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pasta

Weirdo LP scored that turned out great?

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For me, one of the top ones is Jay Berliner "All Bananas Are Created Equal" Snagged it because it was a Mainstream LP, and I am a fan of that stuff.......judging by the cover, was afraid it would be at best nice background stuff..................WAS I WRONG! Quite a funky soulful session.............

Edited by pasta

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Happens sometimes for me, too, and I like it when it does... got a great Italian ethno-psych record a few years ago called Aktuala that, to my knowledge, hasn't been reissued. Nobody on it I'd heard of, but it's brilliant.

Bought a Ray Russell LP years back that pretty much was my entree into British Jazz...

Jay Berliner is a good player, I might add, but yeah - it could've been a snoozer!

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Ed Motta's "Dwitza" was like that for me.

motta_ed~~~_dwitza~~~_101b.jpg

Was just curious, snagged it, and fell in love with it. The next two he released after that, "Poptikal" and "Aystelum" are also excellent.

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I am an avid vinyl sniffer in dusty record shops, so, a part silicosis, most of the times it happens just the contrary: apparently great LP turned out weirdo :wacko:

I presume that is the reason because they are still on the shelves!

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Bought a Ray Russell LP years back that pretty much was my entree into British Jazz...

Turn Circle?

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No, the RCA. So you could say I started at the freest and moved backwards...

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Ed Motta's "Dwitza" was like that for me. 

motta_ed~~~_dwitza~~~_101b.jpg

Was just curious, snagged it, and fell in love with it.  The next two he released after that, "Poptikal" and "Aystelum" are also excellent.

Wow! My ex-girlfriend gave me a copy of this album (she said the saxophone solo on- I think- the opening track sounded like me! :w ). We broke up not long after and I haven't played it since... Will have to revisit.

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Louis Armstrong's Hot 5 on Columbia - over 45 years ago. I bought it early in my "jazz life" 'cause it was the most interesting lp cover in the bins.

I'd seen Pops all over tv in the '50s but this looked different.

Within 6 years I was recording Roscoe Mitchell and Lester Bowie.

Edited by Chuck Nessa

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Good thing you didn't buy a David Rose album instead...

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Good thing you didn't buy a David Rose album instead...

No telling what I might have forced Leroy Jenkins into.

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A dress with a plunging neckline?

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A dress with a plunging neckline?

Only on holidays. :P

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The album that falls into this catagory for me is "My Kind Of Music" which was put together by Garry Moore.

Now, Garry Moore to me was a kind of bland, affible guy from the fifties and early sixties, who had a variety show on TV.

We had two channels when I was a kid and his show was one my parents watched.

He introduced Carol Burnett to the world.

I found myself drawn to this album because the personnel looked promising.

I talked about it on another thread, but I think it deserves another mention.

The players are:

Wild Bill Davison

Ernie Caceres

Mel Henke

Randy Hall

Sonny Terry

George Barnes

and

Garry Moore [who joins in on the grand finale at the end].

This album is pure gold, even if you only listen to Wild Bill rip out his heart on Side 2, playing "Yesterdays" backed by a full string orchestra. WOW!!!!. The rest of the album is excellent, but that one track is worth the price of admission.

When I mentioned the album to my very best friend in the whole world, he cut me a CD from both of the follow-up albums.

So now I have the trilogy.

Wondrous!!

Moore says in his liner notes that Yesterdays was the reason he put together the album and I can see why.

That was the session that gave birth to two albums for Davison, "With Strings Attached" and "Pretty Wild", which, like Yesterdays were arranged around Davison's raw, visceral cornet, backed by a string orchestra.

Best accidental acquisition of an LP for me, to date. FINE!

Edited by patricia

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Yes Patricia, that's a FINE lp!

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Bought this just 'cuz I like the cover. Music was pretty good too.RasputinsStash.jpg

Edited by Jad

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Well that's "Rasputin's Stash" by Cody Hanson!

(I cheated, I looked at the properties of the image and looked it up, there's a copy on ebay right now).

Funk?

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Why, I thought that everybody knew that Rasputin's Stash was the brainchild of session musician Martin Dumas Jr. and was a '70s soul/funk ensemble from the Windy City of Chicago, IL.

In the early '70s, Dumas assembled an eight-piece group out of fellow session regulars from the city. Signed early on to the Cotillion label, the group released a self-titled album in 1971 and gradually lost half of their members by the time they recorded their second album for Gemigo, a subsidiary of Curtis Mayfield's Curtom imprint. The quartet — Dumas, Ernest Frank Donaldson, Bruce Butler, and Paul Coleman — shed the possessive of their band name for another self-titled album, released in 1974. Gemigo eventually went under, and the group was shifted over to Curtom proper for a pair of singles released in the latter part of the decade: "Dance With Me" was released as r-Stash in 1977, and "Booty March" was released as Stash the year following. In a distribution switch that saw Curtom move from Warner Bros. to RSO, the label's roster was gutted and Stash was one of the victims. After that, the group opted to quit, but not before they did plenty of shows in New York and their hometown, where they were most appreciated. Throughout the years, Rasputin's Stash and all its following incarnations endured as rare groove favorites. In 2000, the U.K.-based Sequel label issued The Devil Made Me Do It, a CD compilation of the group's Gemigo material, including several unreleased cuts that were intended for their third album.

Yours in Rasputinianic ethics of attribution,

Mandy Kell

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What is that damn thing?

Thank you for asking, Clifford. I thought everybody but me must know, so was hesitant to ask.;)

Speaking of Cotillion, I picked up a 45 the other day on that label, by Brook Benton called "Soul Santa", which is unusual in that both sides are the same song, a soul Christmas song, same arrangement, slightly different lyrics. Both sides are labelled "plug side promotion copy". I've always loved Brook Benton, but had never heard this song before. This is a spotless copy, one of a half dozen 45s I bought at the same time, stored in individual zip-lock bags.

Edited by patricia

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Sorry 'bout the short explanation. Was short on time and meant to get back to it later, but it looks like Jim filled y'all in better than I could.

Anyway, Rasputin's Stash, yeah, good funk album. Remind of War just a bit, rather than Parliament/Funkadelic style. Found it cheap at a used record store and bought it solely for the cover (which I think is priceless)

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