dicky

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  1. Bob Dylan corner

    I felt similarly many years ago. Listening to one of the Bootleg releases, Tell Tale Signs, changed everything. He's as extraordinary as he ever was, and I now listen to and enjoy his latter day recordings more than the earlier stuff. Meet Bob half way and you'll be justly rewarded. The second to last line in Murder Most Foul namechecks Bud Powell! Even cooler, the lyric is - "Play Love Me or Leave Me by the great Bud Powell". Bud, insofar as I know, never actually recorded Love Me or Leave Me but I think borrowed the chords for his "Get It" on "Swingin WIth Bud". Dylan's got big ears.
  2. Jaki Byard: "Anything For Jazz"

    The only time I was fortunate enough to see Jaki live was as a sideman for a Ricky Ford led gig at Sweet Basil sometime in the '90's. I had a few Ford discs but I went to see Jaki. Ronnie Burrage was on drums but I don't recall the bass player. I had dragged two friends to the set, one of which was the drummer of a pop/rock group who's 1990 debut had been highly acclaimed. Jaki took ill midway through the set and had to be led out on a stretcher. I never had the opportunity to see him again. Nor have I seen Ricky again, which is a great shame. My friend, who had never prior attended a live jazz performance commented after the set something to the effect that he was ashamed to call himself a drummer. Ronnie Burrage left quite the impression. I wonder whatever happened to him. In any event, Jaki is timeless and remains one of my favorites.
  3. RIP Orson Bean

    A nice tribute via Mark Steyn... https://www.steynonline.com/10039/bean-there-done-that "As it is, in seven decades as magician, comedian, actor, author and more, Orson Bean had done pretty much everything he ever wanted to. He had been on television more or less since there was a television to be on, and was sufficiently in demand two-thirds of a century later to be guesting on "Modern Family", "Desperate Housewives" and "How I Met Your Mother". In between he starred on Broadway with Jayne Mansfield and Walter Matthau in Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?, on the big screen in Being John Malkovich, in "The Twilight Zone" as a memorable Mr Bevis, and minded the store in "Dr Quinn, Medicine Woman". He was a memorable witness for Jimmy Stewart in Anatomy of a Murder, a hippie in Australia, the head of a school modeled on England's Summerhill (which gave us Rebecca De Mornay and Elton John's record producer), and the father-in-law of Andrew Breitbart. Orson was a master raconteur beloved by Jack Paar and Johnny Carson, which is why he made over two hundred appearances on "The Tonight Show" - until the new guys took over and witty anecdotalists were replaced by grunting pluggers. As he bemoaned to me, these days the bookers mainly want old people who can talk dirty - the potty-mouthed grampa shtick - but, on the other hand, he could more than hold his own at that: a couple of years back in Hollywood, I saw him deliver an almost spectacularly bad-taste stand-up routine. "
  4. Jazz musicians who play out of tune

    I recognize that. And I always read with great interest anything you write or report. I'm fairly certain you meant 1992 rather '82. Assuming '92, Spaulding still hung in there (and pocketed the cash) with Murray for quite a while.
  5. Jazz musicians who play out of tune

    It would appear Spaulding recorded with Murray from 1987's "Hope Scope" until the 1999 recorded "Octet Plays Trane". A total of 6 albums plus an appearance on a WSQ recording. That's a long time to hate the gig. I saw Spaulding on several occasions with Murray's Octet and Big Band. David always went out of his way when introducing the musicians to make a big deal out of Spaulding. It was evident he was especially proud to have him in the group.
  6. LAVERN BAKER SINGS BESSIE SMITH

    That's a sensational recording with a not too shabby supporting cast... Arranged By – Ernie Wilkins, Nat Pierce, Phil Moore (2) Baritone Saxophone – Jerome Richardson, Sahib Shihab Bass – Wendell Marshall Drums – Joe Marshall Guitar – Danny Barker Piano – Nat Pierce Tenor Saxophone – Paul Quinichette Trombone – Jimmy Cleveland, Urbie Green, Vic Dickenson Trumpet – Buck Clayton Vocals – LaVern Baker I have it on a 2-fer with her Precious Memories album, which is always wonderful and at times stunning.
  7. Ringo is left handed. That, I think, largely contributes to his unique approach and time. Otherwise, they we're all spectacular. Bands are magical things. That they "came together" and wound up with George Martin was kismet to the nth degree.
  8. Athletes who were/are jazz fans

    Bob Gibson https://www.si.com/mlb/2017/10/05/year-of-the-pitcher-book-excerpt-bob-gibson-world-series "Gibson sat off to the side—drinking, not spilling, champagne. The night before, he’d gone to hear Les McCann play jazz piano. Now McCann entered the locker room, his fist raised, yelling, “Black Power!” Gibson had little use for such sentiments—his power was his, and his alone—but he’d showed them what Jackie Robinson and Willie Mays and scores of Negro players could have accomplished had they teamed up with Johnny Pesky and Ted Williams."
  9. Repairing scratched CDs

    First try extracting to a hard drive. If there's still anomalies/skips try some moderately rubbed in Lemon Pledge with a cloth or paper towel on the back of the disc. Really.
  10. Jerry González RIP

    I first saw the Fort Apache band at Nightstage in Cambridge, MA with "guest soloist" Dizzy Gillespie around the late '80s. To see Diz so up close was extraordinary, but the band was equally exciting. Subsequently saw the group in NY on several occasions including a Christmas Eve performance at Sweet Basil that will always stay with me. So much music emanated from the stage when that group performed. They were a treasure. What a terrible loss.
  11. I don't think so. He's merely stating the obvious. From the article... "It’s more than likely that the incompatibility of a late 19th-century house, with early 20th-century wiring and the power needs of modern movie lighting, played some part in this catastrophe." That's exactly what a friend and I - who collectively spent many dozens of nights/early mornings at St. Nick's - immediately suspected.
  12. Marantz amp problem, sudden "gargly" sound

    No "reset" was required. I just got in the habit of listening to Miles without EQ and as I upgraded my gear, slowly weaned myself from using it in general. I'm computer/file based now and the only time I use EQ (or DSP) is when listening to boots. And even then I'm careful to make sure the output gain is reduced to compensate for any EQ I apply that might cause clipping.
  13. Marantz amp problem, sudden "gargly" sound

    No, the speakers. They were late 80's B&W's (CM 1 CM2 - https://www.google.com/search?q=b%26w+cm1+cm2&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwicpLW3t7LWAhWHKiYKHZwGAhkQ_AUICygC&biw=1018&bih=550). The Miles Tokyo disc with Sam Rivers would shut them down every time because I was using a mild smiley face EQ . I presume it was a built-in protective mechanism which Larry's speakers apparently didn't possess. And, again, it was only Miles. Diz, Don Cherry, Roy, etc., never had the same effect. Nor for that matter did Terry Gibbs.
  14. Marantz amp problem, sudden "gargly" sound

    A mono Miles album with the treble turned up could have been the culprit. His piercing trumpet, with or without harmon mute, used to regularly cause my B&W's to shut down when I employed an EQ in the chain.