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George Coleman

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Does anyone subscribe to the Times online you can post the entire article?

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/george-coleman-the-quartet-review-former-miles-davis-sideman-comes-into-his-own-rvm7dv2tl

George Coleman: The Quartet review — former Miles Davis sideman comes into his own

George Coleman will always be known as the guy who quit what became Miles Davis’s second great quintet. The tenor saxophonist’s old-school bebop didn’t fit in with his bandmates’ questing sound and he was replaced by Wayne Shorter. For Shorter the rest was history, but Coleman almost was history. A paucity of leader dates since hasn’t helped his cause, but he deserves better, as this album proves.

The group here certainly offer more sympathetic company. He has been leading them for 20 years and playing with their pianist, Harold Mabern, off and on, for 50. Remarkably, it’s the quartet’s first recording. No sheet music was used, and one tune,East 9th Street Blues, was apparently created on the spot. Coleman’s subdued.@quy...lasts for half…

 

 

 

 

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I thought that Jim doesn't want us to post entire articles as it is a copyright violation and he doesn't want the hassles that could bring?

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That is correct. You can post the link and a few introductory sentences but not the whole thing. 

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I also had tried to read it, but then there came a popup that I should "subscribe" so I didn´t go further.

But anyway: I think George Coleman got his fans at least beginning from the late 70´s when there was a re-born interest in acoustic jazz again. It was then, that he could form his own Group and go on tour with them: Hilton Ruiz, Ray Drummond, Billy Higgins: This is how I heard him first. Later he had an "octet" but I missed that. 

The "Hilton Ruiz" Group was great, the most famous Album was "Amsterdam after Dark" . 

I was very Young when I first saw George Coleman and one of the first things I noticed was what a nice man he is, he smiled to the audience, thanked for applause and announced tunes, something that then in the late 70s was quite out of fashion, as there was no liner notes on albums. 

I aways had the impression that the guys who had played with Miles, tried to out-do Miles in his manners. Like, when I saw a Video of the "lost quintet" they (Chick Corea and Dave Holland)  look even more angry and "cold" than Miles. 

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I just remember being blown away by his incredible fast technique and circular breathing. Billy Higgins obviously liked it because he was grinning ear to ear.

That group with Hilton Ruiz I recall having Herbie Lewis on bass (in dungarees) - around the time ‘Amsterdam After Dark’ was recorded. In fact, they played much of that album.

Edited by sidewinder

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2 hours ago, Gheorghe said:

I also had tried to read it, but then there came a popup that I should "subscribe" so I didn´t go further.

But anyway: I think George Coleman got his fans at least beginning from the late 70´s when there was a re-born interest in acoustic jazz again. It was then, that he could form his own Group and go on tour with them: Hilton Ruiz, Ray Drummond, Billy Higgins: This is how I heard him first. Later he had an "octet" but I missed that. 

The "Hilton Ruiz" Group was great, the most famous Album was "Amsterdam after Dark" . 

I was very Young when I first saw George Coleman and one of the first things I noticed was what a nice man he is, he smiled to the audience, thanked for applause and announced tunes, something that then in the late 70s was quite out of fashion, as there was no liner notes on albums. 

I aways had the impression that the guys who had played with Miles, tried to out-do Miles in his manners. Like, when I saw a Video of the "lost quintet" they (Chick Corea and Dave Holland)  look even more angry and "cold" than Miles. 

Always a BIG fan of George: especially "Amsterdam After Dark" and the first "Eastern Rebellion" album. As mentioned already, he was really kicking it in gear then.

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