Hot Ptah

BFT168 Diacussion Thread

49 posts in this topic

 The theme of this Blindfold Test 168 is enjoyment. I tried to make this collection of songs enjoyable to listen to

Here is Thom Keith's link, which is the same link as in his post below. I copied and pasted it here:

http://thomkeith.net/index.php/blindfold-tests/

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Updated.  General FYI, I've put it into my iCal to update the page the last day of every month, so it WILL happen, now.  :D

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44 minutes ago, tkeith said:

Updated.  General FYI, I've put it into my iCal to update the page the last day of every month, so it WILL happen, now.  :D

Thom, the music stops on track 2. 

1. Sounds to be a modern big band, but the pianist seems to be old school. Is it Earl Hines on piano?

Edited by Hardbopjazz

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I'm getting "page not found" error from the link.

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On ‎2‎/‎27‎/‎2018 at 2:24 PM, Hardbopjazz said:

Thom, the music stops on track 2. 

1. Sounds to be a modern big band, but the pianist seems to be old school. Is it Earl Hines on piano?

The pianist does go way back, but is not Earl Hines.

Edited by Hot Ptah

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1. Sounds to be a modern big band, but the pianist seems to be old school. Is it Earl Hines on piano?

2. No idea who is on alto or organ.

3. At first I thought this was going to be George Harrison on sitar. Within you, Without you. :) A wild guess, could it be Ted Nash on alto? 

4. I like the guitar playing. No clue who this is at the moment. 

5. Is this a Ron Carter trio session? I know I have this. I can't recall who this is. The mind isn't as sharp as you get older.

6. I like whomever this is on piano. I can't say I know who it is.

7. Ben Webster on tenor. More on this one later.

8. Is it Yusef Lateef on flute? 

More later.  

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Thom Keith, I am getting a Page Not Found error message from the link, using both Firefox and Outlook as the browsers. I cannot access the Blindfold Test. I am not sure why Hardbopjazz is able to access it.

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4 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

Thom Keith, I am getting a Page Not Found error message from the link, using both Firefox and Outlook as the browsers. I cannot access the Blindfold Test. I am not sure why Hardbopjazz is able to access it.

I'm special. That's why. :) 

http://thomkeith.net/index.php/blindfold-tests/

Edited by Hardbopjazz

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9. No idea on this one. 

10. Some Latin jazz. Could the pianist be Eddie Palmieri? 

11. This is a Texas tenor player for sure. 

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Okay, not sure what's going on with the link, but it's working for me in all browsers (Safari, included), even on different machines. 

Try this link:  http://thomkeith.net/index.php/blindfold-tests/

Granted, I got an advanced listen, but here are my responses on that first listen:

Track 1 - First thought was that it was electronic keyboard, but given the style, I'm now uncertain. Ah! There's John Gilmore, so I have to assume it's Sun Ra's band, but maybe after he passed?

 
Track 2 - Off the bat, sounds like Cyrille's drumming. Organ sounds like Sun Ra. I know there is the Ra small band record on Horo (which I haven't heard in quite awhile), but this sounds cleaner than that, in terms of the recording. Definitely Ra, definitely Gilmore. I may be wrong about Cyrille, but I'm sure getting that vibe.
 
Track 3 - I'm thinking of that John Handy record on MPS with similar instrumentation. Not convinced it's John, though. This stuff is always hit or miss with me, but this is a full-on hit. Man, that control. It's almost gotta be John.
 
Track 4 - No clue. Very pleasant, though.
 
Track 5 - Dat Dere. Initially, I was thinking it might Randy Weston, but once it gets going, I don't get that vibe at all.
 
Track 6 - Recognize the song as Ellingtonia, but not that I can put a title to. I will guess Sir Roland Hanna.
 
Track 7 - My first thought was Ricky Ford, my second was Harold Ashby. Neither are correct. Nope. I'm going with Ricky Ford.
 
Track 8 - This has a distinctly Ibrahim vibe, but I don't recognize it. It's beautiful, though, particularly the left-hand of the piano. And then what seems to be Ricky Ford again would certainly support this being one of the Ekaya projects. It's not HoJo... sounds more like Charles Davis. I have Mindif and African River, but not The Mountain. I'll assume this is from the latter.
 
Track 9 - This is cool in that Gil Evans 70s way. Even though those are synth strings, it works in this setting (odd since I had such an adverse reaction to them on last months BFT). I mean, I'd still prefer the real deal, but this works. Sure sounds like Hannibal. Is this Gil? Man, this is killin'! I need to acquire this. Don't suppose it's something off the wall like Mike Westbrook? Track 10 - No idea. Obvious guess would be Tito, but I have nothing to back it up. I know Jerry Gonzalez band can get this feel, but this seems like a bigger unit.
 
Track 11 - Back to straight ahead, and it fits perfectly. Seems like something almost on the commercial end of the spectrum. My wife had a disc with Red Prysock playing a lot like this. A lot of stuff I'm hearing could be a lot of guys, but when he goes to Cuckooville (which I love), it leads me to believe it might be Red. Track 12 - Big sound. So big, I was thinking it was a tenor, at first. I've Louis Jordan (later) play like this, but don't think it's him. There's a lot to like in this. It's the understanding and respect paid to this stuff that makes me appreciate James Carter (when he stays focused).
 
Track 13 - Man, this test took a turn, but I'm cool with it. A little more rock-and-roll than my listening takes me, but I"m totally diggin' it. No guesses. Guitar sounds like a cross between Albert Collins and Buddy Guy.
 
Track 14 - That's another direction. I want to like it, but the distorted guitar is working against the process. It's unique, I'll give it that. Initially, it reminded me a lot of Peter Apfelbaum's Luminous Charms, but it seems a little more "in" than that. Lost me with the synth solo.
 
Track 15 - Intro was more interesting to me than when it got going. I still like it, but it went in a different direction. First instincts had me thinking DeJohnette's Special Edition, and I'm coninced it's Jack. That's not any of the tenors I expect, so maybe the band with Gary Thomas?

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1. Someone took a piece by Debussy and a piece by Sondheim, shook the notes together, and handed them to a stride pianist. The unfortunate introduction out of the way, things settle into a frenetic version of "Blue Lou". This is a piece meant for dancing, and they're butchering it. Some modern (i.e., post-WWII) band that doesn't understand Swing with a capital S. Is that a bass sax? That's kinda cool.

The pianist, once s/he settles in during the second half of the intro, is the most enjoyable part. Then they never re-appear. Hmpf!

I sort of hate it, and (or because) I love most 30's and 40's recordings of this piece. Listen to Fletcher Henderson in 1936 (when Big Sid, Roy Eldridge, and Chu Berry were all in the band) or to Chick Webb's posthumous Ella-led band in 1939 to hear what it sounds like in its original context.

3. Half a second in, and I expect a George Harrison vocal.

5. Some serious piano playing. No idea who/what/anything. Would shoot the drummer. Then again, I would shoot most drummers, so, you know. Would love to hear more of the piano player.

7. That's a very pretty tenor. Dunno who or what, though, and don't feel like just throwing out names. Keen to find out!

11. Another modern big band attempts swing. If I ever meet the drummer, I am going to take that cymbal and shove it up one of his (or her?) orifices. This sounds like it's either 1950's jump blues about to cross over into R&B, or it's some swing revival 1990's or early 2000's stuff.

The awful drummer had me leaning towards the latter, but the screaming sax is way better than anything that was around in the neoswing scene, so I'm gonna go with a fifties recording. No idea who it is. Wouldn't mind hearing more from the saxophonist with a different rhythm section.

12. More fifties sax? Is that Earl Bostic? I think it is. (OK, I had to look through my library to find the name of the tune: "Steam Whistle Jump" from 1952.) I like this. Nothing too complex going on, but it pleasantly bops along.

13. Now we're really into Rock 'n' Roll. Late 50's? (Turns out it's early 60's, but I only found out after identifying it and looking up the year.) It's Ike Turner, several years (turns out about a decade!) after "Rocket 88". Is that Jackie Brenston on sax? Probably. Again, I had to look up the name: "Prancing".

Fun.

 

I don't have anything reasonable or interesting to say about the rest (one might argue I didn't about this lot, either, but here it is anyway). It's the first BFT in a while that's gotten me excited enough to comment, so you did something right. :) Thanks for compiling!

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I've tried to access BFT 168 but there's no apparent download link. I tried clicking on something in a thing called Hensman that said BFT168, but nothing happened.

What do I have to do to get it?

MG

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28 minutes ago, The Magnificent Goldberg said:

I've tried to access BFT 168 but there's no apparent download link. I tried clicking on something in a thing called Hensman that said BFT168, but nothing happened.

What do I have to do to get it?

MG

Glad to see you back, MG.

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36 minutes ago, The Magnificent Goldberg said:

I've tried to access BFT 168 but there's no apparent download link. I tried clicking on something in a thing called Hensman that said BFT168, but nothing happened.

What do I have to do to get it?

MG

Did you try the link in Thom Keith's post, a few posts above yours? That one seems to work.

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6 Sure sounds like latter-day solo Ellington to me and 7 like Ben Webster.  

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On ‎2‎/‎28‎/‎2018 at 2:43 PM, Hardbopjazz said:

1. Sounds to be a modern big band, but the pianist seems to be old school. Is it Earl Hines on piano?

As I said, the pianist goes back into jazz history, but it is not Earl Hines.

2. No idea who is on alto or organ.

You may be surprised.

3. At first I thought this was going to be George Harrison on sitar. Within you, Without you. :) A wild guess, could it be Ted Nash on alto? 

It is not Ted Nash, no. The saxophonist began his career much earlier than Ted Nash did.

4. I like the guitar playing. No clue who this is at the moment. 

I think that everyone will be surprised at who the guitarist is.

5. Is this a Ron Carter trio session? I know I have this. I can't recall who this is. The mind isn't as sharp as you get older.

It is not Ron Carter on bass. The bassist is someone you should be familiar with though.

6. I like whomever this is on piano. I can't say I know who it is.

Wait until you find out!

7. Ben Webster on tenor. More on this one later.

It is not Ben Webster. I imagine that the saxophonist would take that identification as quite a compliment.

8. Is it Yusef Lateef on flute? 

No, it is not Yusef.

More later.  

 

20 hours ago, Hardbopjazz said:

9. No idea on this one. 

10. Some Latin jazz. Could the pianist be Eddie Palmieri? 

It is not Eddie Palmieri.

11. This is a Texas tenor player for sure. 

I am not sure if he was from Texas. He has a big soulful sound, to be sure.

 

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20 hours ago, tkeith said:

Okay, not sure what's going on with the link, but it's working for me in all browsers (Safari, included), even on different machines. 

Try this link:  http://thomkeith.net/index.php/blindfold-tests/

Granted, I got an advanced listen, but here are my responses on that first listen:

Track 1 - First thought was that it was electronic keyboard, but given the style, I'm now uncertain. Ah! There's John Gilmore, so I have to assume it's Sun Ra's band, but maybe after he passed?

Part of that is correct.

 
Track 2 - Off the bat, sounds like Cyrille's drumming. Organ sounds like Sun Ra. I know there is the Ra small band record on Horo (which I haven't heard in quite awhile), but this sounds cleaner than that, in terms of the recording. Definitely Ra, definitely Gilmore. I may be wrong about Cyrille, but I'm sure getting that vibe.
 
You are correct about Sun Ra and John Gilmore. It is not Andrew Cyrille. Now what album is this from?
 
Track 3 - I'm thinking of that John Handy record on MPS with similar instrumentation. Not convinced it's John, though. This stuff is always hit or miss with me, but this is a full-on hit. Man, that control. It's almost gotta be John.
 
It is John Handy.
 
Track 4 - No clue. Very pleasant, though.
 
Just wait until you find out who this is!
 
Track 5 - Dat Dere. Initially, I was thinking it might Randy Weston, but once it gets going, I don't get that vibe at all.
 
It is Dat Dere.
 
Track 6 - Recognize the song as Ellingtonia, but not that I can put a title to. I will guess Sir Roland Hanna.
 
It is an Ellington song, but it is not Roland Hanna.
 
Track 7 - My first thought was Ricky Ford, my second was Harold Ashby. Neither are correct. Nope. I'm going with Ricky Ford.
 
DIng Ding Ding.. Damn, you are good. It is Ricky Ford.
 
Track 8 - This has a distinctly Ibrahim vibe, but I don't recognize it. It's beautiful, though, particularly the left-hand of the piano. And then what seems to be Ricky Ford again would certainly support this being one of the Ekaya projects. It's not HoJo... sounds more like Charles Davis. I have Mindif and African River, but not The Mountain. I'll assume this is from the latter.
 
I am impressed. It is an Abdullah Ibrahim Ekaya project, although it is not on any of the albums which you mentioned. You correctly identified Ibrahim, Ricky Ford and Charles Davis.
 
Track 9 - This is cool in that Gil Evans 70s way. Even though those are synth strings, it works in this setting (odd since I had such an adverse reaction to them on last months BFT). I mean, I'd still prefer the real deal, but this works. Sure sounds like Hannibal. Is this Gil? Man, this is killin'! I need to acquire this. Don't suppose it's something off the wall like Mike Westbrook?
 
I am glad that you like this so much. Your guesses are very interesting. I can hear what you are hearing. You have not identified it yet.
 
Track 10 - No idea. Obvious guess would be Tito, but I have nothing to back it up. I know Jerry Gonzalez band can get this feel, but this seems like a bigger unit.
 
You have not identified it yet.
 
Track 11 - Back to straight ahead, and it fits perfectly. Seems like something almost on the commercial end of the spectrum. My wife had a disc with Red Prysock playing a lot like this. A lot of stuff I'm hearing could be a lot of guys, but when he goes to Cuckooville (which I love), it leads me to believe it might be Red.
 
It is not Red, but in his general era.
 
Track 12 - Big sound. So big, I was thinking it was a tenor, at first. I've Louis Jordan (later) play like this, but don't think it's him. There's a lot to like in this. It's the understanding and respect paid to this stuff that makes me appreciate James Carter (when he stays focused).
 
It is not Louis Jordan. I agree that it is a really big sound! The immediacy of this--it just leaps out of your speakers.
 
Track 13 - Man, this test took a turn, but I'm cool with it. A little more rock-and-roll than my listening takes me, but I"m totally diggin' it. No guesses. Guitar sounds like a cross between Albert Collins and Buddy Guy.
 
I like this a lot too. You may be surprised at who it is.
 
Track 14 - That's another direction. I want to like it, but the distorted guitar is working against the process. It's unique, I'll give it that. Initially, it reminded me a lot of Peter Apfelbaum's Luminous Charms, but it seems a little more "in" than that. Lost me with the synth solo.
 
I put this near the end because I know that it is really different.
 
Track 15 - Intro was more interesting to me than when it got going. I still like it, but it went in a different direction. First instincts had me thinking DeJohnette's Special Edition, and I'm coninced it's Jack. That's not any of the tenors I expect, so maybe the band with Gary Thomas?
 
It is Jack and Special Edition. Not Gary Thomas. It is from a really good album, in my humble opinion.

 

18 hours ago, lipi said:

1. Someone took a piece by Debussy and a piece by Sondheim, shook the notes together, and handed them to a stride pianist. The unfortunate introduction out of the way, things settle into a frenetic version of "Blue Lou". This is a piece meant for dancing, and they're butchering it. Some modern (i.e., post-WWII) band that doesn't understand Swing with a capital S. Is that a bass sax? That's kinda cool.

The pianist, once s/he settles in during the second half of the intro, is the most enjoyable part. Then they never re-appear. Hmpf!

I sort of hate it, and (or because) I love most 30's and 40's recordings of this piece. Listen to Fletcher Henderson in 1936 (when Big Sid, Roy Eldridge, and Chu Berry were all in the band) or to Chick Webb's posthumous Ella-led band in 1939 to hear what it sounds like in its original context.

I understand your points, although I like this recording.

3. Half a second in, and I expect a George Harrison vocal.

5. Some serious piano playing. No idea who/what/anything. Would shoot the drummer. Then again, I would shoot most drummers, so, you know. Would love to hear more of the piano player.

It is a great piano player here.

7. That's a very pretty tenor. Dunno who or what, though, and don't feel like just throwing out names. Keen to find out!11. Another modern big band attempts swing. If I ever meet the drummer, I am going to take that cymbal and shove it up one of his (or her?) orifices. This sounds like it's either

1950's jump blues about to cross over into R&B, or it's some swing revival 1990's or early 2000's stuff.

The awful drummer had me leaning towards the latter, but the screaming sax is way better than anything that was around in the neoswing scene, so I'm gonna go with a fifties recording. No idea who it is. Wouldn't mind hearing more from the saxophonist with a different rhythm section.

1950s jump blues about to cross over into R&B is about what this is.

12. More fifties sax? Is that Earl Bostic? I think it is. (OK, I had to look through my library to find the name of the tune: "Steam Whistle Jump" from 1952.) I like this. Nothing too complex going on, but it pleasantly bops along.

Yes, you have identified the saxophonist and song title. I am amazed that someone had the nerve to copy Strayhorn's Take the A Train and call it Steam Whistle Jump.

13. Now we're really into Rock 'n' Roll. Late 50's? (Turns out it's early 60's, but I only found out after identifying it and looking up the year.) It's Ike Turner, several years (turns out about a decade!) after "Rocket 88". Is that Jackie Brenston on sax? Probably. Again, I had to look up the name: "Prancing".

Fun.

Yes, you have the artist and song correct. I am impressed.

I don't have anything reasonable or interesting to say about the rest (one might argue I didn't about this lot, either, but here it is anyway). It's the first BFT in a while that's gotten me excited enough to comment, so you did something right. :) Thanks for compiling!   Thanks for the positive comments. I am glad that you liked some of it.

 

4 hours ago, medjuck said:

6 Sure sounds like latter-day solo Ellington to me and 7 like Ben Webster.  

6 is latter day solo Ellington. Now what is the song title and the album?

7 is not Ben Webster. As I have previously commented, I think that the saxophonist would take that as quite a compliment.

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Posted (edited)

4 hours ago, Hot Ptah said:

 

 

6 is latter day solo Ellington. Now what is the song title and the album?

7 is not Ben Webster. As I have previously commented, I think that the saxophonist would take that as quite a compliment.

OK 6 is from a cd called "Duke Ellington, An Intimate Piano Session". It's one of the versions of Le Sucrier Velours done on August 25, 1972. (There are two takes and I haven't compared them to this yet.)  I know about the session because a friend of mine told me he was present at an Ellington recording at which  his brother was the engineer.  He described it in detail and it didn't sound like anything I knew of. I contacted the brother, Jeff Lesser, who said it was never released but he remembered  the studio and the approximate dates.    After some research I was able to get the exact recording info and discovered that it was on a   Duke Ellington Music Society tape that the late great Sjef Hoefsmit had sent out.  With some difficulty  I got a copy and made a digital version for Jeff and his brother.  Shortly afterwards, of course,  the cd appeared but it gives no credit to Jeff and in fact makes it sound like the engineer was the guy who I suspect engineered the "bonus tracks" which are from Rotterdam 1969.

I'm going on about this just to give some credit to Jeff Lesser.  BTW Sjef's tape has even more "dialogue" than is found on the cd. 

 

And Track 1 sounds like a live session by the Lincoln Center Jazz band, or someone of that  ilk, with a guest pianist.  (That's not meant to be a put down-- I've at times enjoyed them. )

Edited by medjuck

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Posted (edited)

On ‎3‎/‎2‎/‎2018 at 6:47 PM, medjuck said:

OK 6 is from a cd called "Duke Ellington, An Intimate Piano Session". It's one of the versions of Le Sucrier Velours done on August 25, 1972. (There are two takes and I haven't compared them to this yet.)  I know about the session because a friend of mine told me he was present at an Ellington recording at which  his brother was the engineer.  He described it in detail and it didn't sound like anything I knew of. I contacted the brother, Jeff Lesser, who said it was never released but knew the studio and the approximate dates.    After some research I was able to get the exact recording info and discovered that it was on a   Duke Ellington Music society tape that the late great Sjef Hoefsmit had sent out.  With some difficulty  I got a copy and made a digital version for Jeff and his brother.  Shortly afterwards, of course,  the cd appeared but it gives no credit to Jeff and in fact makes it sound like the engineer was the guy who I suspect engineered the "bonus tracks" which are from Rotterdam 1969.

I'm going on about this just to give some credit to Jeff Lesser.  BTW Sjef's tape has even more "dialogue" than is found on the cd. 

 

And Track 1 sounds like a live session by the Lincoln Center Jazz band, or someone of that  ilk, with a guest pianist.  (That's not meant to be a put down-- I've at times enjoyed them. )

You are correct about 6. That is very interesting information about that album, which I enjoy a lot. Thank you for sharing that information.

Track 1 is by a band which would probably not have fit easily with Lincoln Center.

 

Edited by Hot Ptah

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OK, here goes.

1 -- Sun Ra goes into Fletcher Henderson mode. 

2 -- Sun Ra and Gilmore again, or have you tricked me into thinking that somebody else is Gilmore?

3 -- I'm 260 miles from my record collection right now, but I'd start looking for this one among the Rabih Abou-Khalil records. I love, love, love the sound of that alto. 

4 -- No guess, but I like the refusal to turn this into a showpiece. It's music on a guitar, not mere guitar music. 

5 -- Dat Dere. No guess on the pianist, who is presumably the leader. 

6. -- I see that it's been identified. I'm too embarrassed to say what my guess was.

7 -- At first you have to say Ben, but after a while details such as the bass part suggest we're listening to something newer. When the tenor comes back, I'm hearing Ricky Ford. I know there's a Richard Davis quartet album with Ricky Ford, and I'll bet this one can be found there. 

8 -- Ricky Ford for sure, with Carlos Ward on flute and Charles Davis on bari, in Abdullah Ibrahim's Ekaya.  

Are we perhaps playing a game of pairs here? Two of Sunny and Gilmore, two Ricky, two of others I haven't figured out?

9 -- OK, this is fun. Is that a mellotron wailing along in the back? Might be something that was mashed together electronically. But no less enjoyable for that. 

10 -- Maybe Eddie Palmieri with Brian Lynch and Conrad Herwig. Or Brian and Conrad with somebody else. Or none of the above. Yes, definitely one of those things. A good one.

11 -- Illinois, or Arnett, orJug. Tenor with maybe three other horns in the back. The first half-chorus of the tenor solo could be textbook Dexter, but it's not him. Eagerly awaiting an answer to this one. 

12 -- I'll guess Earl Bostic. The technical security is amazing. 

13 -- I want more of this guitarist, whoever it is. 

14 -- I'll tell y'all later. I want to hear what you have to say about it first. 

15 -- Tenor sounds like Bennie Wallace at times, bari like Bluiett, and I'll probably be embarrassed by the reveal. 

This BFT tickles me. Thanks, Bill.

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4 hours ago, Spontooneous said:

OK, here goes.

1 -- Sun Ra goes into Fletcher Henderson mode. 

Yes. Now which album?

2 -- Sun Ra and Gilmore again, or have you tricked me into thinking that somebody else is Gilmore?

It is Sun Ra and John Gilmore. But which album?

3 -- I'm 260 miles from my record collection right now, but I'd start looking for this one among the Rabih Abou-Khalil records. I love, love, love the sound of that alto. 

It is not in the Rabih Abou-Khalil area of your collection. This was recorded much earlier.

4 -- No guess, but I like the refusal to turn this into a showpiece. It's music on a guitar, not mere guitar music. 

Very true.

5 -- Dat Dere. No guess on the pianist, who is presumably the leader. 

It is Dat Dere, and the pianist is the leader.

 

4 hours ago, Spontooneous said:

6. -- I see that it's been identified. I'm too embarrassed to say what my guess was.

I would love to hear your guess!

7 -- At first you have to say Ben, but after a while details such as the bass part suggest we're listening to something newer. When the tenor comes back, I'm hearing Ricky Ford. I know there's a Richard Davis quartet album with Ricky Ford, and I'll bet this one can be found there. 

It is Ricky Ford!

8 -- Ricky Ford for sure, with Carlos Ward on flute and Charles Davis on bari, in Abdullah Ibrahim's Ekaya.  

Yes.

Are we perhaps playing a game of pairs here? Two of Sunny and Gilmore, two Ricky, two of others I haven't figured out?

9 -- OK, this is fun. Is that a mellotron wailing along in the back? Might be something that was mashed together electronically. But no less enjoyable for that. 

I think that some members will be surprised at who this is.

10 -- Maybe Eddie Palmieri with Brian Lynch and Conrad Herwig. Or Brian and Conrad with somebody else. Or none of the above. Yes, definitely one of those things. A good one.

It is none of those musicians. I agree that it is a good one.

11 -- Illinois, or Arnett, orJug. Tenor with maybe three other horns in the back. The first half-chorus of the tenor solo could be textbook Dexter, but it's not him. Eagerly awaiting an answer to this one. 

None of those. It is from that era. This is the kind of thing that The Magnificent Goldberg can identify in about three seconds.

12 -- I'll guess Earl Bostic. The technical security is amazing. 

Earl Bostic it is!

13 -- I want more of this guitarist, whoever it is. 

You may be surprised! I was surprised that he played like this.

14 -- I'll tell y'all later. I want to hear what you have to say about it first. 

15 -- Tenor sounds like Bennie Wallace at times, bari like Bluiett, and I'll probably be embarrassed by the reveal. 

It is neither of those, but Bluiett is a good guess. It is from his era of prominence.

This BFT tickles me. Thanks, Bill.

I am glad that it does.

 

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BFT168

Well, here we are; Missus getting Grandson #2 to karate but reporting an accident having blocked the road on the return, so she doesn’t know how late she’s gonna be. What an opportunity!

1 Ah, an audience; unrecognisable, I’m afraid. As for the band, sounds like someone playing Monk at a burlesque (music hall) show. Not something I’d willingly encounter even on a dark night. I know the tune well, but can’t be asked to call the title to mind.

2 An organist. Playing ‘Satin doll’. Happy to wind up the volume. I suspect this is a lady organist; she’s a bit well behaved. The tenor player has an awful sound; he probably sounds better in the bath. Someone playing with a sound like this doesn’t deserve to be listened to with any great attention. Sometimes the organist reminds me of Rhoda Scott, but not in her chorded chorus; I think Rhoda plays MUCH better than this.

3 Indian percussion going on here makes me think this is a fairly modern recording. Oh, in comes a sitar. Well, it’s not that it’s not nice and pleasant. It’s more that I don’t really care.

4 Pleasant-sounding guitarist playing a tune that sounds as if it’s something everyone knows except me. He sounds a bit amateur, with all those halts or slow-motion bits, like he hasn’t had the lesson on swing yet.

5 Something swinging a little bit funkily on ‘Dat dere’. It’s not a version I’ve heard before. Pretty nice, though he sounds like he’s playing a little fast for his ability. Must be someone I’ve heard of but haven’t got into properly. Drummer sounds a bit too much or too loud or something. But this sounds like someone I should look into.

6 I’m looking for the tune and ain’t finding one; just a bunch of bits for two minutes forty-two. Maybe the idea is to produce a tune full of quotes.

Well, my wife was mistaken about traffic holdups on the way home. So I'm full of dinner now with the washing up done, too.

7 Oh, this is nice, shades of ‘I water the front cover’. I SHOULD know this tenor player. But I don’t. Sounds like Richard Wyands being ornate on piano. There’s a lot that’s very familiar about the tenor man; I think I’m going to howl when I find out who it is.

8 Flute player. I’m quite poor on flute players, but I’m sure it’s not David Newman. Or Herbie Mann, for that matter. He’s flowing quite nicely, though. Zounds! I KNOW this! I’m sure I’ve got it somewhere. Well, now I’m NOT sure. But NOW I think this is Abdullah Ibrahim. Something from the ‘Ekaya’ album, but none of the timings fit, so it must be one of the others.

9 Ah, go on, pull the other one.

10 Well, this COULD be a late Gerald Wislon cut. I think he lost his touch sometime in the seventies or eighties, though I haven’t heard a lot of it. But it’s a bit like his recent things that I don’t like nearly as much as his PJ work. Of course, it could be Bobby Bryant. The trumpet soloist sounds a bit like him. It’s all good but doesn’t seem to have a directed intention behind it.

11 Oh THIS I know, and have. It’s Illinois Jacquet.

12 ‘Take the A train’ by someone not too unfamiliar. Actually it’s by someone not too familiar to ME; Duke Ellington, I think. Nah, I know that tenor player better than I know Paul Gonsalves. You know, it could be ANOTHER Jacquet.

13 Don’t know the tune but the guitarist sounds like Freddie King got into a big band by mistake and didn’t leave quickly enough.

14 Noises pretending they’re music.

15 Nice stuff to start with. A bit reminiscent of some Abdullah Ibrahim stuff, but a bit too undirected for him. Well, quite a LOT too undirected for him, I say, as the band starts to give its impression of swinging movie music. Not for me, thanks. Off I go to listen to Lord Kitchener. HE swings!

MG

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11 -- Illinois, or Arnett, orJug. Tenor with maybe three other horns in the back. The first half-chorus of the tenor solo could be textbook Dexter, but it's not him. Eagerly awaiting an answer to this one. 

None of those. It is from that era. This is the kind of thing that The Magnificent Goldberg can identify in about three seconds.

Well, I damn well DIDN'T!

I'll have another listen in a bit.

MG

Oh, it's 'On my own' by Gator Tail.

Sorry to be so slow.

MG

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Posted (edited)

On ‎3‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 3:45 PM, The Magnificent Goldberg said:

11 -- Illinois, or Arnett, orJug. Tenor with maybe three other horns in the back. The first half-chorus of the tenor solo could be textbook Dexter, but it's not him. Eagerly awaiting an answer to this one. 

None of those. It is from that era. This is the kind of thing that The Magnificent Goldberg can identify in about three seconds.

Well, I damn well DIDN'T!

I'll have another listen in a bit.

MG

Oh, it's 'On my own' by Gator Tail.

Sorry to be so slow.

MG

That’s it! Yes!

Edited by Hot Ptah

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