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Late

Flying Dutchman Japanese Reissues

14 posts in this topic

Thanks for the heads-up, Late.

I'll be ordering Groove Holmes' Onsaya Joy.

 

 

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3 Shades Of Blue, at last.

plus:

and...i'd not pay for it, but if you know somebody who would, the Tom Scott item is better than even the most optimistic realist could be expected to hope. Just a quartet with Roger Kellaway, Chuck Domanico, and John Guerin, no "crossover" except in the source material, and yeah, it's still Tom Scott, and that's why I'd not pay for it, but still and all, it's a curiosity that won't kill the cat. Just sayin'.

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Love that Leon Thomas in Berlin album!  And glad to get a remaster of Coryell's "Barefoot Boy".

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9 hours ago, JSngry said:

 

 

Good one ....

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6 hours ago, jlhoots said:

Frying Dutchman indeed.

Yaaar!

c03457a837b0c16afce1c1f7d83ee847--univer

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And don't forget Mr. Blyleven! 

1975-BLYLEVEN-NICKNAME.jpg

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2 hours ago, Late said:

And don't forget Mr. Blyleven! 

1975-BLYLEVEN-NICKNAME.jpg

One of the most underrated pitchers ever.  Had he consistently been on good teams,  he would have had staggering records

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3 hours ago, erwbol said:

Any hidden gems there besides Flight for Four which International Phonograph already reissued definitively?

Gato Barbieri's "Under Fire", Leon Thomas's "In Berlin", and Larry Coryell's "Barefoot Boy" (one of the three best albums he ever made to my ears) are all gems, hidden or otherwise.  The Chico Hamilton is a chance to hear some Arnie Lawrence.  The Bob Thiele is originally a 2LP set, an incredibly pretentious "history of jazz" thing, but has appearances by some really interesting people then associated with the label.  Here is the Dusty Groove blurb:

A wild little record – one that was issued under the name of Flying Dutchman label headman Bob Thiele – but which actually features work from some of the grooviest artists on the label at the time – including Tom Scott, Ornette Coleman, Jon Appleton, John Carter, Horace Tapscott, and Bobby Bradford! The package has a very different feel on each of the album's four sides – and side one is a tremendous showcase for the young reedman Tom Scott – working here in a cool mix of electric and acoustic instrumentation that's similar to his other records of the time – including organ, vibes, and some nice funky touches as well. Side two features an exploration of the history of jazz – but one that progresses quickly from early modes to hipper ones – showcasing the talents of John Carter on tenor, Bobby Bradford on trumpet, and Horace Tapscott on piano! Side three is a mighty dedication to the late John Coltrane – played at first by a trio with Joe Farrell on flute, Wilbur Ware on bass, and Elvin Jones on drums – then moving into a mix of Farrell's flute and narration by Rosko – then a performance by the Ornette Coleman quartet. And side four is especially mindblowing, as it's comprised of lone long piece by Jon Appleton's Syntonic Menagerie – a mix of sound samples, tape tricks, and jazz – as a commentary on The American Indian, JFK, and Martin Luther King. The whole thing's a great illustration of the Flying Dutchman label at its most revolutionary – and titles include "Head Start", "Freaky Zeke", "Lanoola Goes Limp", "Swing Era", "In The Vineyard/Avant Garde", "Love Supreme", "Lament For John Coltrane", and "A Few Thoughts For The Day". CD also features a rare bonus track – "The Flying Dutchman".

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This right here is all the gem that gemmed could gem.

 

2 hours ago, felser said:

 

A wild little record – one that was issued under the name of Flying Dutchman label headman Bob Thiele – but which actually features work from some of the grooviest artists on the label at the time – including Tom Scott, Ornette Coleman, Jon Appleton, John Carter, Horace Tapscott, and Bobby Bradford! The package has a very different feel on each of the album's four sides – and side one is a tremendous showcase for the young reedman Tom Scott – working here in a cool mix of electric and acoustic instrumentation that's similar to his other records of the time – including organ, vibes, and some nice funky touches as well. Side two features an exploration of the history of jazz – but one that progresses quickly from early modes to hipper ones – showcasing the talents of John Carter on tenor, Bobby Bradford on trumpet, and Horace Tapscott on piano! Side three is a mighty dedication to the late John Coltrane – played at first by a trio with Joe Farrell on flute, Wilbur Ware on bass, and Elvin Jones on drums – then moving into a mix of Farrell's flute and narration by Rosko – then a performance by the Ornette Coleman quartet. And side four is especially mindblowing, as it's comprised of lone long piece by Jon Appleton's Syntonic Menagerie – a mix of sound samples, tape tricks, and jazz – as a commentary on The American Indian, JFK, and Martin Luther King. The whole thing's a great illustration of the Flying Dutchman label at its most revolutionary – and titles include "Head Start", "Freaky Zeke", "Lanoola Goes Limp", "Swing Era", "In The Vineyard/Avant Garde", "Love Supreme", "Lament For John Coltrane", and "A Few Thoughts For The Day". CD also features a rare bonus track – "The Flying Dutchman".

My memory might be failing, but isn't the Ornette thing from Coltrane's funeral?

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CDSOL-45729.jpg?v=1

I've had this one for 50 years or so, and still listen to it every once in a while as an enjoyable oddity.

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2 hours ago, JSngry said:

This right here is all the gem that gemmed could gem.

 

My memory might be failing, but isn't the Ornette thing from Coltrane's funeral?

Yep - this is from online article by Kevin Laskey at musicandliterature.com:

The service featured readings, including Coltrane’s friend, the trumpeter Calvin Massey, reciting the former’s poem “A Love Supreme”, and musical performances by Coltrane’s saxophonist-peers Albert Ayler and Ornette Coleman. Ayler’s quartet, featuring Donald Ayler on trumpet, Richard Davis on bass, and Milford Graves on drums, opened the ceremony, while Coleman’s quartet, featuring David Izenson and Charlie Haden on bass, and Charles Moffett on drums, played just before the benediction. Both of these incendiary performances were captured on portable recording equipment—albeit with fairly low fidelity—and were eventually released on record. (Ayler’s performance can be found on the compilation Holy Ghost: Rare & Unissued Recordings (1962-1970), released by Revenant Records in 2004, while Coleman’s performance was originally released under the title“Holiday for a Graveyard”, on the album Head Start by the Bob Thiele Emergency on Flying Dutchman Records in 1969.)

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