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tkeith

BFT196 Link & Discussion

35 posts in this topic

I've been wanting to say Sal Nistico, but I know of no record like this.

No, not Sal, and not Billy. And not Charles Lloyd.

damn good tenor player, whoever it is.

Oh my god, that's J.R. Monterose!!!!!!!!

Well then, no wonder! :g

 

 

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and this dodgamn thing is only on LP? and mp3?

This all makes sense now, mature person, mature player who kept evolving away from the public eye, yeah. 5 Stars - for every second of music, and then 5 more starts for every group of 5 stars, all the stars that there are stars for this one.

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10 hours ago, tkeith said:

#10

You should.  Not Bluiett, but this guy would be flattered by the comp, but also has very much his own thing.

I'm not at all familiar with Alex Harding (or the trumpet and cello players), good introduction.

Give it another spin.  I'll be surprised if you don't own this.

I don own it.  Very strange album for him, though not without appeal.  Never would have expected him to record for ECM.

I agree about what has happened to the guitar sound -- give me Grant Green!  You have nailed everything about this except what it is.  And you're more right than you can fathom.

OK, I'm intrigued!

 

 

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That George Adams ECM record works. It just works.

You know, in spite of "ECM", you got Jack DeJohnette lighting a fire up under everybody's ass on a lot of those records. No matter what Eicher did to it sonically, it's always there. and on this one, it seems like it let it ride (no pun intended) maybe a little more than usual.

and Heinz Sauer was a for real player, total cred. Him and Adams make for an attractive combination, on this cut almost in a Trane/Pharoah way, Sauer lights it up pretty good, and then Adams goes up even one tenor notch higher and gets it done..

Like I said, it works.

 

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On 7/3/2020 at 2:06 PM, JSngry said:

I've been wanting to say Sal Nistico, but I know of no record like this.

No, not Sal, and not Billy. And not Charles Lloyd.

damn good tenor player, whoever it is.

Oh my god, that's J.R. Monterose!!!!!!!!

Well then, no wonder! :g

 

 

Ding! Ding!

On 7/4/2020 at 9:12 PM, JSngry said:

That George Adams ECM record works. It just works.

You know, in spite of "ECM", you got Jack DeJohnette lighting a fire up under everybody's ass on a lot of those records. No matter what Eicher did to it sonically, it's always there. and on this one, it seems like it let it ride (no pun intended) maybe a little more than usual.

and Heinz Sauer was a for real player, total cred. Him and Adams make for an attractive combination, on this cut almost in a Trane/Pharoah way, Sauer lights it up pretty good, and then Adams goes up even one tenor notch higher and gets it done..

Like I said, it works.

 

Agreed.  I came slowly to Heinz, always preferring George (Remember,  I was probably 13 when I bought this).  But, over time, I really came to appreciate him. 

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2nd half tracks: 

7. Sax & piano opening is smooth as silk. Drums & bass sneak up and fit right in. Perfect quartet playing because it all moves so well together. Absolutely love this tune. 

8. Piano sets the path at the beginning. Then the sax, drums and bass come in right over. A little smoother tone on the sax here than in song 7. Still - fantastic quartet playing and a great recording. Man, these two songs are just wonderful. 

9. A bass intro like this lets you know - this song is gonna be good. And it is. Recording struggles a bit - sounds like the drums were recorded in another room down the hall. But damn, that trumpet (or flugelhorn?) is perfect. Sounds like a Coltrane Quartet rhythm but with brass instead of woodwind. The piano solo is epic, and I'm wondering if the recording quality diminishes the experience because the rest of the rhythm section behind doesn't gel with it quite like the earlier 2 tracks - almost like the piano is playing their own tune for a while separate from the rest - but I think it could be because the band gets buried a bit. I love the following bass solo with the drums playing along though. When it all comes back together around the 10 minute mark it's a real beautiful moment. I don't usually harp on recording quality because I don't have audiophile equipment but I'll say here that a better mastering would probably reveal this song to be the masterpiece it is. 

10. Oh yeah - love the bari sax/trumpet duo over the drums and bass. Great solos and a great tune. 

11. Some really great selections in this whole BFT. I love this one too. It just keeps building the intensity and the playing is awesome. Tension released at about 4 mins by the piano and then the trumpet comes back in. Whoever is playing that trumpet is masterful. Sax player really blows the doors off as well. 

12. Damn - lovely. The percussion and guitar make this one for me, along with the sax player's tone. Beautiful. What a groover! 

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On 7/7/2020 at 0:23 PM, Dub Modal said:

2nd half tracks: 

7. Sax & piano opening is smooth as silk. Drums & bass sneak up and fit right in. Perfect quartet playing because it all moves so well together. Absolutely love this tune. 

Yep.  ID'd by JSangry.

On 7/7/2020 at 0:23 PM, Dub Modal said:

8. Piano sets the path at the beginning. Then the sax, drums and bass come in right over. A little smoother tone on the sax here than in song 7. Still - fantastic quartet playing and a great recording. Man, these two songs are just wonderful. 

This one is a personal favorite, but I don't expect anyone to get it.

On 7/7/2020 at 0:23 PM, Dub Modal said:

9. A bass intro like this lets you know - this song is gonna be good. And it is. Recording struggles a bit - sounds like the drums were recorded in another room down the hall. But damn, that trumpet (or flugelhorn?) is perfect. Sounds like a Coltrane Quartet rhythm but with brass instead of woodwind. The piano solo is epic, and I'm wondering if the recording quality diminishes the experience because the rest of the rhythm section behind doesn't gel with it quite like the earlier 2 tracks - almost like the piano is playing their own tune for a while separate from the rest - but I think it could be because the band gets buried a bit. I love the following bass solo with the drums playing along though. When it all comes back together around the 10 minute mark it's a real beautiful moment. I don't usually harp on recording quality because I don't have audiophile equipment but I'll say here that a better mastering would probably reveal this song to be the masterpiece it is. 

Agreed.  A great tune, masterful in it's simplicity.  I'm a big fan of this trumpeter.

On 7/7/2020 at 0:23 PM, Dub Modal said:

10. Oh yeah - love the bari sax/trumpet duo over the drums and bass. Great solos and a great tune. 

These guys are currently where it's at, IMHO.

On 7/7/2020 at 0:23 PM, Dub Modal said:

11. Some really great selections in this whole BFT. I love this one too. It just keeps building the intensity and the playing is awesome. Tension released at about 4 mins by the piano and then the trumpet comes back in. Whoever is playing that trumpet is masterful. Sax player really blows the doors off as well. 

You're not wrong about the trumpeter.  This has been ID'd.

On 7/7/2020 at 0:23 PM, Dub Modal said:

12. Damn - lovely. The percussion and guitar make this one for me, along with the sax player's tone. Beautiful. What a groover! 

A few have found this a bit too poppy, and ordinarily, I would agree.  But this one is such an earworm that I can't NOT love it.

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12 minutes ago, tkeith said:

A few have found this a bit too poppy, and ordinarily, I would agree.  But this one is such an earworm that I can't NOT love it.

Mad props to whoever it is on percussion. I can't wait to find out who. Just outstanding playing. 

I tried not to read anyone else's posts before doing mine so that I could give them all a fresh ear. I saw later that some of them were ID'd and have to say I admire those that can pick out players and tunes like that. 

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I really like this BFT. Most of it is right up my alley. Many of the drummers on this BFT, if not influenced directly by Elvin Jones, would not play the way that they do except that they have heard Elvin Jones.

1. This Is Charles Mingus' composition "Weird Nightmare," which I know from his "Mingus Revisited" album. The singer sounds like an instrumentalist taking a turn with a rare vocal. He is not really a polished singer. Maybe he is the bandleader. Still, his vocal is moving. I like the trombone solo. I am not familiar with a large ensemble which has ever recorded something like this. At least not that I can remember.

2. I really like the arrangement and instruments used here. It is not the usual mainstream approach. Is that a xylophone (instead of a marimba or vibes)? That is really interesting to me toward the end when the entire ensemble comes in and gets louder. This reminds me of post-2000 local Chicago bands.

3. Whoever this is, I like it! I like the groove and the saxophone player's tone and approach. I have no idea who it is. I am looking forward to the Reveal on this one.

4. "Little Melonae". Miles'  version always comes to my mind when I hear this composition. I had an LP, "Basic Miles," with a nice version of it. I don't know who this is. I like the rougher approach of the group and especially the saxophonist--not so polished like some jazz recordings.

5. Now that is a unique take on "Lush Life." I have no idea who it is, but this is very appealing to me.

6. Ah, this was on a Blindfold Test by my old friend Cardinal Jazz Fan. I remember because he asked me before he finalized his test if it would be too familiar to everyone. Looking back it was on BFT 163. It is "Hello Little Girl," the closing track from Duke Ellington's "Jazz Party" album, with Jimmy Jones on piano, Dizzy Gillespie on the trumpet solo, and Jimmy Rushing on vocals. The liner notes to the LP state that this was a totally unplanned jam which developed spontaneously in the studio.

I have played this track over 200 times in my life, easily. It was a real favorite of mine in my first burst of jazz enthusiasm in the 1970s and I have always enjoyed it a lot. 

7.  "My Old Flame." That is some excellent tenor sax playing, great tone and ideas. I don't know who it is. I want to know!

8.  This sounds very much like the later Atlantic recordings of John Coltrane. They get the feeling of those recordings, not just the notes. I have no idea who it is, but I like this a lot and again, I want to know!

9. This is a great track. The drummer has heard a lot of Elvin Jones in his life, which is all good! The trumpet player is so compelling, so memorable. I want to get this album. I am pretty sure I don't have it!

10. I love this but have no idea who it is. Great feeling and approach, just the kind of music I like.

11. That is George Adams from his "Sound Suggestions" album, one of my all time favorites, which I have played a great many times. That is Jack DeJohnette and Dave Holland, Richard Beirach, Kenny Wheeler and Heinz Sauer also on tenor saxophone. This was the first track on Side 2 of the LP I played over and over when this album was first released. Looking it up, that means the song title is "Stay Informed." Simply great.

12. I like this. It is almost too cheery, like it is insanely cheery. But the baritone sax player has a lot of soul to his approach. His gritty sound and style contrast nicely with the sugary sweet background. I used to guess Azar Lawrence every time there was a Coltrane influenced tenor saxophonist on a 1970s sounding album. Rarely was it actually Azar Lawrence.  Now I guess Ronnie Cuber whenever I hear bluesy baritone sax with a lot of technique. It is often not Ronnie. But this could be him.

Great BFT! I thoroughly enjoyed it!.

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2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

I really like this BFT. Most of it is right up my alley.

Glad to hear it.

2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

1. This Is Charles Mingus' composition "Weird Nightmare," which I know from his "Mingus Revisited" album. The singer sounds like an instrumentalist taking a turn with a rare vocal. He is not really a polished singer. Maybe he is the bandleader. Still, his vocal is moving. I like the trombone solo. I am not familiar with a large ensemble which has ever recorded something like this. At least not that I can remember.

Spot on.

2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

2. I really like the arrangement and instruments used here. It is not the usual mainstream approach. Is that a xylophone (instead of a marimba or vibes)? That is really interesting to me toward the end when the entire ensemble comes in and gets louder. This reminds me of post-2000 local Chicago bands.

This one is going to surprise some people.

2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

3. Whoever this is, I like it! I like the groove and the saxophone player's tone and approach. I have no idea who it is. I am looking forward to the Reveal on this one.

This one is a must have.

2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

4. "Little Melonae". Miles'  version always comes to my mind when I hear this composition. I had an LP, "Basic Miles," with a nice version of it. I don't know who this is. I like the rougher approach of the group and especially the saxophonist--not so polished like some jazz recordings.

That's this guy.

2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

5. Now that is a unique take on "Lush Life." I have no idea who it is, but this is very appealing to me.

I kind of figured that would happen.  :D

 

2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

6. Ah, this was on a Blindfold Test by my old friend Cardinal Jazz Fan. I remember because he asked me before he finalized his test if it would be too familiar to everyone. Looking back it was on BFT 163. It is "Hello Little Girl," the closing track from Duke Ellington's "Jazz Party" album, with Jimmy Jones on piano, Dizzy Gillespie on the trumpet solo, and Jimmy Rushing on vocals. The liner notes to the LP state that this was a totally unplanned jam which developed spontaneously in the studio.

I have played this track over 200 times in my life, easily. It was a real favorite of mine in my first burst of jazz enthusiasm in the 1970s and I have always enjoyed it a lot. 

I missed it when I searched the thread for the song, but I do remember it (because I had decided to use it and scrubbed that choice).  No matter -- never a wrong time for Ellington.

2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

7.  "My Old Flame." That is some excellent tenor sax playing, great tone and ideas. I don't know who it is. I want to know!

Yes, you do want to know.  Jim ID'd it.

2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

8.  This sounds very much like the later Atlantic recordings of John Coltrane. They get the feeling of those recordings, not just the notes. I have no idea who it is, but I like this a lot and again, I want to know!

I'm glad to bring people something new, but I wish more people were aware of this guy.

2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

9. This is a great track. The drummer has heard a lot of Elvin Jones in his life, which is all good! The trumpet player is so compelling, so memorable. I want to get this album. I am pretty sure I don't have it!

Likely not.

2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

10. I love this but have no idea who it is. Great feeling and approach, just the kind of music I like.

Agreed.  You'll be pleased.

2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

11. That is George Adams from his "Sound Suggestions" album, one of my all time favorites, which I have played a great many times. That is Jack DeJohnette and Dave Holland, Richard Beirach, Kenny Wheeler and Heinz Sauer also on tenor saxophone. This was the first track on Side 2 of the LP I played over and over when this album was first released. Looking it up, that means the song title is "Stay Informed." Simply great.

Bang on!

2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

12. I like this. It is almost too cheery, like it is insanely cheery. But the baritone sax player has a lot of soul to his approach. His gritty sound and style contrast nicely with the sugary sweet background. I used to guess Azar Lawrence every time there was a Coltrane influenced tenor saxophonist on a 1970s sounding album. Rarely was it actually Azar Lawrence.  Now I guess Ronnie Cuber whenever I hear bluesy baritone sax with a lot of technique. It is often not Ronnie. But this could be him.

Could be and is.

2 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

Great BFT! I thoroughly enjoyed it!.

Glad to hear it.

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