JSngry

BFT 105 Discussion Thread

86 posts in this topic

1. WTF? And I mean that literally. It goes by so quick I don't know what the hell they're selling. But since it must be a jazzer , yeah, I'm buying.

2. Really, really dug this a lot. The voice is instantly captivating, insinuating. Hell I even dug the soprano solo and when the hell do you hear me say that?

3. What I liked about track 2 is entirely absent on this. Where track two instantly grabbed me, by the time this one ends I wish she'd just take the damn party somewhere else. Bitch.

OK, so I peeked. :g

4. No guesses but I liked this a lot. Perfect length too. Too much of a good thing is sometimes ... too much.

5. "Look good - feel good"? I know the derivation of the Fernando's Hideaway bit on SNL but I'm going to guess Billy Crystal.

Can you dig it, Face? I knew that you could.

6. Nat Cole. Do I actually get credit even though Jim told us ahead of time? Color me curious as to why this particular track is worthy of a BFT.

7. OK in the hierarchy of the (so far) trio of 70s-inflected female vocal tracks, this one raises the bitch's track up a notch. Don't like the production/fidelity either. NEXT.

8. Never got the bug to go deep into the Latin Jazz thing (I've got one Eddie Palmieri disc, and that only because of the presence of Brian Lynch. But this ... well this doesn't make me rethink that choice not to go down the Latin Jazz road, but I'm not switching this off either. Me likey mucho.

9. Well ... yeah, but I still prefer the Ray "auditions" spot for Pepsi.

10. Wow, actual, no-doubt-about-it instrumental JAZZ on a BFT. Whodathunk it? :P

Big tenor in the 78 era. Ike Quebec pops into my head but not gruff enough.

11. This is a WTF track, and not in a good way. Couldn't keep with it after the chorus came in.

12. No guesses but I'd be this girl's lazy bones any day of the week.

13. Comparing science to music? Has to be Kenton, right? Never found him remotely enjoyable.

14. Really enjoyed this tenor but no guesses.

Thanks a lot Jim, it wasn't nearly as painful as I feared and I'm looking forward to the answers.

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What a great idea! I've always wanted to play a game of Scrabble using words which don't exist, but which sound real. And you would have to come up with a plausible definition.

Not just that..but take notes, and compile a dictionary as you go along. After soon enough, new language. New language, new sounds, new sounds, new life. Or at least different.

Either way - best...Christmas....EVER!!!!

That sent me back to one of my favourite comedy books

Pan-32220+Adams+%26+Lloyd+Deeper+Meaning+of+Liff.jpg

It's a dictionary of words that don't exist for things that do exist but don't have words for them - the words given are railway stations around the world. eg

Amlwch - A British Rail sandwich which has been kept soft by being regularly washed and resealed in clingfilm.

Peoria - The fear of peeling too few potatoes.

Klosters - The little drops of dried urine on the rim of the bowl under the seat.

MG

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1. WTF? And I mean that literally. It goes by so quick I don't know what the hell they're selling. But since it must be a jazzer , yeah, I'm buying.

Jim R correctly identified this one, and it's a safe buy since it has no cholesterol at all!!!

2. Really, really dug this a lot. The voice is instantly captivating, insinuating. Hell I even dug the soprano solo and when the hell do you hear me say that?

When I finally decided what direction to go on this BFT, I looked at this one objectively and though hmmm....female vocals, electric piano and bass, soprano solos, extra percussion sweetening, and an overall "urban" groove. If they get past all that, hey, it'll all be good from there!!! :g

And so far, people are not just getting past it, they're liking it. So yeah, good day at the office!

3. What I liked about track 2 is entirely absent on this. Where track two instantly grabbed me, by the time this one ends I wish she'd just take the damn party somewhere else. Bitch.

OK, so I peeked. :g

Fair enough, including the peeking. I would suggest that Chuck Rainey is extra-slinky on this one, so a few extra listenings with that in mind might pay off if that sort of thing appeals to you. But if not, at least you've added one more cut to your Blue Note collection. :cool:

4. No guesses but I liked this a lot. Perfect length too. Too much of a good thing is sometimes ... too much.

Couldn't agree more!

5. "Look good - feel good"? I know the derivation of the Fernando's Hideaway bit on SNL but I'm going to guess Billy Crystal.

Not Crystal, but that would not be a bad guess, not at all.

Can you dig it, Face? I knew that you could.

And considering that Michael Young's nickname around here is "Face" (as in "face of the franchise")...I don't know that he had any choice but to dig it...

6. Nat Cole. Do I actually get credit even though Jim told us ahead of time? Color me curious as to why this particular track is worthy of a BFT.

Included for several reasons - as a probably-only-in-my-mind funny followup to the selection before (will explain in the reveal), as an example of an incredible orchestral blend accomplished through player sensitivity and not engineering manipulation, as an example of incredible engineering catching all the nuances of the orchestra (the band interlude might well be the naturally loudest - i.e. - natural dynamics not achieved through compression - spot on this entire compilation) and room sound (the sound here almost literally breathes to my ears), and primarily because Nat takes an at-best average song, a pretty good arrangement, a perfect tempo, and then adds some of the most frighteningly casually perfect time that I've ever heard come out of any singers mouth, ever. I mean, the guy rides this groove like it's a horse, and a horse that he was born riding. Hell, maybe he's actually a centaur...have you ever seen him fully undressed? Nor have I!

7. OK in the hierarchy of the (so far) trio of 70s-inflected female vocal tracks, this one raises the bitch's track up a notch. Don't like the production/fidelity either. NEXT.

Figured this one would get mixed responses, and it has. I'm hardwired for Pavlovian enjoyment of that early-70s Rhodes, woody-bass, splashy cymbals sound, but not everybody is. So, as my best friend Saul Goode says, different strokes, beautiful world.

8. Never got the bug to go deep into the Latin Jazz thing (I've got one Eddie Palmieri disc, and that only because of the presence of Brian Lynch. But this ... well this doesn't make me rethink that choice not to go down the Latin Jazz road, but I'm not switching this off either. Me likey mucho.

Glad you enjoy this. I first found this one on a blog and first heard it on the iPod while walking, and I found myself replaying it over and over, and walking a little faster each time. So consider this my contribution to the ongoing national effort to Keep The O-Board Broke - But Fit!

9. Well ... yeah, but I still prefer the Ray "auditions" spot for Pepsi.

Ray was all about options! :tophat:

10. Wow, actual, no-doubt-about-it instrumental JAZZ on a BFT. Whodathunk it? :P

Yeah, betcha didn't see THAT one coming! :g

Big tenor in the 78 era. Ike Quebec pops into my head but not gruff enough.

Not Ike, but not a bad guess. MG ID'ed it. One of my favorite tenorists, period.

11. This is a WTF track, and not in a good way. Couldn't keep with it after the chorus came in.

Another one I figured would get mixed responses, and it has. Saul Goode made me do it!

12. No guesses but I'd be this girl's lazy bones any day of the week.

Don't let those bones get too lazy when the fish bite at your line, if you know what I'm sayin'...

13. Comparing science to music? Has to be Kenton, right? Never found him remotely enjoyable.

Who else!

Actually, over the last year I've come to a much better and fuller appreciation of the whole Kenton thing (and almost included his version of "Sodomy" from his Hair album - don't laugh, it's a great feature for Jack Sheldon, for real...but couldn't make it fit into the overall flow of the mix), so I'm not mocking him here. But you know, you say stuff like that, especially when you say it with such...sincerity, hey...fair game, right? :ph34r:

14. Really enjoyed this tenor but no guesses.

Glad you enjoyed it. Identified earlier, and I do think the album from which this came would be something right up your alley.

Thanks a lot Jim, it wasn't nearly as painful as I feared and I'm looking forward to the answers.

HA!

You're very welcome, and thank you for your participation and enjoyment. I know that if there was anything on here that you really didn't like, there would be no doubt about it! :g

Edited by JSngry

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5. "Look good - feel good"? I know the derivation of the Fernando's Hideaway bit on SNL but I'm going to guess Billy Crystal.

Can you dig it, Face? I knew that you could.

I almost guessed Billy, too.

"Where's your messiah NOW??? Yeah... yeah... where's your Moses now, see? Let my people go NOW! Yeah... yeah.... where's your Moses... NNNNOWWW????"

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If we have any compulsive sleuths out there, here's a few things to consider tackling -

  1. The connection between Tracks 11 & 12. The nature of the connection itself is a pretty basic one, although how it plays out is more than a little..."unexpected".
  2. I know I said No Holiday Songs on this mix, and I meant it, but I recently uncovered something on one track, one thing fairly deep in the mix on one song that could be used to attempt to prosecute the case that I did not keep my word after all. Entirely accidental, and not even explicitly "Holiday", but seldom found in any other context.
  3. The ID of Track Four...everybody's been going in one direction, maybe the answer can be found by going the other way,

So - if you have waaaayyy too much time on your hands (or not enough motivation to do actual work at this time of year), allow me to provide you with a viable distraction.

And if you've not yet placed you comments, c'mon in, the door's still wide open!

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Haven't read the responses yet,

01. Jon Hendericks. (I've seen him live at least 12 times. I couldn't miss this one)

02. Rare Silk

03. Marlena Shaw

04. no idea.

05. no idea. Someone playing Al Jolson

06. Nat King Cole

07. no idea

08. no idea

09. Ray charles and Aretha Franklyn. ( a give away)

10. Gene Ammons

11. no idea

12. no idea

13. no idea

14. Les McCann and Eddie Harris.

Edited by Hardbopjazz

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Haven't read the responses yet,

01. Jon Hendericks. (I've seen him live at least 12 times. I couldn't miss this one)

Correct.

02. Rare Silk

Not Rare Silk, and not a vocal group. One singer overdubbing all vocal parts. Yet to be correctly identified.

03. Marlena Shaw

Correct.

04. no idea.

Yet to be correctly identified.

05. no idea. Someone playing Al Jolson

Not only is that an idea, it's a correct idea!

06. Nat King Cole

Correct.

07. no idea

Yet to be correctly identified.

08. no idea

Leader & trumpet soloist previously identified.

09. Ray charles and Aretha Franklyn. ( a give away)

Correct on all counts, although you might have to pay for the Coke itself.

10. Gene Ammons

Correct.

11. no idea

Yet to be correctly identified.

12. no idea

Previously identified.

13. no idea

Previously identified.

14. Les McCann and Eddie Harris.

Correct.

Thank you for your participation and for your concise answers!

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My guesses and comments:

1. I hear Jon Hendricks very clearly. It is not Lambert and Ross with him. I am not familiar with this song.

2. This female vocalist has a beautiful quality to her voice. I really like her singing. The soprano sax player is playing the kind of solo that almost all soprano sax players played in the 1970s. I used to think of it as "Coltrane-lite", influenced by Coltrane but without his overwhelming intensity of spirit. Someone like Joe Farrell would have played a soprano sax solo like this in the 1970s. I think this was recorded long after Joe's passing though.

3. Marlena Shaw from her "Who Is This Bitch Anyway" 1970s Blue Note album. I saw her live in a 1970s fusion all stars concert about five years ago. She was goofing around onstage too much, not singing enough.

4. I really like the guitar and saxophone solos, and have no idea who it is. I want to know! This is an album I would go out and buy. Now watch, I already own it.

5. I do not know who is doing this comedy bit. It reminds me of Second City.

6. Nat King Cole with a swanky big band. I really like this, and do not have it.

7. Clara Hill singing with Jazzanova, the song "That Night".

8. Is this Willie Bobo? I absolutely love this track. If I don't already own it, I will for sure get it after it is identified. This is exactly why I participate in the Blindfold Tests, to discover great songs like this!!!!!!

9. Ray and Aretha--I had never heard this before.

10. Gene Ammons. I have this on a collection of early Chess recordings by Jug and Sonny Stitt, which is one of my favorite albums.

11. This is either an early jazz rock fusion experiment, or someone recent who is trying to play in that style. It has a more recent sound to me somehow. I do not recognize the players. There is a body of early jazz rock fusion that sounds like this, risk taking, not jelling completely, but exciting, with the players going for broke and seeming not to care if it totally works.

12. This singer sounds somewhat like Dinah Washington but is not Dinah. A very Duke Ellington jungle band style trombone sound. I do not know who this is.

13. I found this to be quite humorous. It reminds me of the box set I have, "The Beat Generation". I do not know who is talking.

41ezsjsobgL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

14. I like the tenor sax player but cannot identify him.

This was a very appealing, very interesting Blindfold Test. Songs 4, 8 and 11 will have to be added to my collection if I do not already have them! It would be common for me to own them and not remember.

Edited by Hot Ptah

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My guesses and comments:

1. I hear Jon Hendricks very clearly. It is not Lambert and Ross with him. I am not familiar with this song.

Jim R identified the source, it's a jingle for a Mazola TV ad. The other singers may well be wife Judith and/or daughter Michelle, since they were touring together around the same time this jingle was on the air.

2. This female vocalist has a beautiful quality to her voice. I really like her singing. The soprano sax player is playing the kind of solo that almost all soprano sax players played in the 1970s. I used to think of it as "Coltrane-lite", influenced by Coltrane but without his overwhelming intensity of spirit. Someone like Joe Farrell would have played a soprano sax solo like this in the 1970s. I think this was recorded long after Joe's passing though.

Glad you like the this one. Recorded in 2003. The sopranoist is active on today's scene, better know as a tenor player. His core style is the same when playing jazz as it is here. As Jeff Crompton noted, there's no compromise of musicality, no "playing down" to the material. That's a constant in this singer's work, also.

3. Marlena Shaw from her "Who Is This Bitch Anyway" 1970s Blue Note album. I saw her live in a 1970s fusion all stars concert about five years ago. She was goofing around onstage too much, not singing enough.

That's too bad (about her live performance, not about your guess, which is spot on!). She's made some really good records (including this one). She's got a fine voice and can do the "attitude" thing really well, but when attitude turns into schtick...unfortunate.

4. I really like the guitar and saxophone solos, and have no idea who it is. I want to know! This is an album I would go out and buy. Now watch, I already own it.

You might! Once again, these are all well known players, especially the leader. But this might not be one of his better-known (or typical) albums.

5. I do not know who is doing this comedy bit. It reminds me of Second City.

Previously identified as The National Lampoon Radio Hour, very early 1970s, but there might have been some cross-polination between them and Second City. I don't know. But it wouldn't surprise me.

6. Nat King Cole with a swanky big band. I really like this, and do not have it.

I don't know that it's commonly available on any anthologies or anything, more of a "deep" album cut, and on an album (that has seen CD reissue) that had no real hits on it (in its original form, not sure about any reissue-added bonus cuts). But still, tasty!

7. Clara Hill singing with Jazzanova, the song "That Night".

WHOA! Was laying 60-40 odds that this one went unidentified altogether, but ding goes the bell here! Wrong singer, but right band and right song. Do you follow Jazzanova much? I find that when I like them, I really like them, and it's the same when I don't like them. And this is one of the ones I really like.

8. Is this Willie Bobo? I absolutely love this track. If I don't already own it, I will for sure get it after it is identified. This is exactly why I participate in the Blindfold Tests, to discover great songs like this!!!!!!

Always good to see extra-large fonts in the service of the conveyance of pleasure instead of anger! :g

And yes, it is Willie Bobo. The trumpet soloist has been identified as Jimmy Owens, but the other soloists have yet to be identified (and may stay that way unless somebody posts who has the cut).

The tune is available on several different CDs..at least one anthology, and the original album. Depending on what you want out of the rest of the music, both would make for good buys, I think you "win" either way. So stay tuned!

9. Ray and Aretha--I had never heard this before.

If you're old enough (and I think you might be?), you'll remember how Coca-Cola had an ongoing series of these type things with all kinds of pop/rock/R&B acts. Well, somebody went and compiled them (all of them?) and either offered them for sale as a bootleg, or just went straight to the internet and blogged the compilation. There were a lot of these suckers, actually, and although it's a bit much to listen to all in one sitting, the "smaller doses" in which it proves to be fun are larger than you might expect!

10. Gene Ammons. I have this on a collection of early Chess recordings by Jug and Sonny Stitt, which is one of my favorite albums.

I think we have the same album, "Jug And Sonny", right? My version had the drum/bass intro chopped off, but I found this complete version. Either way, yeah, stuff like this is both easy and rewarding to listen to, straight to the heart, no tricks, no gimmicks, no games, just soul. Can't beat that!

11. This is either an early jazz rock fusion experiment, or someone recent who is trying to play in that style. It has a more recent sound to me somehow. I do not recognize the players. There is a body of early jazz rock fusion that sounds like this, risk taking, not jelling completely, but exciting, with the players going for broke and seeming not to care if it totally works.

It is early, and the only player whose name you be likely to recognize today is the guitarist's, and this is a very early recording of his. And yes, I agree 100% with your assessment of the "spirit" here, it's all kind of stoned/loopy, and maybe even naive, but you can just feel the fun that everybody's having doing this type of thing while it's still fresh and kinda risky, without a whole lot to go by as far as how it is "supposed" to sound. That kind of fun, the kind that you just sorta walk into, you start playing with it and it starts playing back and before you know it WHEEEE!!!! is all too rare in music, or even in life!

12. This singer sounds somewhat like Dinah Washington but is not Dinah. A very Duke Ellington jungle band style trombone sound. I do not know who this is.

The singer has been identified (and you're not alone in hearing the resemblance to Dinah), but unless somebody has a discography hand, the trombonist may remain anonymous.

And I'd like to again remind everybody that there is a very basic connection between this cut and the one right before it. Figure out what that connection is, and the identity of Track 11 will be a lot easier to get!

13. I found this to be quite humorous. It reminds me of the box set I have, "The Beat Generation". I do not know who is talking.

41ezsjsobgL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

I found it quite humorous as well, but not mockingly so...just a little goofy in a harmless way. Our speaker has been previously identified, and said a lot of things like this (as well as facilitating several decades of sincere, quality music). I think he had the ability to laugh at himself, so...it's all good Stan, it's all good.

14. I like the tenor sax player but cannot identify him.

Previously identified, and the tenor player is somebody who is more worthy of a carefulreexamination as a "serious" player than he has perhaps gotten to this point. (i.e. - you gotta be careful what you listen to, but the good/great stuff is there to be had)

This was a very appealing, very interesting Blindfold Test. Songs 4, 8 and 11 will have to be added to my collection if I do not already have them! It would be common for me to own them and not remember.

Thank you for the kind words. Your participation and thoughtful commentary is much appreciated. Plus, the ability to identify the group who did Track 7 is a total gas. Did NOT see that one coming! :tup:tup:tup:tup:tup

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My guesses and comments:

1. I hear Jon Hendricks very clearly. It is not Lambert and Ross with him. I am not familiar with this song.

Jim R identified the source, it's a jingle for a Mazola TV ad. The other singers may well be wife Judith and/or daughter Michelle, since they were touring together around the same time this jingle was on the air.

2. This female vocalist has a beautiful quality to her voice. I really like her singing. The soprano sax player is playing the kind of solo that almost all soprano sax players played in the 1970s. I used to think of it as "Coltrane-lite", influenced by Coltrane but without his overwhelming intensity of spirit. Someone like Joe Farrell would have played a soprano sax solo like this in the 1970s. I think this was recorded long after Joe's passing though.

Glad you like the this one. Recorded in 2003. The sopranoist is active on today's scene, better know as a tenor player. His core style is the same when playing jazz as it is here. As Jeff Crompton noted, there's no compromise of musicality, no "playing down" to the material. That's a constant in this singer's work, also.

3. Marlena Shaw from her "Who Is This Bitch Anyway" 1970s Blue Note album. I saw her live in a 1970s fusion all stars concert about five years ago. She was goofing around onstage too much, not singing enough.

That's too bad (about her live performance, not about your guess, which is spot on!). She's made some really good records (including this one). She's got a fine voice and can do the "attitude" thing really well, but when attitude turns into schtick...unfortunate.

4. I really like the guitar and saxophone solos, and have no idea who it is. I want to know! This is an album I would go out and buy. Now watch, I already own it.

You might! Once again, these are all well known players, especially the leader. But this might not be one of his better-known (or typical) albums.

5. I do not know who is doing this comedy bit. It reminds me of Second City.

Previously identified as The National Lampoon Radio Hour, very early 1970s, but there might have been some cross-polination between them and Second City. I don't know. But it wouldn't surprise me.

Some quick Googling does reveal some common members between Second City and National Lampoon.

6. Nat King Cole with a swanky big band. I really like this, and do not have it.

I don't know that it's commonly available on any anthologies or anything, more of a "deep" album cut, and on an album (that has seen CD reissue) that had no real hits on it (in its original form, not sure about any reissue-added bonus cuts). But still, tasty!

7. Clara Hill singing with Jazzanova, the song "That Night".

WHOA! Was laying 60-40 odds that this one went unidentified altogether, but ding goes the bell here! Wrong singer, but right band and right song. Do you follow Jazzanova much? I find that when I like them, I really like them, and it's the same when I don't like them. And this is one of the ones I really like.

8. Is this Willie Bobo? I absolutely love this track. If I don't already own it, I will for sure get it after it is identified. This is exactly why I participate in the Blindfold Tests, to discover great songs like this!!!!!!

Always good to see extra-large fonts in the service of the conveyance of pleasure instead of anger! :g

And yes, it is Willie Bobo. The trumpet soloist has been identified as Jimmy Owens, but the other soloists have yet to be identified (and may stay that way unless somebody posts who has the cut).

The tune is available on several different CDs..at least one anthology, and the original album. Depending on what you want out of the rest of the music, both would make for good buys, I think you "win" either way. So stay tuned!

9. Ray and Aretha--I had never heard this before.

If you're old enough (and I think you might be?), you'll remember how Coca-Cola had an ongoing series of these type things with all kinds of pop/rock/R&B acts. Well, somebody went and compiled them (all of them?) and either offered them for sale as a bootleg, or just went straight to the internet and blogged the compilation. There were a lot of these suckers, actually, and although it's a bit much to listen to all in one sitting, the "smaller doses" in which it proves to be fun are larger than you might expect!

10. Gene Ammons. I have this on a collection of early Chess recordings by Jug and Sonny Stitt, which is one of my favorite albums.

I think we have the same album, "Jug And Sonny", right? My version had the drum/bass intro chopped off, but I found this complete version. Either way, yeah, stuff like this is both easy and rewarding to listen to, straight to the heart, no tricks, no gimmicks, no games, just soul. Can't beat that!

Yes, I have it on "Jug and Sonny". I overheard it at the late lamented Kansas City mega-used music-store, the Music Exchange, and bought it on the spot, years ago.

11. This is either an early jazz rock fusion experiment, or someone recent who is trying to play in that style. It has a more recent sound to me somehow. I do not recognize the players. There is a body of early jazz rock fusion that sounds like this, risk taking, not jelling completely, but exciting, with the players going for broke and seeming not to care if it totally works.

It is early, and the only player whose name you be likely to recognize today is the guitarist's, and this is a very early recording of his. And yes, I agree 100% with your assessment of the "spirit" here, it's all kind of stoned/loopy, and maybe even naive, but you can just feel the fun that everybody's having doing this type of thing while it's still fresh and kinda risky, without a whole lot to go by as far as how it is "supposed" to sound. That kind of fun, the kind that you just sorta walk into, you start playing with it and it starts playing back and before you know it WHEEEE!!!! is all too rare in music, or even in life!

12. This singer sounds somewhat like Dinah Washington but is not Dinah. A very Duke Ellington jungle band style trombone sound. I do not know who this is.

The singer has been identified (and you're not alone in hearing the resemblance to Dinah), but unless somebody has a discography hand, the trombonist may remain anonymous.

And I'd like to again remind everybody that there is a very basic connection between this cut and the one right before it. Figure out what that connection is, and the identity of Track 11 will be a lot easier to get!

13. I found this to be quite humorous. It reminds me of the box set I have, "The Beat Generation". I do not know who is talking.

41ezsjsobgL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

I found it quite humorous as well, but not mockingly so...just a little goofy in a harmless way. Our speaker has been previously identified, and said a lot of things like this (as well as facilitating several decades of sincere, quality music). I think he had the ability to laugh at himself, so...it's all good Stan, it's all good.

14. I like the tenor sax player but cannot identify him.

Previously identified, and the tenor player is somebody who is more worthy of a carefulreexamination as a "serious" player than he has perhaps gotten to this point. (i.e. - you gotta be careful what you listen to, but the good/great stuff is there to be had)

I have gone back and read the comments by others and see that this is Les "Sad Ass Town" McCann and Eddie Harris. Let me explain. About five years ago, Javon Jackson was the leader of a group at the Rhythm and Ribs outdoor music festival at 18th and Vine in Kansas City, Missouri. In the middle of the set, he brought out Les McCann as a special guest artist. Les came to the microphone and announced in quite a grouchy voice that Kansas City was a sad ass town, before beginning to play.

This was a very appealing, very interesting Blindfold Test. Songs 4, 8 and 11 will have to be added to my collection if I do not already have them! It would be common for me to own them and not remember.

Thank you for the kind words. Your participation and thoughtful commentary is much appreciated. Plus, the ability to identify the group who did Track 7 is a total gas. Did NOT see that one coming! :tup:tup:tup:tup:tup

There was an excellent used music store in Kansas City for many years, Recycled Sounds, owned by Ann Winter, which I frequented. Ann was interested in, for lack of a better term, European electronica artists who were involved in jazz, and urged me to listen to things she would play for me. This took place in the late 1990s and early 2000s. I included another of her suggestions in this genre, Flanger, on my first ever Blindfold Test.

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Les McCann has never been known for his diplomacy, I'll put it that way. :g

Jazzanova is part of a genre that used to be called "nu-jazz". Don't know if it still is or not, but I've found there to be a decent amount of music under that general umbrella that I like for several reasons, not least of which is that the people involved have no hangups about what it means to "be" any one genre, like this one. It's a "spiritual jazz" groove in every way, but it's presented with the vibe of pop/dance music, and it works as an either/or/both type thing.

I find the notion that people would think like that refreshing, and that they can actually pull it off invigorating. Of course, there's a lot of fluff in that field, a lot of silly/superficial nothingness, but that's true of all musics, really. And Jazzanova in particular has been one of the groups who for my tastes hits more than they miss. Just a ...different flavor to add to the pallate, ya' know?

Anyway, sorry about Les McCann. I get the impression that sometimes he's like Lou Donaldson only without the filters. :alien::alien::alien:

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Les McCann has never been known for his diplomacy, I'll put it that way. :g

Jazzanova is part of a genre that used to be called "nu-jazz". Don't know if it still is or not, but I've found there to be a decent amount of music under that general umbrella that I like for several reasons, not least of which is that the people involved have no hangups about what it means to "be" any one genre, like this one. It's a "spiritual jazz" groove in every way, but it's presented with the vibe of pop/dance music, and it works as an either/or/both type thing.

I find the notion that people would think like that refreshing, and that they can actually pull it off invigorating. Of course, there's a lot of fluff in that field, a lot of silly/superficial nothingness, but that's true of all musics, really. And Jazzanova in particular has been one of the groups who for my tastes hits more than they miss. Just a ...different flavor to add to the pallate, ya' know?

Anyway, sorry about Les McCann. I get the impression that sometimes he's like Lou Donaldson only without the filters. :alien::alien::alien:

Yes, there was a divider in the CD racks at Ann Winter's store that had the word NU on it.

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Wow! Not what I was anticipating when I saw who made this test up! I'm not even certain why, probably because I typically identify most with your commentary on these. There wasn't a lot of familiar ground here for me, but I gave what thoughts I could.

1 - Sounds a bit like Jon Hendricks doing a commercial. Be that correct?

2 - Not sure how I feel about this. Reminds me of Stevie Wonder's TALKING BOOK in terms of the music. The vocals are a style that doesn't usually speak to me (that arranged vocal sound made popular by groups like The Manhattan Transfer). Not really feeling the post-Coltrane soprano. Obviously a good player, but this isn't doing a helluva lot for me. I'm not hearing a lot of originality -- someone out of that Liebman school (or the man himself), I'm guessing.

3 - This has the sound of The Crusaders in the beginning. Reminiscent of Soul Shadows and/or Better Not Look Down. It's not that, though. Tune sure sounds a lot like Stevie's I Was Made To Love Her.

4 - This speaks more to me than the other stuff. Has that Cosby/junkyard sound. Bari tone reminds me of Ronnie Ross.

5 - Funny, I was going to say it sounded like somebody wearing black face trying to sound like a black performer of the period.

6 - Sounds a bit like Nat King Cole, but nowhere near as polished. I like it. Nice, easy, laid-back swing to it.

7 - This is lots of things I like. The percussion reminds me of Hum-Allah, Hum-Allah, Hum-Allah. The vocals have that nice, 70's throwback harmony. Rhodes, hell, I'm in.

8 - Trippy latin feel. Seemingly not someone I know. The feel reminds me of Bobbi Humphrey, but it's not her. It definitely seems to be someone more out of that hardcore Latin genre. Loving that nasty tenor, a lot. Sounds like it could be Stubblefield. Is this a Jerry Gonzalez project? Huh... now it sounds like an angry Hank Mobley... I don't think it's Stub, but I love it anyway.

9 - Hmmm. Ray Charles and Aretha Franklin? :D Is this one of those awful, done after they're dead, things like Starbuck's did with Basie and Ray? It's neat at first, but the notion disturbs me. Or it i just a commercial?

10 - Sure sounds like Jug to me. But the lines sound like Lester Young. That's two names I would never think I would put together. It's not Quinichette, the tone is too clean. I'm positive I have this. I should be able to nail the tune, but I suck.

11 - Egad. There is much I don't love about this. It's like someone trying to do Stevie Wonder as children's music. Not diggin' it at all. Didn't make it to 6 minutes, sorry.

12 - Lazy Bones. Somewhat familiar vocalist, but can't name her. I like the doo-wop voices mixing with the muted 'bone -- cool effect.

13 - Kenton, Artistry in Rhythm. No idea what the recording is, but it is NOT Live at the Tropicana.

14 - Some Shades of Eddie Harris in there. I can't tell if it's Eddie or not. Just as I'm about to commit, he convinces me not to, but I think it is. I like it in a guilty sort of way. The same way I get into Lenny Pickett on SNL, or John Wayne movies. Don't know the tune, but I assume it's a pop vocal from the way in which he's sort of speaking the words.

Thanks for the unanticipated non-standard BFT!

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Wow! Not what I was anticipating when I saw who made this test up! I'm not even certain why, probably because I typically identify most with your commentary on these. There wasn't a lot of familiar ground here for me, but I gave what thoughts I could.

I warned everybody in the signup thread! :g

1 - Sounds a bit like Jon Hendricks doing a commercial. Be that correct?

Yep. For Mazola cooking oil. No cholesterol at all!

2 - Not sure how I feel about this. Reminds me of Stevie Wonder's TALKING BOOK in terms of the music. The vocals are a style that doesn't usually speak to me (that arranged vocal sound made popular by groups like The Manhattan Transfer). Not really feeling the post-Coltrane soprano. Obviously a good player, but this isn't doing a helluva lot for me. I'm not hearing a lot of originality -- someone out of that Liebman school (or the man himself), I'm guessing.

Not Liebman, or of that generation. I find the originality to be in the organization of the solo, the motivic organization within the regularly occurring up-and-down arcs. Sort of like if Wayne Shorter mind-melded with Coleman Hawkins. It's also kind of squirrelly in that regard, so I can understand where you're coming from.

3 - This has the sound of The Crusaders in the beginning. Reminiscent of Soul Shadows and/or Better Not Look Down. It's not that, though. Tune sure sounds a lot like Stevie's I Was Made To Love Her.

I was waiting for somebody to hear that similarity! And given the songwriter, I'm pretty sure that the reference was both intentional and knowing. Yeah, yea-ah, YE-HEH.

4 - This speaks more to me than the other stuff. Has that Cosby/junkyard sound. Bari tone reminds me of Ronnie Ross.

A surprise awaits you, too!

5 - Funny, I was going to say it sounded like somebody wearing black face trying to sound like a black performer of the period.

Well, it is black comedy...

6 - Sounds a bit like Nat King Cole, but nowhere near as polished. I like it. Nice, easy, laid-back swing to it.

It is Nat, and yeah, that swing conquers all!

7 - This is lots of things I like. The percussion reminds me of Hum-Allah, Hum-Allah, Hum-Allah. The vocals have that nice, 70's throwback harmony. Rhodes, hell, I'm in.

You and me both. Band & song both ID'ed by Hot Ptah. Singer might remain unidentified until the reveal...we'll see.

8 - Trippy latin feel. Seemingly not someone I know. The feel reminds me of Bobbi Humphrey, but it's not her. It definitely seems to be someone more out of that hardcore Latin genre. Loving that nasty tenor, a lot. Sounds like it could be Stubblefield. Is this a Jerry Gonzalez project? Huh... now it sounds like an angry Hank Mobley... I don't think it's Stub, but I love it anyway.

You hear the Mobley-isms too, eh? Not Stub, not Gonzalez, leader already ID'ed, tenor player may or may not be somebody with a direct Mobley connection. Don't know for sure.

9 - Hmmm. Ray Charles and Aretha Franklin? :D Is this one of those awful, done after they're dead, things like Starbuck's did with Basie and Ray? It's neat at first, but the notion disturbs me. Or it i just a commercial?

Real commercial, late 1960s, early 1970s.

And if you're disturbed, let Ray pour you a Coke and y'all can talk it over. :g

10 - Sure sounds like Jug to me. But the lines sound like Lester Young. That's two names I would never think I would put together. It's not Quinichette, the tone is too clean. I'm positive I have this. I should be able to nail the tune, but I suck.

It is Jug, and yes, his early-ish vocabulary was as indebted to Pres as his tone wasn't, so you got it right. The tune is "You're Not The Kind".

11 - Egad. There is much I don't love about this. It's like someone trying to do Stevie Wonder as children's music. Not diggin' it at all. Didn't make it to 6 minutes, sorry.

Children's music, eh? You're on to something here...

12 - Lazy Bones. Somewhat familiar vocalist, but can't name her. I like the doo-wop voices mixing with the muted 'bone -- cool effect.

I don't have personnel for this one, but it was recorded for RCA, which at the was also the home of The Statesmen Quartet and, I think, The Blackwood Brothers. So I wonder...that bass voice is just marvelous, no matter who it is.

And again, there is a direct connection with this tune and the one before it...

13 - Kenton, Artistry in Rhythm. No idea what the recording is, but it is NOT Live at the Tropicana.

No, it's not. Nor is it from a Rotary Club meeting, although it sounds like it might be... :cool:

14 - Some Shades of Eddie Harris in there. I can't tell if it's Eddie or not. Just as I'm about to commit, he convinces me not to, but I think it is. I like it in a guilty sort of way. The same way I get into Lenny Pickett on SNL, or John Wayne movies. Don't know the tune, but I assume it's a pop vocal from the way in which he's sort of speaking the words.

It is Eddie, the whole shebang previously identified. And nothing to feel guilty about imo, it's damn good, soulful tenor playing. No words that I know of, but I share your feeling that he's "speaking the words" anyway. That vocal quality is a hallmark of his, one likely reason why he sold so many records. On a tempo like this, there's no room for error, and he does better than just not making any. He owns it!

Thanks for the unanticipated non-standard BFT!

Hey, you got in some good guesses and some good observations. I appreciate both. Thanks for participating!

Edited by JSngry

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11 - Egad. There is much I don't love about this. It's like someone trying to do Stevie Wonder as children's music. Not diggin' it at all. Didn't make it to 6 minutes, sorry.

Children's music, eh? You're on to something here...

Is that because the song is from this album?

220200879590.jpg

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Why yes, it is!

Hot Ptah is going deep on the obscurities! :tup:tup:tup:tup:tup

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Ha, do I hear Eddie Harris on the final track?

He's amazing, his tone is just so unique, you don't need more than a few seconds to pin him down!

Haven't yet read anything in this thread, I guess three pages in he's long been identified by others ... but hell that's a great closer there!

Will try and give further listens (just finishing my first) and post some comments and impressions within the next few days - first listen was fun though, thanks!

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So far, a perfect score! :g

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1. A bopmercial! Is that the real Jon Hendricks? I can't quite make out the words – are they praising cholesterol? What doesn't kill ya...

2. I feel guilty about not liking this more than I do. I'll admit to being tired of neo-soul. The melody is beautiful and well-sung, but the why-doesn't-everybody-listen-to-my-wisdom part of the lyric bugs me. Maybe I'm the curmudgeon who grumbles, "You kids act like you invented this stuff!" In the Glass-Half-Full Division, the soprano sax is pretty good, and the player really does something with the cadenza at the end. My favorite thing about this track is the acoustic guitar – wonderful comping and imaginative fills.

3. This feels more like circa-1972 soul and less like a re-creation. If it's a re-creation, they got the sound and technology right. Another superb piece of singing. Love the Moog.

4. Another pet peeve is playing "Manteca" riffs without actually playing "Manteca." There's a local band that has a "Manteca" chart that uses blues changes for blowing instead of the real changes, and I usually find an excuse to leave when they're playing it. Solos here don't do much for me either.

5. I sure hope it's a put-on, 'cause that's the only way I can take it.

6. Is that Nat or Freddy? The precision and dynamic control in the band are amazing – a nearly-lost art of playing dynamics there. The strings work. Can't imagine this being any better than it is.

7. How many Fender Rhodeses on this track, and what's the plural of Rhodes? Again, feels a lot like circa-'72 and not so much like a re-creation. But something I can't put my finger on makes me think it's neo.

8. Sounds like an old Mongo record, or a better Herbie Mann record. That's about an 11-bar blues, isn't it? I like. The tenor solo is above and beyond the call of duty. The relaxed trumpet is nice.

9. Our first sponsored BFT? Ray plays it fairly straight and lets the Nat Cole influence show a little.

10. The song is "You're Not the Kind." At first the tenor sounds like Quinichette, but the attack is harder, like someone poised between Prez and Gene Ammons. I can listen to this kind of stuff all day.

11. That's electronically fuzzed-up vibes, isn't it? Is this a Gary Burton record? The tune is, er, quaint. The guitar solo needs some rests – Larry Coryell?

12. Is the singer Dinah or somebody deeply influenced by her? Lavern Baker, or somebody I haven't heard of? She makes an effective little drama out of the song. Several worlds colliding here, with the doo-wah chorus (they don't really do any damage), the T-Bone Walker like guitar (a treat) and the good plunger trombone.

13. Right message, but probably the wrong messenger. And "Artistry in Rhythm" is always such a grimace of a tune.

14. I'll admit I don't recognize the tune or the player. But I wish I'd been in the room when it was played.

This is one of those BFTs that keep poking at my brain long after I play it. The answers are gonna be interesting. Thanks very much, Jim!

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1. A bopmercial! Is that the real Jon Hendricks? I can't quite make out the words – are they praising cholesterol? What doesn't kill ya...

It is Hendricks, praising Mazola Oil.

2. I feel guilty about not liking this more than I do. I'll admit to being tired of neo-soul. The melody is beautiful and well-sung, but the why-doesn't-everybody-listen-to-my-wisdom part of the lyric bugs me. Maybe I'm the curmudgeon who grumbles, "You kids act like you invented this stuff!" In the Glass-Half-Full Division, the soprano sax is pretty good, and the player really does something with the cadenza at the end. My favorite thing about this track is the acoustic guitar – wonderful comping and imaginative fills.

The whole backing track is full of subtle niceties, including the acoustic guitar, yes.

3. This feels more like circa-1972 soul and less like a re-creation. If it's a re-creation, they got the sound and technology right. Another superb piece of singing. Love the Moog.

Not a recreation at all. And it's on Blue Note!

4. Another pet peeve is playing "Manteca" riffs without actually playing "Manteca." There's a local band that has a "Manteca" chart that uses blues changes for blowing instead of the real changes, and I usually find an excuse to leave when they're playing it. Solos here don't do much for me either.

It sounds like an in-studio head jam to me. The rest of the album is more arranged by a significant degree.

5. I sure hope it's a put-on, 'cause that's the only way I can take it.

BIG put on!

6. Is that Nat or Freddy? The precision and dynamic control in the band are amazing – a nearly-lost art of playing dynamics there. The strings work. Can't imagine this being any better than it is.

Yes, that's Nat, and yes the orchestra is amazing, and amazingly recorded.

7. How many Fender Rhodeses on this track, and what's the plural of Rhodes? Again, feels a lot like circa-'72 and not so much like a re-creation. But something I can't put my finger on makes me think it's neo.

It is neo. But it does cop the feel, imo.

8. Sounds like an old Mongo record, or a better Herbie Mann record. That's about an 11-bar blues, isn't it? I like. The tenor solo is above and beyond the call of duty. The relaxed trumpet is nice.

Neither Mongo nor Mann, and I agree about the tenor solo, very invigorating.

9. Our first sponsored BFT? Ray plays it fairly straight and lets the Nat Cole influence show a little.

Things go better with money in the pocket!

10. The song is "You're Not the Kind." At first the tenor sounds like Quinichette, but the attack is harder, like someone poised between Prez and Gene Ammons. I can listen to this kind of stuff all day.

Right song, and right tenor w/Jug.

11. That's electronically fuzzed-up vibes, isn't it? Is this a Gary Burton record? The tune is, er, quaint. The guitar solo needs some rests – Larry Coryell?

Neither Burton nor Coryell, yes, quaint indeed. Hot Ptah ID'd the album and the group. Youthful is what it all is.

12. Is the singer Dinah or somebody deeply influenced by her? Lavern Baker, or somebody I haven't heard of? She makes an effective little drama out of the song. Several worlds colliding here, with the doo-wah chorus (they don't really do any damage), the T-Bone Walker like guitar (a treat) and the good plunger trombone.

Pretty sure you've heard of her, but may haven't paid a lot of attention to her (guilty here too on that one). Already ID'ed as Kay Starr. Still not sure if it's a doo-wop group or a moonlighting Gospel group on the backing vocals...

13. Right message, but probably the wrong messenger. And "Artistry in Rhythm" is always such a grimace of a tune.

But...SINCERE! :D

14. I'll admit I don't recognize the tune or the player. But I wish I'd been in the room when it was played.

Thanks to the miracle of modern technology, you can be in the room any time now and her it being played, even if the room and the people no longer exist. This Modern World!

This is one of those BFTs that keep poking at my brain long after I play it. The answers are gonna be interesting. Thanks very much, Jim!

Thanks for your participation and feedback. Here's hoping that the poking doesn't become too aggressive and breaks something!

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Will try to get the answers up this weekend. Almost everything's been at least partially identified.

Almost...

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Will try to get the answers up this weekend. Almost everything's been at least partially identified.

Almost...

But not #4, which I am very curious about. I keep listening to the guitar and saxophone solos and sometimes think I hear identifying licks. I should be able to identify this one but cannot so far. I really like it a lot, too.

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Ok, I'll give a semi-hint on #4 - it's not a New York based date.

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Ok, I'll give a semi-hint on #4 - it's not a New York based date.

Is #4 recorded in California, as the final track, the blowing track, on an otherwise much-arranged CTI album?

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Recorded in California, yes. Otherwise much-arranged? More or less, yes (there are arrangements, and they are pretty specific, but there's plenty of blowing as well, and the groups are of varying sizes).

But CTI? No.

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