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TheMusicalMarine

Boogie Woogie and Stride recommendations

22 posts in this topic

I'd like to explore this sub genre, specifically Meade Lux Lewis, Albert Ammons, Willie "The Lion" Smith, and James. P. Johnson. Would prefer to avoid compilations. Any help would be most appreciated.

Thanks.

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Try to find "The First Day" by Albert Ammons and Meade Lux Lewis, which was the material recorded at Blue Note's first session. I am mightily impressed by Albert Ammons.

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For Albert Ammons I strongly recommend the Classics CD covering the years 1936 to 1939. It gives us a chance to hear Albert's solo piano, his jumping little Chicago-based band, plus some fine blues playing by Frank Newton, JC Higginbotham, and Harry James.

Edited by Brownian Motion

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Stride ?

Just hunt up all the Fats Waller, James P. Johnson, Willie The Lion and Dick Wellstood you can find.

When all is said and done Fats is the stride cat for me and a couple of quintessential tracks are Carolina Shout and Handful Of Keys. These shouldn't be hard to find at all.

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For boogie woogie, you'll want to hear Jimmy Yancey. I'd try "The Complete Recorded Works, Vol. 1" (Document). Yancey's no powerhouse, like Ammons, but he's deep.

For stride, don't miss "Harlem Piano -- Luckey Roberts and Willie The Lion Smith" (OJC). It's good Lion but fantastic Roberts (with both men well-recorded in late '50s stereo). What a composer he was! Check out "Inner Space" for one. For Lion at his best, I'd seek out his Commodore solo performances, recorded in 1939 (I believe), which must be available somewhere on CD now. (I have them on LP.)

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Those Commodores are on the Chronogical Classics of Lion that span 1939 (may be on one disc or two, can't recall.) Great stuff. The later Commodores are wonderful as well. Well heck, I love Smith and love everything I've heard (not all of it stride).

I love the Yancy that is on George Buck's "Solo Art" label. . . wonderful stuff; have to find more! Harold and I love the same cats, and I agree that Fats and Wellstood are worth seeking out anything and anything.

James P. Johnson is definitely someone to study as well for stride and Harlem piano; the Smithsonian/Folkways cd is really incredible!

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James P: Early stride recordings 1921; go all through the 1920s, can't go wrong, and you can watch the style developing, particularly as the influence of Armstrong hits. A particular peak, however, are the 1939s, which include If Dreams Come True. For boogie I like Jimmy Yancey, more subtle than the others, very deep. Other stride - there are some Lucky Roberts recordings on George Buck's label, can't remember the dates, probably 1940s, but they are the earliest things available (other than 1919 accompaniments to the Black Crows, I think); Look for Donald Lamberts LPs from his comeback(don't know if they are on CD; great notes by Wellstood) - there are some Eubie Blake Lps which include recordings from the early 1920s; very East Coast in their lack of deep swing with one or two exceptions (Sounds of Africa, Ma). Interesting, though. Look for Jimmy Blythe, also - pianist from Chicago, less known, recorded with both jazz and blues people, and has a 1924 recording which may be the first with the boogie bass line (can't think of the title right off).

Edited by AllenLowe

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For boogie-woogie, don't forget Pete Johnson! The first volume on Classics will do very nicely. The sides with Joe Turner, Buster Smith and Hot Lips Page give me religion.

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Look for Jimmy Blythe, also - pianist from Chicago, less known, recorded with both jazz and blues people, and has a 1924 recording which may be the first with the boogie bass line (can't think of the title right off).

Chicago Stomp?

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KILLER STRIDE........................Dick Hyman. Some Rags, Some Stomps & A Little Blues.

Edited by jazzman4133

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More Dick Hyman Stride............STRIDEMONSTER.

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Another strong recommendation for the Jimmy Yancey recordings, though I have the softest spot for the late Atlantics (first sides I heard by him).

This is also a worthy purchase (and then some):

72697.jpg

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I'll third the recommendation for Harlem Piano. I have the LP and can't comment on CD availability, but fun music.

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:tup:tup

I have the cd, I have a burn of the French "Jazz Tribune" version and a burn of the original lps.

Guess I like it!

:g

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:tup:tup

I have the cd, I have a burn of the French "Jazz Tribune" version and a burn of the original lps.

Guess I like it!

:g

Jimmy Cheatham borrowed my lps and "forgot" to return 'em. :(

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One thing I really love about the MEMOIRS recordings... not only was Lion a hell of a pianist, he had a great voice as well as a really unique way with narrative.

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The RCA set was a "remake/expansion" of a 1957 Dot lp titled The Lion Roars.

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I wanted to mention that if you are looking for examples of stride and boogie-woogie in vintage vinyl places, check with the nice man at the counter to see if they are in a separate section from their jazz stuff. I know that quite often they are, as is Dixieland. Some vintage guys don't consider those as jazz in the classic sense. I don't know why.

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Look for Donald Lamberts LPs from his comeback(don't know if they are on CD; great notes by Wellstood)

I guess this is the CD reissue of the LPs you mention:

Lambert.gif

One of my favorite stride piano records. Just listen to "Hallellujah"!

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