Larry Kart

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Everything posted by Larry Kart

  1. Post a pic

    You guys can start up this thread again, but NO political content allowed!
  2. Asked by Lee Jeske in a 1986 interview if he had read the various biographies of him that had been published by that date, Miles says, “No. My wife [Cicely Tyson] reads them, but I don’t read them. She reads them to see if she’s in them. You know why a woman would read them. Or who I f——d. See all women are so competitive — they’re in competition with air, anything." "Seriously, if you're going to live in a world of myths created by other people, why the hell not make your own for yourself?" Sure enough. But the autobiography was not a myth that Miles made for himself -- would that it had been -- but a slop job made by Mr. Troupe.
  3. Take a look. Troupe's "reshapings" of what Miles said don't make for a better story IMO, not at all. And introducing outright factual errors, like getting wrong who played on what recording session when Miles got it right, and besides there are readily available discographies, no? Just ignorance, sloppiness, on Troupe's part; apparently he didn't give a crap or was pressed for time, maybe farmed things out to people who knew less or cared less than he did, God knows what.
  4. According to Dan Morgenstern, when Dan asked him for his opinion of the autobiography, Miles said, "I don't know -- I haven't read it." As for Troupe 'giving Miles the book he was looking for," what does that mean? Take a look at some of the examples of what Miles actually said in the interviews and what Troupe has him say in the book. Would you want -- and why would you want -- your words to be twisted that way, and with outright errors introduced? Haven't gotten to the Chambers book issue, but anyone who knows both books knows that Troupe committed highway robbery there.
  5. So, What Are You Listening To NOW?

    And Albert Stinson's bass solo on "My Joy"!!!
  6. Willie Thomas: 1931-2019

    Good player.
  7. This makes it clearer: Description Tickets Organizer Venue A release event for the “real book” anthology compiled by drummer, composer, and presenter Mike Reed. Containing fifty transcribed compositions, newly contributed bios, and insightful candid photography, the collection is “a soundtrack for a city that was yellow, illuminated by the hue of high-pressure sodium street lamps.” In cooperation with the Jazz Institute of Chicago, all proceeds from the sale of the new book will benefit the ongoing educational programs of the Institute. To celebrate, Reed and colleagues play music and video to discuss compositions in (and not in) the book, as well as music made in (and about) Chicago. So no less than "fifty transcribed compositions," not recordings of them (those are commercially available in almost every case), with bios, etc. The analogy is to the familiar "real book," but a "real book" that is done right (i.e. done accurately, not done half-assed) and that is aimed at celebrating, and perpetuating for further use, the music of the Chicago jazz scene 1980-2010.
  8. My understanding is that It's not a normal book per se, but an anthology of recordings and (I believe) scores for those carefully chosen representative pieces, with accompanying descriptions/background material on those pieces and artists. I wrote about Josh Berman and his piece, and likewise about Keefe Jackson, Mike Reed, Rich Corpolongo and their pieces. John Litweiler and others wrote about other artists and pieces. Actually, I'm not entirely sure whether the pieces will be represented by their original recordings or recordings of them by the fine band that Reed assembled to play some of those pieces at a concert last winter. I contributed about 800-1,000 words on each artist and piece I wrote about; I assume that other contributors did the same. I don't have the full list of artists and pieces in front of me, but IIRC there were about 25-30 in all. I expect it will be a handsome effort.
  9. Hub Songs

    https://www.allmusic.com/album/hub-songs-the-music-of-freddie-hubbard-mw0000031683 Had modest expectations, and was I surprised. This 1998 album of Freddie Hubbard pieces -- played by Tim Hagans, Marcus Printup, Javon Jackson, Vincent Herring, Benny Green, Peter Washington, and Kenny Washington -- is quite something. Freddie was the producer, he and board member David Weiss wrote the charts. the late Bob Belden was executive producer. The nature of the date, a semi-tribute to the damaged-lip Hubbard, made me wary, but the music-making is fresh and very intense. Hagans I've long admired (back in the early '80s I enthusiastically reviewed his first album on an obscure Cincinnati-based label), but Printup I'd thought of as just another Young Lion. Wrong -- at least on the evidence here; he's got a brain, chops, and a heart. Kudos as well to Benny Green; he plays his ass off. Engineer is Jim Anderson, also at his best. A sample: On both, Printup has the first tpt. solo, Hagans the second:
  10. Hub Songs

    IIRC, Clayton was regarded as a talented arranger long before he was unable to play.
  11. Worthwhile piece about him from the Journal of Jazz Studies: http://jjs.libraries.rutgers.edu/index.php/jjs/article/view/99/76
  12. Al Cohn

    Was reminded yesterday that Al died at age sixty-two. He had so much music left in him, was playing better than ever in his final decade.
  13. Now reading...

    Excellent book.
  14. Al Cohn

    That was a good night at the Showcase and back at the paper too. I think I wrote the review on deadline, which usually was stimulating.
  15. Al Cohn

    An Al and Zoot review: [1982] Dented here and there and almost devoid of their original bright finish, the tenor saxophones of Al Cohn and Zoot Sims look like they’ve been through the Thirty Years War, which in one sense is true. It was more than three decades ago--in January 1948--that Cohn met Sims, his new section-mate in Woody Herman’s Second Herd, and began a musical partnership that has grown steadily in meaning. Both were first-generation Lester Young disciples, and each had found a personal style within Young’s fruitful universe--Sims favoring a light, gliding, almost breezy approach while Cohn’s manner is deep-toned and rhythmically aggressive, with a moaning lyricism at its core. Several years ago a friend half-seriously suggested that each of the first wave of Lester Young disciples built his style on a specific Young solo. Al Cohn was “Tickle Toe,” Zoot Sims was “Blow Top,” Brew Moore was “Pound Cake,” and so forth. Listening to Cohn and Sims at the Jazz Showcase Wednesday night, that notion seemed to make a good deal of sense, especially when Cohn quoted “Tickle Toe” toward the end of a fast bossa nova. And it made even more sense the next day, when I played the original “Tickle Toe” and “Blow Top.” There, on “Tickle Toe,” were the hallmarks of Cohn’s style--the dense, burrowing harmonic sense and the urgent, driving swing--while the sun-drenched ease of Young’s “Blow Top” solo was equally in tune with Sims’s lighter, more lyrical approach.This type of influence redounds to the credit of all parties concerned--reminding us, on the one hand, how multifaceted Young’s art was and, on the other, how subtly and honestly Sims, Cohn, and all the other “brothers” were able to respond to their master’s voice, or perhaps that should be “their master’s voices.” Today, of course, Sims and Cohn are full-fledged masters themselves. The latter, especially, grows in stature with each passing year, to the point where it’s hard to think of another tenor saxophonist who plays with such consistent seriousness and weight. Not that Cohn is an unduly sober improviser, for his sense of humor is as sly as S.J. Perlman’s. The “Tickle Toe” quote, for instance, was sandwiched into a very unlikely harmonic cul de sac, as though Cohn wished to prove that he could state any idea at any time and get away with it--in the same way that Perlman would place a foppish, Anglophile locution alongside a phrase that spoke of the world of lox, bagels, and pastrami on rye. Sims is more variable these days, perhaps because his music depends so much on the freshness of his lyrical impulse. Swinging comes so effortlessly to him that Sims can give pleasure even when he falls back on familiar patterns. Yet when he really “sings,” as he did Wednesday night on his own familiar piece “The Red Door”--linking each phrase to the next so gracefully that the entire solo seemed a single thought--one realizes that beneath Sims’s familiar rhythmic ease there is another, richer level of invention. Circumstances dictate how often that side of Sims rises to the surface; and playing alongside Cohn is one of the circumstances that does the trick, for both men were at or near the peak of their form. Cohn and Sims must have played “The Red Door” many thousands of times, but every time it swings open on something new. BTW, it was Dan Morgenstern who told me that Al was inspired by Pres' "Tickle Toe" solo and Zoot by Pres' solo on "Blow Top."
  16. Al Cohn

    Jake's playing on Warne Marsh's "All Music" (Nessa) is superb.
  17. Al Cohn

    From Marc Meyers' Jazz Wax blog: "Bothwell's replacement was Hal McKusick, who at the time was in Los Angeles with pianist and arranger George Handy. The two had flown to California a year earlier after leaving Raeburn's band over another Bothwell incident involving Al Cohn. Hal and Handy were fed up with Raeburn handing solos written for Cohn to Bothwell."
  18. Al Cohn

    Relatively brief Cohn-Konitz review: [1980] It’s the first set at the Jazz Showcase, and alto saxophonist Lee Konitz, as he has done so often throughout his career, is coaxing sounds out of silence. Or perhaps silence is coaxing sounds out of him, for Konitz’s gravely sincere art seems always to have been based on the assumption that music of requisite purity can emerge only when the corresponding purity of silence is given its due. The song he plays is the charmingly cobwebby standard “Weaver of Dreams,” and Konitz, accompanied by bassist Jim Atlas and drummer Wilbur Campbell, approaches it as though he were rediscovering that improvisation is possible. His solo begins with abrupt tongued phrases that then are smoothed out into longer, flowing lines so firmly rooted in the theme that the point at which Victor Young’s melody has become Konitz’s personal creation is difficult to define. Then tenorman Al Cohn joins Konitz on “Yardbird Suite” and is simply ferocious, a man who seems to have been born again as a musician since he cut back on his labors as an arranger. Initially inspired by Lester Young, Cohn has built his sound into a huge, elementally dark force. And the rhythmic undercarriage that supports all this tonal and melodic weight is so imposing in itself that one feels that Cohn, in his rebirth, has revived the aesthetically rather dormant soul of Sonny Rollins as well. Cohn is alone with the rhythm section now, and he plays “Do Nothing Till You Hear From Me” at a very down tempo, as though he were out to prove that his recent gains in rhythmic power enable him to set into useful motion what seems likely to be inanimate. And he does just that, roaring like a lion of Judea. (Cohn and Konitz may be the two quintessentially Jewish jazz musicians--Cohn a fierce Maccabean rabbi of the tenor saxophone, Konitz the alto’s Talmudic scholar.)
  19. Al Cohn

    Agree about the Xanadu albums. I got to see Al fairly regularly in Chicago in the early '80s, and it was a joy, especially one gig where he was paired with Lee Konitz. On a visit to Copenhagen, Al was asked if he'd tried the estimable Danish brew Elephant Beer. "No, man," Al replied, "I drink to forget."
  20. The last two movements of the string quartet Op. 95 swing like crazy:
  21. Brilliant piece -- brings a lot back to mind, and John's judgments are spot on.
  22. Check out the fugal passage that begins at about 5:10 or the ending of the movement, from 10:30 on. If those syncopations toward the very end don't swing, I don't know what does. One of my favorite recordings BTW.
  23. There some fairly swinging moments in the Scherzo of Op. 106 and IIRC in the first movement as well: