Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
colllin

Rare straight ahead jazz guitar recordings

66 posts in this topic

I love that Galbraith record. Gotta find that Thornell Schwartz!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, he recorded fairly often, especially in his later years, but there's a wonderful set of duets between Ira Sullivan and Joe Dioro -- THE BREEZE AND I -- worth tracking down.

31Hg6YM1EGL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Rory Stuart is another fine guitarist whose work seems to have gone relatively unnoticed. There's HURRICANE on Sunnyside, a few sideman appearances...

Thar Joe Cinderella date was released in 2001, and is now well OOP, but, thanks to Youtube, you can get a sense of what the man's eight-string work sounds like.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umrB-VJV-jI

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And here is the legendary Dennis Sandole. Much read about but rarely heard, by me at least.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLOiAjjPIS8&feature=relmfu

Joe Cinderella sounds interesting also. He is using an eight string with a special tuning. Unfortunately he appears to have a youtube comments stalker.

Edited by freelancer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was kind of disappointed because his sound and playing concept was noticeably different from his playing on the Tadd Dameron Capitol sides, which I really love.

Same here. Also the Dameron Royal Roost broadcasts, where he's featured even more prominently. What a beautiful sound.

From the site I linked above:

John Collins was the guitarist of choice for many years in the 40s and 50s,

he finally recorded under his own name in Paris and L. A, with

Harry Edison, Dolo Coker, Jimmy Woode, John Heard and Alvin Queen.

Edited by Pete C

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the regular guys, but I love the rare ones too. Especially someone who brought something unique to the table. Who do you recommend?

When I look at the responses here, and then look back at your question, and then look again at the responses... I'm not sure if you're sure what you wanted, and whether you're getting what you asked for. Some very good suggestions here already, but quite a few of the players mentioned are anything but "rare" in terms of having considerable fame, and numerous recordings (some on major labels). I'm also not sure how "straight" you prefer your "straight ahead". At any rate, it's all good, I'm just not sure how much you've already heard, or what exactly you're looking for. The actual "rare" ones are kind of pointless to recommened, because... well, they're rare. :) You're not going to find them, most likely.

I'll add these names, all highly recommended:

Louis Stewart

Ron Eschete'

Joshua Breakstone

Mark Elf

Reg Schwager

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the regular guys, but I love the rare ones too. Especially someone who brought something unique to the table. Who do you recommend?

When I look at the responses here, and then look back at your question, and then look again at the responses... I'm not sure if you're sure what you wanted, and whether you're getting what you asked for. Some very good suggestions here already, but quite a few of the players mentioned are anything but "rare" in terms of having considerable fame, and numerous recordings (some on major labels). I'm also not sure how "straight" you prefer your "straight ahead". At any rate, it's all good, I'm just not sure how much you've already heard, or what exactly you're looking for. The actual "rare" ones are kind of pointless to recommened, because... well, they're rare. :) You're not going to find them, most likely.

I'll add these names, all highly recommended:

Louis Stewart

Ron Eschete'

Joshua Breakstone

Mark Elf

Reg Schwager

I don't mind the criteria being stretched a little. I've heard the work of the most famous jazz guitarists, but I have very spotty exposure to the rest of the field. I like it pretty strait ahead as opposed to fused with non-jazz genres. Rare stuff that I would have to work a little to find is good - I like the hunt. But you're right - if it's super-rare, such suggustions would just be a tease. Thanks to all who have replied and all who will!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Though not too well-known stateside, Dutch guitarist Wim Overgaauw cut some really nice dates in the '60s and '70s, esp. with Pim Jacobs and Rita Reys.

Also, I second the mention of Sonny Greenwich.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as one or two sessions, there have been some interesting ones mentioned.

Allen already brought up Al Gafa:

051977.jpg

And then there's Michael Howell:

087895.jpg

Chuck Wayne made more than one session, but not that many, I believe:

094159.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

R-1511338-1225100382.jpeg

This is also a really interesting record. Harde sounds like a bent, classical Jimmy Raney.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chuck Wayne was mentioned above, thought I plug Morning Mist too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i'll go the route of suggesting someone who not many folks have heard of - Jeffrey Burr. as far as i know he only has two available recording:

415YSdS7s-L._SL500_AA280_.jpg

41TkQcSKpEL._SS500_.jpg

imo, both are excellent and easily worth owning. i found out about him through Pandora radio. i had some type of jazz guitar station going and some tune from Bright Blue came on and i said to myself, "I must get this record." sometimes following through on that kind of thing ends up being disappointing. not here man. excellent guitarist.

this is Burr playing one of my favorite standards:

enjoy!

Edited by thedwork

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple more guitar heroes who recorded only one (or two) albums under their names...

8ea719a80375.jpg

post-21-1256809273.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple more guitar heroes who recorded only one (or two) albums under their names...

8ea719a80375.jpg

post-21-1256809273.jpg

Richie Garcia was a friend of my parents, and played at their wedding in 1951!!! He was a native New Yorker, and was present on several George Shearing Quintet albums.

I like the regular guys, but I love the rare ones too. Especially someone who brought something unique to the table. Who do you recommend?

When I look at the responses here, and then look back at your question, and then look again at the responses... I'm not sure if you're sure what you wanted, and whether you're getting what you asked for. Some very good suggestions here already, but quite a few of the players mentioned are anything but "rare" in terms of having considerable fame, and numerous recordings (some on major labels). I'm also not sure how "straight" you prefer your "straight ahead". At any rate, it's all good, I'm just not sure how much you've already heard, or what exactly you're looking for. The actual "rare" ones are kind of pointless to recommened, because... well, they're rare. :) You're not going to find them, most likely.

I'll add these names, all highly recommended:

Louis Stewart

Ron Eschete'

Joshua Breakstone

Mark Elf

Reg Schwager

I'll second Joshua Breakstone, who has put out several great recordings!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Richie Garcia = Dick Garcia?

Another one:

46086021.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Richie Garcia = Dick Garcia?

Yes, that was the cover of the original issue. Dawn shortly after released the same album with a new cover (and a new first name for its leader!)

44130646.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That blue cover is the one I know... nice album! Got the Blue Moon/Fresh Sound CD reissue.

There's a nice Joe Puma one there, too, "Wild Kitten".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I knew Diorio's playing - a little - from the inside out, so to speak, as I studied his book Intervallic Designs. My introduction to musodom. IIRC that had a 7inch of him playing. Only found out in the CD epoch that he recorded. I think he's on quite a few though - not as many as Tal Farlow, Allen... I find his stuff clever but cold. That's just me: I don't much like listening to guitar playing, even though, or maybe because, I used to play it. Not as well as Joe, possibly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boulou and Elios Ferre have recorded a lot, but they're worth checking out if you don't know their work - Django's true heirs - at least imo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I knew Diorio's playing - a little - from the inside out, so to speak, as I studied his book Intervallic Designs. My introduction to musodom. IIRC that had a 7inch of him playing. Only found out in the CD epoch that he recorded. I think he's on quite a few though - not as many as Tal Farlow, Allen... I find his stuff clever but cold. That's just me: I don't much like listening to guitar playing, even though, or maybe because, I used to play it. Not as well as Joe, possibly.

Diorio sounds awkward to me. Those big jumps don't always fit.

A few more - John Stowell, Ted Greene.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Richie Garcia = Dick Garcia?

Another one:

46086021.jpg

Yes, on these shores, "Dick" is a commonly used nickname for "Richard". Think "Tricky Dicky Nixon"!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not "rare" perhaps (easily obtainable), but this is a marvelous recording IMO:

102.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't say he's been marginalized recording-wise - there are a bunch of discs with him leading or as the sole voice - but I don't think the jazz-guitar establishment has caught up to Dom Minasi yet. His two new digital releases - one solo, one a duo with Karl Berger - are absolutely gorgeous.

Not "rare" perhaps (easily obtainable), but this is a marvelous recording IMO:

102.JPG

Looks great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I almost mentioned Minasi, but maybe he's a bit to the left of straight ahead. I saw him once live and found him to have lots of Ornette in his conception. I'm not that familiar with Joe Diorio but I like him on Eddie Harris's Come On Down.

Edited by Pete C

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.