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alocispepraluger102

funniest words in the language

43 posts in this topic

Bazooka. You would expect destruction on a grand scale from something like this.

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Concubine.

Can't say it with a straight face.

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I learn a lot of funny British words by doing British-style cryptic crosswords (Guardian, Times, Private Eye). One can pick up the idiom pretty quickly. Some good ones are the aforementioned yob (and variants like yobbo), bumf, bonkbuster :blink: , ladette and saddo.

Just recalled frottage, a recent discovery and apparent favorite of Private Eye magazine, which is near the top of my charts...

Edited by T.D.

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Jumblies!

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Around these parts, there's the term 'mingin(g)' - stinking to high heaven - and 'minger' - one who does/is this. I always liked that one.

MG

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Does it have to be English?

Like the Japanese word Chinpunkanpun, meaning gibberish. The language is rich in onomatopoeia.

From Sheffield there's lairy - flashy and selfserving, nesh- always cold, snap - packed lunch, geeor - stop it, lugoyle - ear , chabby - infant, mash- make tea and countless others.

Edited by kinuta

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From Sheffield there's...nesh- always cold...

Interesting. About 20 miles south 'nesh' means scared. A 'nesher' is someone who runs away from a fight.

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Titter.

It means giggle, but seems suggestive somehow. ("Giggle" is kind of funny, too.)

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From Sheffield there's...nesh- always cold...

Interesting. About 20 miles south 'nesh' means scared. A 'nesher' is someone who runs away from a fight.

Right, that is interesting. Nesh most definitely means sensitive to cold in Sheffield.

Cold, as in 'It's cold today' is parky.

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And 30 miles west of Sheffield nesh still has the Sheffield meaning. We say parky, too, though 10 days ago it was brass monkeys.

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Roower - cry , bawl, shed tears, as in Shurrup roowering - stop crying.

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