Peter Friedman

Listening Patterns

14 posts in this topic

Over the years I have observed here that there seems to be two basic types of listening patterns to classical music recordings.

Some most often tend to listen to an entire CD /LP.  For example, if the recording has 3 Haydn String Quartets, or 2 Beethoven Symphonies, the person will play through the entire CD / LP.

Others tend to pick and choose, and often do not play the entire recording at one time. For example, that person will play one of the Haydn String Quartets on the recording and then perhaps play one of the Beethoven symphonies.

I usually (though there are exceptions) fall into the second group.  I generally prefer to listen to a variety of classical music in one setting rather than listen to , for example, one Beethoven Symphony right after another.

One approach is not better than another, just different.

Any thoughts? 

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are you talking about in the car or at home?

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Other than playing new acquisitions, I tend to listen in bunches - Maybe Red Allen, maybe a couple of pieces by Suk. Some of this results in both of your scenarios.

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Just now, Larry Kart said:

I use a dowsing rod.

Doesn't that lead to the drowsy nod?

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33 minutes ago, Chuck Nessa said:

Doesn't that lead to the drowsy nod?

Sometimes when listening to Morton Feldman.

And I like Feldman, when I'm in the right mood and haven't eaten a  heavy meal.

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Depends on my mood .... usually not in bunches but if either an artist or composer pricks up my ears I follow trough ....

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I am referring to listening at home. I play nothing only jazz in the car.

For some reason, I listen to an entire jazz CD in one sitting unless time intrudes and I have to stop.

But with classical music, I most often just play one piece  by a composer, and then a piece by another composer.

An exception is when the pieces are all quite short (just a few minutes long), then I may listen to an entire CD by that composer. Chopin's Nocturnes would be a good example.

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28 minutes ago, Peter Friedman said:

An exception is when the pieces are all quite short (just a few minutes long), then I may listen to an entire CD by that composer. Chopin's Nocturnes would be a good example.

So you listen to all the Webern in one session?

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16 hours ago, Chuck Nessa said:

So you listen to all the Webern in one session?

Ha ha

I will leave the enjoyment of Webern to you, while I will get my musical pleasure elsewhere.

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Monotheistic saturation.  And then on to the next deity.

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great to see young people (the Barbican String Quartet) rocking Webern op 5

 

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2 minutes ago, MomsMobley said:

great to see young people (the Barbican String Quartet) rocking Webern op 5

 

As for myself, I was historically put off by some music of this era (especially Webern) because it didn't hear the feeling in it. Time having passed, I've heard a lot of this music played by younger groups and they do indeed rock it. I wonder if maybe so many of the older performers were still figuring out what it all "meant" and now enough time has passed for younger people to have known it all their lives, and therefore be able to come at it with a degree or three of non-separation that helps make it, for lack of a better term, "warmer" emotionally. Same thing for listeners too. like anything else, something can only be "strange" or "unfamiliar" for so long. at some point, if you don't start hearing it (which is not the same as "liking" it), it's not the music's fault.

I've heard so many variants on the "I intentionally played wrong notes on a Schoenberg thing and nobody noticed" smirkboast that hey - maybe not, but if you did that around people who really knew it, they would notice, and your ass would be out of the gig. That's how it should be, that's how it is now in most places, I think, at least places where it would be happening to begin with.

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When I am really into the music one symphony or one piano sonata leaves me sated like the italian wedding lunches you see in the Soprano's.

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