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couw

BLINDFOLD TEST #5 - answers

156 posts in this topic

You may though and if not, I have added another post to my counter :g

No use, you'll never catch up! ;)

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You may though and if not, I have added another post to my counter :g

No use, you'll never catch up! ;)

now, here I was, noting that Master Mike has posted on my BF Thread. I click the link and what do I see instead of an interesting exposé on one of the selections? Yet another post merely serving to increase Mike's post count. :angry:

;)

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Anything you can do ..... :g

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They're merely numbers...

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Besides, who's counting?

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Surely not I...

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burmashavelarge.gif

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I find it impossible to take anything JS posts seriously after all that track 5 controversy.

The post above me is another perfect example of his tomfoolery.

Edited by catesta

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And I already thought catesta posted some answers...

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... he's merely increasing his post count...

couw, by the way, let me thank you again for your great disc! One thing that really surprised me was that there was a Dewey Redman track there (which I actually should have known), yet in the context in which you did put it, I think it was very difficult to recognize. Had it been in the midst of some more "out" music, who knows...

And thanks also for sharing JSngry's music with us! I really do enjoy that track - Tomasz Stanko, my foot! Texans! Anyway, I got to order from him, some day, to be sure!

ubu

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One thing that really surprised me was that there was a Dewey Redman track there (which I actually should have known), yet in the context in which you did put it, I think it was very difficult to recognize. Had it been in the midst of some more "out" music, who knows...

Ubu, I suggest a joint venture to get Jim's discs ....

That Redman - I listened again after knowing it, and it does not quite sound like his usual stuff. That typical cry he has is not displayed here. I have a lot of his stuff with Jarrett and should have got him, but this is somewhat more "classical" jazz than his other stuff. Beautiful track.

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One thing that really surprised me was that there was a Dewey Redman track there (which I actually should have known), yet in the context in which you did put it, I think it was very difficult to recognize. Had it been in the midst of some more "out" music, who knows...

Ubu, I suggest a joint venture to get Jim's discs ....

That Redman - I listened again after knowing it, and it does not quite sound like his usual stuff. That typical cry he has is not displayed here. I have a lot of his stuff with Jarrett and should have got him, but this is somewhat more "classical" jazz than his other stuff. Beautiful track.

Good idea Mike, with Jim's CDs - maybe next month? Please remind me about it, I tend to forget such things (no offense, Jim ;) just bad memory)

I still have to revisit the Redman track, but what you say makes perfect sense. By the way I got the Mysteries Jarrett box from a board member last week. Have had the 1973-74 box for several years, and this band is one of the best things Jarrett ever led! Also the Columbia double disc is a winner.

ubu

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Jarrett has never drawn my attention. Maybe I should remedy that. That group with Haden, Motian & Redman looks like a winner. I'll keep my eyes open.

Anyone have any comments on the album Redman did with Cecil Taylor and Elvin Jones? AMG is rather restrained in its praise.

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I'd like to thank John for including a piece by Quartet Out in his BFT, and I'm heartened by all the positive response to it. There is a bit of a story behind the album, and that cut in particular, but I don't have time to go into it right now. Besides, we need some more comments now that the answers have been revealed!

...

I'll talk about that (and other things pertaining to the cut) in greater detail after others have weighed in.

(and yes - I am TOTALLY embarrased that I'm the one person who should have gotten #11 and didn't!)

Jim, may I take you up on your promise before BFT6 hits us in the face?

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I sincerely can recommend the Jarrett band with Redman, Haden, Motian and Franco or Johnson on percussion. I'd say go the first Impulse box which includes the live tracks in more complete fashion and gives a better picture of what the band did live. I like this quartet much better than the European one with Garbarek, they did some wild stuff.

d16246uuhv7.jpg

AMG link

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My favourite Redman solo, BTW, still is in the title track on Jarrett's

Birth.

e48989gy719.jpg

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thanks for the recommendations. My :eye: :eye: are open.

That impulse set has such an ugly cover I will not pass it by unnoticed. :rsly:

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I sincerely can recommend the Jarrett band with Redman, Haden, Motian and Franco or Johnson on percussion. I'd say go the first Impulse box which includes the live tracks in more complete fashion and gives a better picture of what the band did live. I like this quartet much better than the European one with Garbarek, they did some wild stuff.

d16246uuhv7.jpg

AMG link

:tup

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To fill the gap until Jim posts his inside stories about Quartet Out, I fulfill my promise and post some more exposé ...

That Mangelsdorff track made me think about my relationship to that music, and it was a nice coincidence that I caught a 45 minute feature on him in one of Germany's documentation TV channels last week, done at the occasion of his 75th birthday last year.

It struck me that after an initial heavy Tristano school influence they wanted the music to become somewhat less cerebral, but to me it still sounded pretty abstract and I missed the "black" groove. In the 1970's his music leaned more and more towards so-called "free jazz" and he became one of the leading players in Globe Unity circles and at the same time started developping his amazing multiphonics technique.

It was two factors that made me stay away from this music:

1. it was readily accessible, I lived only 15 miles from Frankfurt where he lived and performed the most often, and I had listened to it often enough to find out that this was not what I wanted to pursue

2. as I was exploring ethnic music at the same time, there was not enough relation to this in it - where I was checking out the African-American roots of the music, his was trying to gain some independence from it and find its European identity.

This is a complex process on the verge of contradiction, as he once stated playing jazz was one possibility of playing music that was the farthest removed from some aspects of German culture he was disgusted with, like people singing more or less drunk in October-Feast-like events ....

Where I still here a continuous soundstream in Mangelsdorff's own identity, it is the sax players who changed radically:

Heinz Sauer developped a raspy inattractive sound without a trace of beauty or humour that I find hard to stand for more than one solo;

Günter Kronberg became one of the greatest mainstream alto players in all of Europe, but there is not a single recording giving a true impression of the energy and comittment to music he exposed on gigs - I saw him with the band Voices (Sauer was in that, too) a few months before his death and he blew everyone off the stage! Great baritone player as well! The stuff they recorded for local radio - which was a lot - was too controlled.

The drummer, Ralf Hübner, always disappointed me, almost no independence of limbs, bad taste in crash cymbals, there were groovier drummers in Germany, but he was the local matador.

His influence was so overpowering, especially because he was the German scene's role model for international recognition, that I had to stay away from that music.

I appreciate the achievements and influence, but it is not my cup of tea ... didn't move me that much, I have to admit.

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Check this one out, too, if you see it cheap (maybe 2001 has it for 10 euros? Or is that deal over?)

http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&u...l=Afs2gtq8zbu47

B00004HYLE.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

ubu

Be warned it has a few tracks with a string quartet. I find it a little unsettled and not quite on the level of the first Impulse box.

But they still have it:

Jarrett, Keith "EXPECTATIONS"

Mit Charlie Haden, Paul Motion, Sam Brown, Airto Moreira, Dewey Redman. Aufnahme 1972. Digitally remastered/20 Bit. Columbia Legacy. 2 CDs 9,99 EUR. Nr. 71488.

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Mike, thanks for your interesting comments on Mangelsdorff et.al.

"Expectations" is well worth 10 euro-zlotys, no?

I think it is a very strong album, all together, and I wouldn't want to miss the tracks with strings, actually. I like it as it is.

ubu

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