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Larry Kart

Wild Bill Davison

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If you don’t know this album already, you’re in for a treat. Wild Bill, Kenny Davern, pianist  Charlie Queener and Geroge Wettling (no bassist) recorded in 1968 in a club in Columbus, Ohio. All in fine form, but Davison and Wettling are out of sight; it was Wettling's trio (and probably his final recording; he died in '68); Wild Bill sat in and recorded it all himself on his own tape machine — good sound too.

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Don't know that one but have a bunch of admiration for WBD. Glad I had so many times to hear him in person.

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I don't know the piano player, BUT I'm in. Ordered. $2.99.

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It's a good one. But it's one of many many good Wild Bill records. I love that burry tone! I know a trumpeter in Austin, Dave Bedrich, who shares a similar sound. Exciting to hear!

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I am also a big fan of Wild Bill. His playing is almost always full of passion and exuberance.

I have the CD Larry mentioned. It has been a long time since I played it. Just pulled it off the shelf 

and will be playing it within the next couple of days.

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Can't say that I'm a "fan" of Wild Bill, but I avoided him for a loooong time becuase I had him associated with cornball striped-vest rah-rah type "Dixieland" music. but then, somebody here, I forgot who, maybe Lon, maybe Chuck, said, no, you're doing yourself a real disservice by not checking this guy out, he can really play. So I did, and of course, they were right about that. Totally.

I'm tempted to look for the CD in question because between Columbus ,Ohio and a pianist named Charlie Queener, I'm thinking that this is a chance to hear a combined jazz perspective that you'd not find everyday, especially not in real time today.

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Wild Bill made a really good record in Toronto that virtually launched John Norris' Sackville label back in 1968.  "The Jazz Giants" featured Benny Morton on trombone, Herb Hall (Edmond's brother) on clarinet and a rhythm section of Claude Hopkins, Arvell Shaw and Buzzy Drootin.  I don't know if the Delmark version of Sackville carries it, but it did get released as a CD back in 1986, but it's one worth seeking if you like some solid dixie/swing played by distinctive musicians.  (The catalogue # was Sackville SKCD2-3002.)

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Yep. Here it is and it's a good one. This is a thread about Wild Bill, but I'll add that I've always liked Benny Morton ever since I heard him in Toronto way back in about '73 or '74 with the World's Greatest Jazz Band. A very underrated trombonist.   

 

The Jazz Giants

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Ted O'Reilly and John Tapscott are correct. The Jazz Giants CD on Sackville is very good.

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In fact, his playing ended to be the opposite of Wild.  A lyric artist, sensitive, even thoughtful amidst the Condon clutter.

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MI0001491637.jpg

Mosaic left this off a box they did (one of the Columbias ... Condon Mob?) because it was readily available when they put that set together. Well, by the point I got it, the CD was OOP and it took me a few attempts to get it, but it's gorgeous indeed!

I could certainly do with a few more of his albums, though I have him as a soloist/sideman on countless earlier sessions (Condon et al.), so thanks for the recommendations!

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