’s what I’m hearing.  Man… that bass sound is just awful.  Maybe Alan Dawson on drums.

Track 09 - Little Sunflower.  There goes my first guess.  I was thinking it was going to be Tete Motolieu with George Coleman.  It is not that.  Another song difficult to do badly.  Ooo… those chords… could this be Harold Mabern?  The right hand seems a bit flowery for Harold.  

Track 10 - Know the song, can’t give you the title.  Goddamnit.  That tenor has me leaning to a well I’ve been to twice, and I just don’t think you’d do that to us (first guy).  Second guy has a Zoot quality to the tone, but he’s to slick.  To big tenors duking it out, can’t be a bad thing.  I know that second guy, but I’m not going to be able to deliver on the name.  Like Getz and Zoot had a mildly angry child.   Aaah… more space — thank you, piano man.  Maybe Hank Jones?  Guy in the left channel isn’t Jasper Thilo?  Shit.  Just had the title, but now it’s gone.  

Track 11 - Sketchy live recording, but a great feel.  Tin Tin Deo.  Could be Sonny Criss on alto.  Yes, I’m doulbing down on the Criss guess.  I was thinking maybe an LA date with Horace Tapscott, but I’m leaning Hampton Hawes on piano.  Other guys could be anybody — getting no read.   Couldn’t take it and did a little sleuthing.  It’s this.  

Track 12 - Well You Needn’t.  This approach/tempo isn’t really scoring for me.  It’s NOT Art Pepper, but I sure want it to be.  Not sure who the alto player is, but I’m going to guess Mel Lewis on drums because of that cymbal choice at the end of the alto solo.  Weird bass guess — Jamil Nasir.  

Track 13 - I don’t believe this guy’s math.  No idea who this is.   It works, though.

Track 14 - Easy Living.  Breathy as hell.  Someone I’m less familiar with, but have heard.  Playing the hell out of this.  Whomever it is, he’s influenced the hell out of Ricky Ford.  Almost sounds like Lockjaw with the triplets removed.  Definitely a later recording of an older guy (why it works).  I’ll kick myself when this gets revealed for sure. 

Man, a good listen.  I think it got better as it went on.  That last track is absolutely killin'!

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10 minutes ago, tkeith said:

Track 02 - I love the song, and I’m pretty sure you can’t do a bad version of it.  This one is not, however, one of my favorites.  Across the board, just feels to busy.  Is that a C-Melody saxophone?  Something recognizeable about the way he’s kind of cutting off the notes.  Incredible facility on the saxophone, but again, I almost want a little less.  Could be Red Holloway, but I don’t think so.

Not Red, but like Jim, you're in the general vicinity, era-wise.

10 minutes ago, tkeith said:

Track 03 - There we go.  Paul Gonsalves.  THAT’s how you play that shit.  BAD MF!  But playing Sister Sadie?  Hmmm… second tenor?  I recognzize the hell out of him, but can’t quite cull the name.  Okay, this is some mixed superband, isn’t it.  That first trumpet sure sounds like Clark Terry to my ear, but the second guy is unfamiliar.  Could be Louis Belson on drums.  Weird.

You got Gosalves and Terry. Jim got this one thru some sleuthing. Not Belson.  

Track 04 - Things SURELY Ain’t What They Used To Be.  Got that Concord Jazz sound.  Thinking it could be Norris Turney on alto.  Drummer needs to get high.  Or maybe it’s the bass player… something between them isn’t clicking.  Could be George Mraz.  Don’t know for sure who any of them are.

Not Mraz and definitely not Concord jazz sound - its a live show and not at the Concord Pavillion either. ;)

 

Track 05 - No doubt I should know the tune, but I do not.  I must be in a mood, because this is another rhythm section I’m just not diggin’.  Feel reminds me (and I know this is chronologically backward) of the rhythm section on David Lee Roth’s cover of Just A Gigolo/I Ain’t Got Nobody.  I like the trumpet, but not sure who it is.  If that’s not Gator, somebody owes him royalties and an apology.  Yeah, just not digging this pianist a shred.  No clue on the ‘bone.  Ah, but I do detect a needle.

If you hear Gator, the royalties and the apology go in the other direction.

Track 07 - This is the best rhythm section, yet.  This just works on all levels.  Elements of Clifford Jordan (not him) in the first tenor.  Second guy is pinging hard, but I’m not able to put a face or name to the ping.   They predate the math guys, and it shows.  Nothing particularly new happening here, but it’s HAPPENING.  Aaaaah… space.  Thank you, piano man.  The bass on this track is absolutely the glue.  Realized I wasn’t all that conscious of the bass, but it was right there enveloping me.  This one is a keeper, for sure.  Piano player might be a shade younger than the tenors.  That first tenor could be Teddy Edwards.  Second guy has a touch of J-Griff in his approach (NOT him).  Clearly the younger of the two players (strangled altissimo).  No clue on the drummer.  This is the class fo the test, thus far.

Glad to hear someone else giving this big ups. And again, someone would be very pleased to know they "predate the math guys".

 

Track 09 - Little Sunflower.  There goes my first guess.  I was thinking it was going to be Tete Motolieu with George Coleman.  It is not that.  Another song difficult to do badly.  Ooo… those chords… could this be Harold Mabern?  The right hand seems a bit flowery for Harold.  

Not Harold.

Track 10 - Know the song, can’t give you the title.  Goddamnit.  That tenor has me leaning to a well I’ve been to twice, and I just don’t think you’d do that to us (first guy).  Second guy has a Zoot quality to the tone, but he’s to slick.  To big tenors duking it out, can’t be a bad thing.  I know that second guy, but I’m not going to be able to deliver on the name.  Like Getz and Zoot had a mildly angry child.   Aaah… more space — thank you, piano man.  Maybe Hank Jones?  Guy in the left channel isn’t Jasper Thilo?  Shit.  Just had the title, but now it’s gone.  

Yeah none of the guesses are right but Jim sleuthed this one too. (I'm guessing he recognized Cohn and google did the rest?)

Track 11 - Sketchy live recording, but a great feel.  Tin Tin Deo.  Could be Sonny Criss on alto.  Yes, I’m doulbing down on the Criss guess.  I was thinking maybe an LA date with Horace Tapscott, but I’m leaning Hampton Hawes on piano.  Other guys could be anybody — getting no read.   Couldn’t take it and did a little sleuthing.  It’s this.  

Very good. Everyone needs this CD. Criss was on fire that night and I dig Arvanitas' contributions too.

Track 12 - Well You Needn’t.  This approach/tempo isn’t really scoring for me.  It’s NOT Art Pepper, but I sure want it to be.  Not sure who the alto player is, but I’m going to guess Mel Lewis on drums because of that cymbal choice at the end of the alto solo.  Weird bass guess — Jamil Nasir.  

Nope. The alto is famous the rest of the group not so much. 

Track 13 - I don’t believe this guy’s math.  No idea who this is.   It works, though.

Can you expand on that first comment? 

Track 14 - Easy Living.  Breathy as hell.  Someone I’m less familiar with, but have heard.  Playing the hell out of this.  Whomever it is, he’s influenced the hell out of Ricky Ford.  Almost sounds like Lockjaw with the triplets removed.  Definitely a later recording of an older guy (why it works).  I’ll kick myself when this gets revealed for sure. 

Man, a good listen.  I think it got better as it went on.  That last track is absolutely killin'!

Glad you liked it overall Thom. 

Well a lot of the regulars have checked in already so this may be a slow slog thru the rest of January, but I'm glad I had a lot of hits with Jim and Thom ... and some still interesting reveals left.

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50 minutes ago, Dan Gould said:

Track 13 - I don’t believe this guy’s math.  No idea who this is.   It works, though.

Can you expand on that first comment? 

By the math in his original comments, the alto player would be 100 years old.

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13 hours ago, tkeith said:

By the math in his original comments, the alto player would be 100 years old.

Ah that kind of math. thought you were talking about the musical kind.

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Some good stuff on this BFT some revelatory stuff.  I've had no experience of Nat Pierce and very little of Percy France (just one Jimmy Smith record).  The latter can sure play a ballad!

 

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7 hours ago, Milestones said:

Some good stuff on this BFT some revelatory stuff.  I've had no experience of Nat Pierce and very little of Percy France (just one Jimmy Smith record).  The latter can sure play a ballad!

 

Well that's a good result from this BFT - the introduction of previously unknown or mostly unknown artists. :tup

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