blajay

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Everything posted by blajay

  1. Removing Masking Tape from seams

    Just curious, which album, Clifford? because it sounds like one worth caring for.
  2. Roku, anyone?

    What was the problem when you tried hooking your laptop up to the tv to stream things? We're debating the same things at my place.
  3. The Nessa Juggernaut rolls on

    Hi Chuck, You'll have an order from me when I have a minute! Now listening to: Nonaah. It might have been my best purchase in the past year, or certainly one of the most listened to albums. -Jay
  4. :tup :tup I got my copy yesterday, too.
  5. Freddie Hubbard -- where to go from here?

    Bought it when it came out, shitcanned it not long after. A trumpet playing buddy of mine (and big Freddie fan) keeps touting this one to me, but I think I can live without it. Ha! I love that album, weird as it may be. And that picasso painting is a badass cover.
  6. All That Funk and More Funk are live recordings in the same style as their Timeless, Horo, Blue Note and Soul Note recordings. I'd say it's pretty hard to put those recordings into a strict category. I wouldn't consider it experimental, but they definitely explore a bit. That being said, some of those tunes, though, are just really soulful blues, even with vocals. I think you'd definitely enjoy, MG!
  7. George Adams and Don Pullen--More Funk (Palcoscenico)
  8. Milt Jackson & Ray Charles--Soul Brothers (Atlantic 1279) George Adams and Don Pullen--All That Funk (Italian Palcoscenico) This live album is the shit. Don Pullen makes Cecil Taylor seem like a slowpoke.
  9. But on second thought, you probably mean that in the works by them that you mention above, both Adorno and Kelley donned significantly different sorts of intellectual "hats" in order to fit those particular tasks/situations. If that is what you meant, it seems to me that Adorno, for better or worse, only wore one such hat, though of course his thinking altered over time (as his head swelled?). About Kelley's work, I don't yet have enough info to have an opinion. That's what I meant, yeah. I guess it didn't directly address your use of the Adorno quotes. I've had a few drinks, so this might not be clear, but here's what I've been thinking. I agree that Paul Whiteman may have been incorrectly characterized as a particularly racist oppressor for the purpose of rhetoric by a number of scholars that aren't digging deep enough. Those folks should spend some more time here! For me, and perhaps for many of what you and Allen call the "New Jazz Studies" academics, this was made clear a long time ago with Art Hodes joking around about music critics, but the reason behind the shift was more clearly articulated decades ago, when Amiri Baraka suggested that people examine the attitudes behind the music, rather than just the music itself in his essay "Jazz and the White Critic." He said: I think it is not appropriate in this instance to characterize Robin Kelley, and a number of the "New Jazz Scholars" that have been grouped in with him (interestingly many of whom are Black, although the examples of Tucker and Deveaux are exceptions), as examples of Adorno's famous idea of "regression of listening." Kelley pays close attention to the attitude behind it, and what that might mean for universal liberation. From what I know, Kelley has taken this project very personally, both in gratification and meaning, so that regressive label does not apply. From how I understand it, Kelley fits Glenn Gould's understanding of the "new listener:" one that is "no longer passively analytical: he is an associate whose tastes, preferences, and inclinations even now alter peripherally the experiences to which he gives attention." (From Gould, "The Prospects of Recording") Now to bed!
  10. Happy Birthday Muhal Richard Abrams

    Yes! Especially the tune "Roots." I listen to it over and over.
  11. Adorno, himself, was able to write Dialectic of the Enlightenment but also Towards a Theory of Musical Reproduction, both quite successfully. I don't see that being much different from Robin Kelley writing Freedom Dreams and then this Monk bio.
  12. Well, a good friend of his told me that Kelley has been taking piano lessons from Randy Weston, and that Weston has guided him in the musicology aspects of the book a bit. I thought that was pretty cool. Kelley is particularly strong at articulating the intersections of culture and politics through history, and I'm more interested in that than a purely musical analysis of Monk. That's just me, personally, though. I understand where people are coming from wanting something different, though. I anticipate that everyone will be pleased because I have heard that Kelley was especially conscious of that for this book. He's a great scholar; he's one of the best today. For folks in the Bay Area, it might be worth checking out his reading at City Lights at the end of October.
  13. I pre-ordered from Amazon, and it doesn't estimate that it will arrive until Oct. 8th. How did you get a copy already? All of Robin Kelley's works have been brilliant. I can't wait to read it.
  14. Don Cherry

    Up. I guess not?
  15. Don Cherry

    In Amiri Baraka's 1963 piece on Don Cherry in Black Music he mentioned that Cherry was writing a book. Did that ever happen, and if so, is it available? I like the way he described the group dynamics of the ensembles in which he played in his interview with Baraka, and I'd be interested to read further.
  16. Sonny Clark complete

    Yo Vic, I'm really happy for you, and I'mma let you finish, but Gokudo is the best record collector of all time! OF ALL TIME!
  17. First listen to: Classic Columbia, Okeh and Vocalion Lester Young with Count Basie (1936-1940)
  18. Bad news from Mosaic

    Yeah, I actually thought about just paying for it in addition to the Green set, now that I already have it. It's super tempting, but I think due to budget concerns, I'll pass.
  19. Bad news from Mosaic

    I received my package from Mosaic yesterday. They shipped me the Duke Pearson set instead of the Bennie Green one! Thankfully, there are still Bennie Green sets around, so they agreed to send me one and provide postage to send back the Duke Pearson set. Phew!
  20. "My work was all representational up until maybe 1960—I had a complete utter disdain for abstraction until then. I think at the same time I stopped reading novels I also abandoned representation. I remember one day when I was working at the UN and I was reading a novel, AJ Cronin or something, and I'd just finished it and said 'I don't need a singular figure telling me how a group of characters behave.' That was the last novel that I read." That is brilliant and hilarious!
  21. Dr Lonnie Smith - Rise Up!

    I saw him last night at Yoshi's SF, and I bought the CD afterward. I'll give it a listen tonight. Great show! I stayed for the second set, and it was a much better one than the first. The Hammond was a little beat up: a key came off and a couple bass pedals were making odd noises. Duct tape and a few jokes were an effective remedy, though. There was a Leslie too, but it just sat there unplayed. Peter Bernstein played well, too.
  22. Great job, Clifford. Any way this could be published as a book? It deserves it.
  23. Max Roach - that one is a fave ! Elmo - I'd be 'tickled' to find a nice copy of that one. Congrats ! Yes, I love every Roach album, really. I highly recommend that MJT+3 record, too. It's amazing to hear Muhal Richard Abrams early on playing bebop! Believe it or not, after that prior discussion in this thread, I was lucky enough to win the Elmo Hope mono LP for only $21.48 on ebay. I thought I'd be competing with you and with Clifford .
  24. Last night I spun some new finds: Daddy-O Presents MJT + 3 (with [Muhal] Richard Abrams) (Argo LP-621) Max Roach--Drums Unlimited (Atlantic SD 1467) Elmo Hope--Sounds from Rikers Island (Audio Fidelity AFLP 2119) Fantastic night of music!