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CardinalJazzFan

BFT 193 Link and Discussion

29 posts in this topic

Here is my track by track commentary.  Overall, the BFT had a great flow to it, really good as a listening experience, thanks!  Really looking forward to the ID's on 8,9, and 11.

1 - good, Basie-ish big band.  Seems to be a backward-looking arrangement, with the growling horns and such.  I'm not particularly knowledgeable in this sub-genre, but enjoy it well enough.

2 - Old!  does not speak to me.

3 - It's an interesting cut, yet feels disjointed to me in some ways.  Not something I would return to.

4 -Nice track, but largely background music for me.

5 - I like this more than I would expect to, though I think it would benefit from brevity.

6 - I like the arrangement, not really in on the sax player.

7 - Nice cut.  More "out" than I would have expected from the opening.  I wouldn't mind owning this.

8 – Nice cut, modern without being out.  I really really like this one a lot.  Strong soloing, arranging, ensemble playing.  First class performance all around.

9 – Very strong tenor playing, reminds me of Gato Barbieri.   Good cut.  Would really enjoy checking out whatever album this is on.   Guitar playing is as much rock as jazz, but more controlled than, say, early Larry Coryell, and works for me very well.    Drummer listened intently to what Tony Williams was doing in the late 60’s with Miles and with the Lifetime.  Cut growns on me as it goes on.  I’m going to stick with a guess of Gato Barbieri with, say, Paul Metzke on guitar.  Whatever it is, I’m in.

10 – Boogie woogie!   Certainly enjoyable, though those sorts of things all tend to sound the same to me.

11 – I like this.  What interesting instrumentation, and “Delilah” is a marvelous song.  Hope I own this somewhere already!

12 – Nice cut, though it fades into the background for me.

13 – Well played, though not something I would listen to repeatedly.  Michael Brecker, maybe?  I always respect him, though he generally leaves me cold. 

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1)    “Siesta for the Fiesta”—Lester Bowie Brass Fantasy

2)    That sure sounds like the Ellington orchestra—early stuff, I’d say mid-30s or earlier.  But the wrinkle is the presence of organ.  Duke meets Fats Waller?

3)    Not bad, pretty laid back.  The sound reminds me a bit of John Lewis writing for a larger ensemble.  That could even be Milt Jackson.  It picks up and get punchier during the trumpet solo.  It seems to be a full big band, plus some strings. 

4)    This must be Duke again.  This is familiar, and it sounds like something off Far East Suite—except it isn’t (unless it’s a bonus track).  Cool stuff...I like hearing flute in jazz.

5)     This reminds me of Tyner’s Fly With the Wind album, although it certainly is not that.  Maybe James Newton on flute, though it doesn’t sound much like him.  Not bad.  Bass is rather prominent.  Maybe the bassist’s record?

6)     Very mellow, but it sounds like low-end Third Stream or soundtrack music.

7)    More modern (I’m guessing ) big band.  Some interesting writing, and a nice sudden shift into a funky section just past the 5-miute mark.  But I have no idea who this might be.

8)    I see you favor the big band sound. Pretty good track.  I’m not much up on big band stuff from the last 2-3 decades, just Carla Bley, Gerald Wilson, occasional forays by Dave Holland and McCoy Tyner.  Nothing suggests it’s any of them. 

9)    This could be Barbieri, or perhaps it’s Brecker (whom I know better for his more mainstream work).  Whatever it may be, this is what decent “fusion” sounds like.

10)                        Fun stuff, but I would certainly have a hard time identifying a boogie woogie pianist.

11)                        Flute seems to be another thread running through this BFT.  I have heard many versions of “Delilah,” but not this one.  Stephane Grappelli on violin?  Ray Nance?  Then we have some…oud?  I like this!

12)            Imagine, more flute!  I’m thinking James Spaulding.  I’ve heard plenty of his fine playing on Blue Note, where unfortunately he was never a leader.  Perhaps later Spaulding.  Oh man, on piano that has to be the one and only McCoy Tyner.  I don’t recall Spaulding and Tyner meeting up post-1960s. I would have to think it is the flute player’s date.  In any case, this is sterling stuff.

13)            "Útviklingssang” by Carla Bley.  This might be the version from Social Studies, or possibly a different one.  I’m a big fan of her music, and this is one of my favorite pieces by her.

 

Overall, this is a great BFT—lots of wonderful music.

 

 

1

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2 hours ago, felser said:

Here is my track by track commentary.  Overall, the BFT had a great flow to it, really good as a listening experience, thanks!  Really looking forward to the ID's on 8,9, and 11.

1 - good, Basie-ish big band.  Seems to be a backward-looking arrangement, with the growling horns and such.  I'm not particularly knowledgeable in this sub-genre, but enjoy it well enough.

 

2 - Old!  does not speak to me.

 

3 - It's an interesting cut, yet feels disjointed to me in some ways.  Not something I would return to.

 

4 -Nice track, but largely background music for me.

 

5 - I like this more than I would expect to, though I think it would benefit from brevity.

 

6 - I like the arrangement, not really in on the sax player.

 

7 - Nice cut.  More "out" than I would have expected from the opening.  I wouldn't mind owning this.

 

8 – Nice cut, modern without being out.  I really really like this one a lot.  Strong soloing, arranging, ensemble playing.  First class performance all around.

 

9 – Very strong tenor playing, reminds me of Gato Barbieri.   Good cut.  Would really enjoy checking out whatever album this is on.   Guitar playing is as much rock as jazz, but more controlled than, say, early Larry Coryell, and works for me very well.    Drummer listened intently to what Tony Williams was doing in the late 60’s with Miles and with the Lifetime.  Cut growns on me as it goes on.  I’m going to stick with a guess of Gato Barbieri with, say, Paul Metzke on guitar.  Whatever it is, I’m in.

 

10 – Boogie woogie!   Certainly enjoyable, though those sorts of things all tend to sound the same to me.

 

11 – I like this.  What interesting instrumentation, and “Delilah” is a marvelous song.  Hope I own this somewhere already!

 

12 – Nice cut, though it fades into the background for me.

 

13 – Well played, though not something I would listen to repeatedly.  Michael Brecker, maybe?  I always respect him, though he generally leaves me cold. 

 

Thanks for these reactions. You actually guessed a musician correctly and I thought no one would get him. Guitarist Paul Metzke on #9. Your other guesses were not correct but I liked reading your impressions of the music. 

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It sure sounds like Ray Nance to me on number 11  (Delilah) though I don't think I've ever heard Nance with a group this modern and I have no idea who anyone else is.   

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, medjuck said:

It sure sounds like Ray Nance to me on number 11  (Delilah) though I don't think I've ever heard Nance with a group this modern and I have no idea who anyone else is.   

It is Ray Nance on #11. 

3 hours ago, Milestones said:

 

 

1)    “Siesta for the Fiesta”—Lester Bowie Brass Fantasy

 

2)    That sure sounds like the Ellington orchestra—early stuff, I’d say mid-30s or earlier.  But the wrinkle is the presence of organ.  Duke meets Fats Waller?

 

3)    Not bad, pretty laid back.  The sound reminds me a bit of John Lewis writing for a larger ensemble.  That could even be Milt Jackson.  It picks up and get punchier during the trumpet solo.  It seems to be a full big band, plus some strings. 

 

4)    This must be Duke again.  This is familiar, and it sounds like something off Far East Suite—except it isn’t (unless it’s a bonus track).  Cool stuff...I like hearing flute in jazz.

 

5)     This reminds me of Tyner’s Fly With the Wind album, although it certainly is not that.  Maybe James Newton on flute, though it doesn’t sound much like him.  Not bad.  Bass is rather prominent.  Maybe the bassist’s record?

 

6)     Very mellow, but it sounds like low-end Third Stream or soundtrack music.

 

7)    More modern (I’m guessing ) big band.  Some interesting writing, and a nice sudden shift into a funky section just past the 5-miute mark.  But I have no idea who this might be.

 

8)    I see you favor the big band sound. Pretty good track.  I’m not much up on big band stuff from the last 2-3 decades, just Carla Bley, Gerald Wilson, occasional forays by Dave Holland and McCoy Tyner.  Nothing suggests it’s any of them. 

 

9)    This could be Barbieri, or perhaps it’s Brecker (whom I know better for his more mainstream work).  Whatever it may be, this is what decent “fusion” sounds like.

 

10)                        Fun stuff, but I would certainly have a hard time identifying a boogie woogie pianist.

 

11)                        Flute seems to be another thread running through this BFT.  I have heard many versions of “Delilah,” but not this one.  Stephane Grappelli on violin?  Ray Nance?  Then we have some…oud?  I like this!

 

12)            Imagine, more flute!  I’m thinking James Spaulding.  I’ve heard plenty of his fine playing on Blue Note, where unfortunately he was never a leader.  Perhaps later Spaulding.  Oh man, on piano that has to be the one and only McCoy Tyner.  I don’t recall Spaulding and Tyner meeting up post-1960s. I would have to think it is the flute player’s date.  In any case, this is sterling stuff.

 

13)            "Útviklingssang” by Carla Bley.  This might be the version from Social Studies, or possibly a different one.  I’m a big fan of her music, and this is one of my favorite pieces by her.

 

 

 

Overall, this is a great BFT—lots of wonderful music.

________________________________________________________________________________________

Replies to your Comments:

Thank you for the positive comments. It is nice to hear that you enjoyed it. 

 1. You have identified the song title and artist. As Lester Bowie does not play his usual slurs and other effects, I thought that no one would identify it. 

2. Fats Waller is on this one, Duke Ellington is not. There is another jazz giant on it. 

3. It is a big band, but not with any of the musicians you have named. I think that the musicians would be pleased to be compared to John Lewis and Milt Jackson. 

4. It is Duke Ellington. Not the Far East Suite, but you are in the right era of Duke.  

5. Those are interesting comparisons, but you have not named the artists. It is not the bass player's record. This is one of those albums I thought that everyone owns. I guess I am getting old and not everyone has the common jazz albums of my youth!

6. It is not in the Third Stream or soundtrack genres. The artist would find that interesting I think. 

7. It is a more modern group. 

8. It is not any of the bands you named. I do like big bands.

9. You have identified Michael Brecker as the tenor saxophone player here. He is in a sideman role on this album. 

10. The pianist may surprise you on this one. 

11. It is "Delilah" with Ray Nance on violin.

12. I think this is sterling too. It is McCoy Tyner, but not James Spaulding. It is not the flute player's date. 

13. Yes, that is the song title, the artist and you named the album (Social Studies).

 

You are quite good at identifying these songs! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by CardinalJazzFan

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Window open, let's play!

TRACK ONE - Tuba! VERY assertive trombone. I've gone from thinking older band to newer, very Ra-ish in that way. Ultimately no idea, but show bizness, bay-bay! And now, ladies and gentlemen...

TRACK TWO - "Willow Tree", I recognize the song from both Gil & Thad/Mel...with the organ, I'm thinking it's Fats himself?

TRACK THREE - Spiky AND bouncy on that intro!!! I like the writing. Latter-day Gerald Wilson, maybe? But maybe not so much. doesn't sound like players he uses, voicings, yes, blend, no.

TRACK FOUR - Duke. "Bourbon Street Jingling Jollies", from New Orleans Suite.One for the ages, imo.So many colors, so much depth to the orchestration, just....beautiful.

TRACK FIVE - hmmmm...sounds like Chico Hamilton + harp and minus Chico...keep waiting for it to turn into something else, but it's not going to, is it...oh wow, an ALTO solo! Norris Turney again? Arthur Blythe? Bobby Watson? Some New London Jazz guy? The sound is identifiable, sorta, but maybe not at this age or in this context, at least not for me? I think I could like it, maybe?

TRACK SIX - Phil Woods? Definitely Phil Woods-ish, but with a touch of Hank Crawford sprinkled on for that Jenny Saykwah aftertaste. Geez, those woodwind voicings are close...no room for error, pitch-wise...oh geez, that IS Phil Woods, that tribute to Oliver Nelson he dod. that explains EVERYTHING, then. It's heartfelt for sure, I mean, how could it not be? Woods saw some of these guys SO up-close and behind the scenes...he knew what he was going on and who he would love, and Oliver Nelson had to have been one of them. That would have explained those voicings too, Woods arranged the album, too, right? So he knew how Nelson worked that,, literally knew from exposure and being in there with it. Ok, Phil Woods, then.

TRACK SEVEN - Randy Weston? Sounds like a band that would have liked to have played together more than they probably actually di...and I mean that as a compliment in the face of economic realities. But no, not Randy Weston? God, i wish that bigger bands had chances to play live regularly, it makes SUCH a difference when you have a band whose spirit is true. Ok, that head is familiar, not sure why they shifted the groove there, it doesn't add anything, really. Muhal, maybe, judging from how it ends up?

TRACK EIGHT - Sounds like Los Angeles. Not that it is, just sounds like that, that post-Kenton thing with a "lab band" type of proficiency/propensity, writing and playing...and recording. I like that when it works, and this works. Don't know that I'd leave the house to hear it, but since I'm not having to do that for this, hey! Saul Goode!

TRACK NINE - Every BFT has at least one "oh crap, I KNOW I've heard this one somewhere before" cut. Here it is. Sounds very much "of its time" and I mean that in the best possible way. Guitar is definitely going for a Dominique Gaumont/Reggie Lucas/Pete Cosey thing, so from that time, and that circle, I'd guess. The obvious guess is Brecker, but that does not sound like Brecker of that time to me, not on the finer points. Interesting...many possibilities, maybe up to and including Teo Macero? Or a record made for the Japanese market? I like it, definitely like it.

TRACK TEN - Almost sounds like three hands, which would make it Buck Hammer? I've never heard his record, and probably still haven't!

TRACK ELEVEN - YEAH! Balanced within itself. This is probably one of those "shoulda carpe-diem-ed when I had the chance" items": https://www.dustygroove.com/item/719497?sf=ray+nance&incl_oos=1&incl_cs=1&kwfilter=ray+nance&sort_order=artisan

TRACK TWELVE - No idea, but surely that's McCoy? Also sounds like one of his compositions, but drawing a blank on the name of it.

TRACK THIRTEEN - not in the mood for this right now..or am I? I think i can be...ok, I will be....and now I am. It's that tempo and that one chord. This is understanding how music works, not just how it sounds or feels, but what you need to do to get it to do all that. And the tenor player is taking their time. Hell, EVERYBODY is.Weighty without being burdensome, quite the opposite.

Pretty damn nice compilation here, and thanks for not includinf Denny McLain!

 

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Duke with New Orleans Suite....I have not heard that one in ages.  I do recall it having some prominent flute, which is the only record of his for which that is true (as far as I know).

On #11 Ahmed Abdul-Malik makes perfect sense. 

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White Elephant on #9? Not at all familiar with that record except on the most casual of levels, probably should be by now. but hey...

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Posted (edited)

52 minutes ago, JSngry said:

Window open, let's play!

TRACK ONE - Tuba! VERY assertive trombone. I've gone from thinking older band to newer, very Ra-ish in that way. Ultimately no idea, but show bizness, bay-bay! And now, ladies and gentlemen...

TRACK TWO - "Willow Tree", I recognize the song from both Gil & Thad/Mel...with the organ, I'm thinking it's Fats himself?

TRACK THREE - Spiky AND bouncy on that intro!!! I like the writing. Latter-day Gerald Wilson, maybe? But maybe not so much. doesn't sound like players he uses, voicings, yes, blend, no.

TRACK FOUR - Duke. "Bourbon Street Jingling Jollies", from New Orleans Suite.One for the ages, imo.So many colors, so much depth to the orchestration, just....beautiful.

TRACK FIVE - hmmmm...sounds like Chico Hamilton + harp and minus Chico...keep waiting for it to turn into something else, but it's not going to, is it...oh wow, an ALTO solo! Norris Turney again? Arthur Blythe? Bobby Watson? Some New London Jazz guy? The sound is identifiable, sorta, but maybe not at this age or in this context, at least not for me? I think I could like it, maybe?

TRACK SIX - Phil Woods? Definitely Phil Woods-ish, but with a touch of Hank Crawford sprinkled on for that Jenny Saykwah aftertaste. Geez, those woodwind voicings are close...no room for error, pitch-wise...oh geez, that IS Phil Woods, that tribute to Oliver Nelson he dod. that explains EVERYTHING, then. It's heartfelt for sure, I mean, how could it not be? Woods saw some of these guys SO up-close and behind the scenes...he knew what he was going on and who he would love, and Oliver Nelson had to have been one of them. That would have explained those voicings too, Woods arranged the album, too, right? So he knew how Nelson worked that,, literally knew from exposure and being in there with it. Ok, Phil Woods, then.

TRACK SEVEN - Randy Weston? Sounds like a band that would have liked to have played together more than they probably actually di...and I mean that as a compliment in the face of economic realities. But no, not Randy Weston? God, i wish that bigger bands had chances to play live regularly, it makes SUCH a difference when you have a band whose spirit is true. Ok, that head is familiar, not sure why they shifted the groove there, it doesn't add anything, really. Muhal, maybe, judging from how it ends up?

TRACK EIGHT - Sounds like Los Angeles. Not that it is, just sounds like that, that post-Kenton thing with a "lab band" type of proficiency/propensity, writing and playing...and recording. I like that when it works, and this works. Don't know that I'd leave the house to hear it, but since I'm not having to do that for this, hey! Saul Goode!

TRACK NINE - Every BFT has at least one "oh crap, I KNOW I've heard this one somewhere before" cut. Here it is. Sounds very much "of its time" and I mean that in the best possible way. Guitar is definitely going for a Dominique Gaumont/Reggie Lucas/Pete Cosey thing, so from that time, and that circle, I'd guess. The obvious guess is Brecker, but that does not sound like Brecker of that time to me, not on the finer points. Interesting...many possibilities, maybe up to and including Teo Macero? Or a record made for the Japanese market? I like it, definitely like it.

TRACK TEN - Almost sounds like three hands, which would make it Buck Hammer? I've never heard his record, and probably still haven't!

TRACK ELEVEN - YEAH! Balanced within itself. This is probably one of those "shoulda carpe-diem-ed when I had the chance" items": https://www.dustygroove.com/item/719497?sf=ray+nance&incl_oos=1&incl_cs=1&kwfilter=ray+nance&sort_order=artisan

TRACK TWELVE - No idea, but surely that's McCoy? Also sounds like one of his compositions, but drawing a blank on the name of it.

TRACK THIRTEEN - not in the mood for this right now..or am I? I think i can be...ok, I will be....and now I am. It's that tempo and that one chord. This is understanding how music works, not just how it sounds or feels, but what you need to do to get it to do all that. And the tenor player is taking their time. Hell, EVERYBODY is.Weighty without being burdensome, quite the opposite.

Pretty damn nice compilation here, and thanks for not includinf Denny McLain!

 

Replies to your comments:

1.This has been identified as Lester Bowie's Brass Fantasy playing a Jimmie Lunceford song. So it is a mixture of older and newer. 

2. It is Fats himself, with another jazz giant on this track too. 

3. It is not Gerald Wilson. That is an interesting comparison to this artist. 

4. Yes, you have identified it. I think that the New Orleans Suite album by Duke Ellington is all just wonderful. 

5. I am surprised that no one has identified this artist yet. Your guesses are not correct. 

6. The artist would be surprised to know that he had been compared to Phil Woods and Oliver Nelson, I believe. 

7. This is not Randy Weston or Muhal Richard Abrams. Your comments are so interesting because this is a band which actually did perform very often together both live and in the studio. 

8. Again, your comments are interesting because the bandleader is from the urban northeast of the United States, and has no Los Angeles connection that I know of.

9. You hit the nail on the head. It is Teo Macero leading the album. It is Michael Brecker on saxophone. I am impressed that you thought of Teo Macero. However, this is from many years later than the mid-1970s era which it is evoking.  

10. It is not Buck Hammer. It is someone who you might not think of playing in this way.

11. Yes, you have identified it!

12. It is a McCoy Tyner composition from an album in his name. 

13. Those are some insightful comments! This is one of my favorite recordings ever by Carla Bley, who has been previously identified. 

16 minutes ago, Milestones said:

Duke with New Orleans Suite....I have not heard that one in ages.  I do recall it having some prominent flute, which is the only record of his for which that is true (as far as I know).

On #11 Ahmed Abdul-Malik makes perfect sense. 

Flute is also prominent on Duke Ellington's "70th Birthday Concert" but not in this arranged way. 

Edited by CardinalJazzFan

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Oh crap, it IS Teo on #9!

This album: https://www.allmusic.com/album/impressions-of-miles-davis-mw0000316061

and yes, I DO have that record, no wonder!!!!

I bought all (or almost all) those Teo records on his label from CD Baby about a decade ago, jsut to see what they all were, because there were a LOT of them! And they turned out to be a pretty interesting lot too.

From what i can tell, since Teo was doing Miles' records, he had a really unique insight into what was being done what that music, not just the playing of it, but in particualr, how the records were being made (because he was the one making them!). Also gotta figure that Teo had some kind of studio time allotteed to him for his own discretionary use (Bob Belden had an arrangement with Blue Note where he'd get paid in studio time for at least some of his other work for the label, and he'd use that time to record his own projects, only a few of which were eve officially released), so there's that.

Access to Miles, access to studio time, you know that automatically means access to players, right?

What really made me add Teo to the guess-mix, though, was the simple sound of the record. It's got that older analogue sound (probably tape hiss out the ass b/c it was certainly not recorded for an actually intended release) and, sorry aobut Paul Metzger, don't really know too much about him, but damn, that dude sounds like he's getting ready to play on "He Loved him Madly", ya' know? That sound. And nobody outside of Miles' immediate orb would have been going there like that. I mean, maybe, but...not really. Teo almost certainly would have had to be within smelling distance of it, if not actually the one making the odor!

But...I've slowly become aware that that last period of pre-retirement Miles had a LOT of ripple effect in the Japanese market. A little bit of it made it out here in the US, but I keep finding (at irregular intervals), these mid-70s Japanese records that have SOME kind of connection. And when felser said Paul Metzger, I started Discog-ing him, the first thing I checked out was a Sam Morrison record, becuase that guy was in Miles' very last live band, and that was part of that ripple effect.

Anyway...yeah. Teo. Teo an deeper than might be thought.

24 minutes ago, CardinalJazzFan said:

6. The artist would be surprised to know that he had been compared to Phil Woods and Oliver Nelson, I believe.

oh god, you know what happened? I youtubed the Phil Woods cut to compare, in seperate tab, and did not shut the BFT off, nor did I start the YT videos. so I'm thinkin a-HA! when in reality...noooooo....

OOOOOOOPS!!!!! :g

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18 minutes ago, JSngry said:

Oh crap, it IS Teo on #9!

This album: https://www.allmusic.com/album/impressions-of-miles-davis-mw0000316061

and yes, I DO have that record, no wonder!!!!

I bought all (or almost all) those Teo records on his label from CD Baby about a decade ago, jsut to see what they all were, because there were a LOT of them! And they turned out to be a pretty interesting lot too.

From what i can tell, since Teo was doing Miles' records, he had a really unique insight into what was being done what that music, not just the playing of it, but in particualr, how the records were being made (because he was the one making them!). Also gotta figure that Teo had some kind of studio time allotteed to him for his own discretionary use (Bob Belden had an arrangement with Blue Note where he'd get paid in studio time for at least some of his other work for the label, and he'd use that time to record his own projects, only a few of which were eve officially released), so there's that.

Access to Miles, access to studio time, you know that automatically means access to players, right?

What really made me add Teo to the guess-mix, though, was the simple sound of the record. It's got that older analogue sound (probably tape hiss out the ass b/c it was certainly not recorded for an actually intended release) and, sorry aobut Paul Metzger, don't really know too much about him, but damn, that dude sounds like he's getting ready to play on "He Loved him Madly", ya' know? That sound. And nobody outside of Miles' immediate orb would have been going there like that. I mean, maybe, but...not really. Teo almost certainly would have had to be within smelling distance of it, if not actually the one making the odor!

But...I've slowly become aware that that last period of pre-retirement Miles had a LOT of ripple effect in the Japanese market. A little bit of it made it out here in the US, but I keep finding (at irregular intervals), these mid-70s Japanese records that have SOME kind of connection. And when felser said Paul Metzger, I started Discog-ing him, the first thing I checked out was a Sam Morrison record, becuase that guy was in Miles' very last live band, and that was part of that ripple effect.

Anyway...yeah. Teo. Teo an deeper than might be thought.

oh god, you know what happened? I youtubed the Phil Woods cut to compare, in seperate tab, and did not shut the BFT off, nor did I start the YT videos. so I'm thinkin a-HA! when in reality...noooooo....

OOOOOOOPS!!!!! :g

Those are some very insightful thoughts about the Teo Macero album. Now that you have articulated them, it strikes me that much of the album has the feeling of someone who was part of the 1970s Miles “immediate orb” as you put it. 
 

That is a funny story about having Phil Woods on hand at the same time! That explains it. 

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#12 is "Theme for Nana" by Tyner with Joe Ford on flute.  The album is Focal Point.

I have this record.  I've been listening to a ton of Tyner's music lately, but had not gotten around to this one.  It looks like it's underrated.  

Good stuff, and thanks for including the great McCoy Tyner.

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34 minutes ago, Milestones said:

#12 is "Theme for Nana" by Tyner with Joe Ford on flute.  The album is Focal Point.

I have this record.  I've been listening to a ton of Tyner's music lately, but had not gotten around to this one.  It looks like it's underrated.  

Good stuff, and thanks for including the great McCoy Tyner.

That is all true. Focal Point is one of my favorite Milestone Tyners. Every track is memorable and performed very well. It is a fun album to listen to. A lot of it is more uptempo than "Theme For Nana."

I saw the  Focal Point band live in the mid-1970s, and it was one of the best McCoy Tyner concerts I ever went to. The band was Joe Ford, Ron Bridgewater, Tyner, Charles Fambrough, Eric Gravatt, Guilherme Franco. (Gary Bartz plays on Focal Point and was not part of the live band when I saw them). 

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Posted (edited)

13 hours ago, CardinalJazzFan said:

Replies to your comments:

(...)

2. It is Fats himself, with another jazz giant on this track too. 

(...)

My goodness... this is "Willow Tree" from the March 27, 1928 session of the Lousiana Sugar Babes. Fats on organ, Garvin Bushell on clarinet, Jabbo Smith on cornet and the greatest of them all, James P. Johnson at the piano. Wonderful selection!

Edited by EKE BBB

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43 minutes ago, EKE BBB said:

My goodness... this is "Willow Tree" from the March 27, 1928 session of the Lousiana Sugar Babes. Fats on organ, Garvin Bushell on clarinet, Jabbo Smith on cornet and the greatest of them all, James P. Johnson at the piano. Wonderful selection!

Yes, you have identified it.

James P. Johnson and Fats Waller on one song, two jazz giants together. 

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Seems to me that Duke owed a lot of his piano style (or at least one of his styles) to Johnson.

 

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Posted (edited)

Here are my thoughts as they occurred to me while listening:

Track 1 - Definitely has an infectious feel to it. Gotta love that walking tuba! This is not normally my kind of thing, but I like this. Holy trombone solo, Batman! Though I was a bit fearful when this track started I gotta admit its won me over! A cool modern version of music from another era. I wouldn't be surprised if some of these guys weren't avant-guardists, actually. Huh, maybe this is even Lester Bowie? I don't know the Brass Fantasy stuff super well, but that would not shock me.

Track 2 - This again is from an era and style I don't typically listen to. I appreciate it but it doesn't reach me as much as some other things do. But I like this overall. Not sure about that organ though.

Track 3 - That's a great trumpet intro, very free and expressive. Oh wow, that's interesting... is that an electronic keyboard? Love the melody line that comes in with the horn & vibes. Really interesting orchestration...this is surprising. I thought it was going to go into a pretty straightforward big band thing but this is taking some really fascinating turns. I really dig this vibes player--that's a hell of a solo, some nice exploring. Trumpet player has a great sound. I think this might be a different trumpet player than who did the intro though? Hmmm...no, maybe not. Ooooh...cello! Hang on, if that's not Diedre Murray I'll eat my hat. Hold everything. It just hit me... is this Muhal?? I don't have this record, but I think I know this...one of his larger group recordings on Black Saint. I need this.

Track 4 - You had me at flute. And now you have me again at: cool feel and horn backgrounds. This sounds vaguely Gerald Wilson-esque to me, but maybe that's because I just listened to some Gerald Wilson last night. I like this. Changing my mind about Wilson, he usually features more soloists and this seems to be all about the flute player, who is very good. Nice track.

Track 5 - So, fantastic piano intro, into... harp and cello, alright! And more flute, yeah that ain't bad. What a lush sound on this track. As it goes on, it's very pleasant but it's not totally grabbing me in terms of emotional impact. Ah, it finally really starts cooking at the 7 minute mark where they change up the feel-- suddenly the horn player is on fire and the whole thing lights up. I kinda wish they had done that a few minutes ago! :)

Track 6 - I had to start this one over because I realized I was spacing out. There's a LOT going on here. I'm both intrigued by the arrangement and also feel like there's a bit too much going on. There's no space here at all, nothing to grab on to. I don't know what's going on with all those horn backgrounds...there's just way too much and they stick out like a sore thumb, leaving no room for the soloist or anything... yeah...I dunno...this is not working for me.

Track 7 - I love the piano player's approach on the intro--rootsy, not too flashy, just right. Reminds me of Waldron or Tapscott. Not sure that I absolutely love the composition, but the solos are fantastic. And here we come to the piano again, wow... yeah, I'm guessing the pianist must be the leader. That's where I'm hearing the overall concept coming from anyway. Again, holy trombone Batman! That's badass. Whoa. Definitely wasn't prepared for that change, just after the 5 min mark. Can't tell if that was really necessary. Overall I really like this track and this group though!

Track 8 - This is a bit too over-produced for me, it almost has that GRP kind of feeling to it. A bit hipper than that, but I mean it's just too clean and "safe" I guess. The band is a little too uptight and the drummer's sense of swing is definitely not the same as mine. This one just isn't for me.

Track 9 - The sax player sounds familiar to me. Definitely a unique group sound here, I'm having trouble placing it in context...the sax player sounds more contemporary/smooth leaning, then there's the Bitches Brew-esque guitar, effected keys, the chordal stuff going on in the electric bass...I'm not sure what to make of this. There are hints of a "grittier" direction and that's what I'm trying to latch onto. I think I'm much more interested in what the rhythm section is doing than I am in the sax player, who definitely has a confident sound, but isn't really telling me a story and just doesn't seem to fit here. The guitarist, on the other hand, IS going somewhere. That's a great solo. I think this would be a much stronger track without the saxophonist. I hear a great group plus maybe a "guest saxophonist" who doesn't fit in, to my ears.

Track 10 - This is fun. Older style but it sounds like a more modern player. Not a style I'm super familiar with, but this is enjoyable.

Track 11 - Cool instrumentation, once again. I do like the violinist a lot, and he/she sounds vaguely familiar somehow. I dig the subdued feel of this, it cooks along nicely. The piano solo is very tasty indeed. Okay, that other instrument, what is that...is that a kora? Really great flute solo at the end. This is pure class. It alternately sounds like something from around 1960, and then something from this decade. Really love this track.

Track 12 - You like flute, and so do I. :) This is a nice track with a bit of a spiritual feel to it, I love the sections where they hang out on the pedal and it builds. Very Tyner-esque. Okay, hang on-- that IS The Real McCoy. Hell yes...this is really good. No guess on the other players. I like the drummer's feel a lot, the production is a bit interesting in the bass drum department, which makes me think Cobham or someone like that, but I dunno...it actually doesn't really sound like him. Anyway, this is great.

Track 13 - That's definitely Steve Swallow on bass. This must be Carla Bley. I'm no expert, but it has that feel to it. I've had trouble getting into her stuff, but I think that's my own personal problem honestly. This is a really nice track. She has such a strong concept and sound. Even if it doesn't always appeal to me personally, I have a lot of respect for it. Sometimes I just have to make myself sit down and listen to it. I love what's BETWEEN the notes here, that's where the interest is. 

Some really great stuff here, a diverse and engaging set of music for sure! Thanks so much for your efforts in putting this together! 
 

10 mins later: Oh wow, now that I see what has been guessed... that doesn't seem surprising on #11 at all. Based on this, and what little bits I've heard from him before, I definitely need to check more of his stuff out. Can't believe I didn't get #4! And I now know why the sax player on #9 didn't speak to me at all... :)

Edited by webbcity

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Posted (edited)

This is a really good BFT, Cardinal Jazz Fan. I will post some detailed comments later in the month but I want to let you know that I am enjoying it. 

 

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, Hot Ptah said:

This is a really good BFT, Cardinal Jazz Fan. I will post some detailed comments later in the month but I want to let you know that I am enjoying it. 

 

Thank you. I appreciate your nice thoughts and look forward to your comments. I also want to thank you for letting me use your office today in my working visit to Kansas City while you are working from home! 

Edited by CardinalJazzFan

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On 4/6/2020 at 2:47 PM, webbcity said:

Here are my thoughts as they occurred to me while listening:

Track 1 - Definitely has an infectious feel to it. Gotta love that walking tuba! This is not normally my kind of thing, but I like this. Holy trombone solo, Batman! Though I was a bit fearful when this track started I gotta admit its won me over! A cool modern version of music from another era. I wouldn't be surprised if some of these guys weren't avant-guardists, actually. Huh, maybe this is even Lester Bowie? I don't know the Brass Fantasy stuff super well, but that would not shock me.

Reply--You figured out it was Lester Bowie. 

Track 2 - This again is from an era and style I don't typically listen to. I appreciate it but it doesn't reach me as much as some other things do. But I like this overall. Not sure about that organ though.

Reply--and the organist is an all time jazz great. This shows how Blindfold Tests can produce unfiltered opinions

 

On 4/6/2020 at 2:47 PM, webbcity said:

Track 3 - That's a great trumpet intro, very free and expressive. Oh wow, that's interesting... is that an electronic keyboard? Love the melody line that comes in with the horn & vibes. Really interesting orchestration...this is surprising. I thought it was going to go into a pretty straightforward big band thing but this is taking some really fascinating turns. I really dig this vibes player--that's a hell of a solo, some nice exploring. Trumpet player has a great sound. I think this might be a different trumpet player than who did the intro though? Hmmm...no, maybe not. Ooooh...cello! Hang on, if that's not Diedre Murray I'll eat my hat. Hold everything. It just hit me... is this Muhal?? I don't have this record, but I think I know this...one of his larger group recordings on Black Saint. I need this.

Reply--you are the first to correctly identify the artist and label,

Track 4 - You had me at flute. And now you have me again at: cool feel and horn backgrounds. This sounds vaguely Gerald Wilson-esque to me, but maybe that's because I just listened to some Gerald Wilson last night. I like this. Changing my mind about Wilson, he usually features more soloists and this seems to be all about the flute player, who is very good. Nice track.

Reply--it is a nice track, and some Ellington which sounds different from a lot of his recordings. 

Track 5 - So, fantastic piano intro, into... harp and cello, alright! And more flute, yeah that ain't bad. What a lush sound on this track. As it goes on, it's very pleasant but it's not totally grabbing me in terms of emotional impact. Ah, it finally really starts cooking at the 7 minute mark where they change up the feel-- suddenly the horn player is on fire and the whole thing lights up. I kinda wish they had done that a few minutes ago! :)

Reply--I like this too. i am surprised that no  one has identified this. 

On 4/6/2020 at 2:47 PM, webbcity said:

Track 6 - I had to start this one over because I realized I was spacing out. There's a LOT going on here. I'm both intrigued by the arrangement and also feel like there's a bit too much going on. There's no space here at all, nothing to grab on to. I don't know what's going on with all those horn backgrounds...there's just way too much and they stick out like a sore thumb, leaving no room for the soloist or anything... yeah...I dunno...this is not working for me.

Reply--I included this partly because I was curious how different people would react to it. 

Track 7 - I love the piano player's approach on the intro--rootsy, not too flashy, just right. Reminds me of Waldron or Tapscott. Not sure that I absolutely love the composition, but the solos are fantastic. And here we come to the piano again, wow... yeah, I'm guessing the pianist must be the leader. That's where I'm hearing the overall concept coming from anyway. Again, holy trombone Batman! That's badass. Whoa. Definitely wasn't prepared for that change, just after the 5 min mark. Can't tell if that was really necessary. Overall I really like this track and this group though!

Reply---the pianist is not the leader. I like this group very much. 

Track 8 - This is a bit too over-produced for me, it almost has that GRP kind of feeling to it. A bit hipper than that, but I mean it's just too clean and "safe" I guess. The band is a little too uptight and the drummer's sense of swing is definitely not the same as mine. This one just isn't for me.

Reply--i actually am in agreement that this is kind of clean and safe. But the energy brings me back to it. But it is on the edge of being too safe for me. 

Track 9 - The sax player sounds familiar to me. Definitely a unique group sound here, I'm having trouble placing it in context...the sax player sounds more contemporary/smooth leaning, then there's the Bitches Brew-esque guitar, effected keys, the chordal stuff going on in the electric bass...I'm not sure what to make of this. There are hints of a "grittier" direction and that's what I'm trying to latch onto. I think I'm much more interested in what the rhythm section is doing than I am in the sax player, who definitely has a confident sound, but isn't really telling me a story and just doesn't seem to fit here. The guitarist, on the other hand, IS going somewhere. That's a great solo. I think this would be a much stronger track without the saxophonist. I hear a great group plus maybe a "guest saxophonist" who doesn't fit in, to my ears.

Reply--I see that you later read the identification of this by others. The guitar solo is my favorite part of this track. 

Track 10 - This is fun. Older style but it sounds like a more modern player. Not a style I'm super familiar with, but this is enjoyable.

Reply--i think that the Reveal for this track will surprise many. 

On 4/6/2020 at 2:47 PM, webbcity said:

Track 11 - Cool instrumentation, once again. I do like the violinist a lot, and he/she sounds vaguely familiar somehow. I dig the subdued feel of this, it cooks along nicely. The piano solo is very tasty indeed. Okay, that other instrument, what is that...is that a kora? Really great flute solo at the end. This is pure class. It alternately sounds like something from around 1960, and then something from this decade. Really love this track.

Reply--I love this track too, and your comments are spot on. 

Track 12 - You like flute, and so do I. :) This is a nice track with a bit of a spiritual feel to it, I love the sections where they hang out on the pedal and it builds. Very Tyner-esque. Okay, hang on-- that IS The Real McCoy. Hell yes...this is really good. No guess on the other players. I like the drummer's feel a lot, the production is a bit interesting in the bass drum department, which makes me think Cobham or someone like that, but I dunno...it actually doesn't really sound like him. Anyway, this is great.

Reply--It is Eric Gravatt on drums. This is from a Tyner album which may have been lost in the shuffle of his many Milestone albums, but which I think is one of the best of them. 

Track 13 - That's definitely Steve Swallow on bass. This must be Carla Bley. I'm no expert, but it has that feel to it. I've had trouble getting into her stuff, but I think that's my own personal problem honestly. This is a really nice track. She has such a strong concept and sound. Even if it doesn't always appeal to me personally, I have a lot of respect for it. Sometimes I just have to make myself sit down and listen to it. I love what's BETWEEN the notes here, that's where the interest is. 

Reply--This track is one of my favorite Carla Bley recordings. 

Some really great stuff here, a diverse and engaging set of music for sure! Thanks so much for your efforts in putting this together! 
 

10 mins later: Oh wow, now that I see what has been guessed... that doesn't seem surprising on #11 at all. Based on this, and what little bits I've heard from him before, I definitely need to check more of his stuff out. Can't believe I didn't get #4! And I now know why the sax player on #9 didn't speak to me at all... :)

Reply--Thanks for the nice comments. The other recordings of Ahmed Abdul-Malik are very much worth checking out. 

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I'm pretty sure I used to have Focal Point! Not sure what happened to it. Gone with a few other things that have mysteriously disappeared over the years...

Thanks for your responses. There are a few cuts here I may go back to and try to guess at again. Lots of great listening here!

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Oh how I wish this post were more positive, as the compiler reached out to let me know that his BFT was going to be mainstream, and encouraged me to give it a listen.

I don't disagree with his description, of course, but I really only liked 7 & 8. Otherwise nothing else stood out to me, I have no guesses (no real surprise there), and there was too much flute.

YMMV of course.

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25 minutes ago, Dan Gould said:

Oh how I wish this post were more positive, as the compiler reached out to let me know that his BFT was going to be mainstream, and encouraged me to give it a listen.

I don't disagree with his description, of course, but I really only liked 7 & 8. Otherwise nothing else stood out to me, I have no guesses (no real surprise there), and there was too much flute.

YMMV of course.

Dan, you and I both liked the same two cuts!  The sky must be falling!  Yes, too much flute, this BFT needs more cowbell!

More Cowbell and More “Saturday Night Live” – NBC 7 San Diego

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1 hour ago, felser said:

Dan, you and I both liked the same two cuts!  The sky must be falling!  

Well these are strange and difficult times Mr. Felser.

 

:g

 

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