mjzee

BFT 159 Announcement and Discussion

32 posts in this topic

Just wanted to let y'all know that BFT 159 is charging down the pike and will soon be sitting in your laps.  16 tracks, about 80 minutes.  Reflects my mainstream tastes, but hopefully will be throwing you for a tasty loop every now and then.  Please look for it around June 1.

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#6 has a George Adams solo which I think is great. I have this album and have played it often. It is on the tip of my brain. I hope I positively identify it before I go mad trying. 

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1 hour ago, Hot Ptah said:

#6 has a George Adams solo which I think is great. I have this album and have played it often. It is on the tip of my brain. I hope I positively identify it before I go mad trying. 

You'll get it.  Very memorable album.  George Adams was not the leader (but hard to say who was).

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Is Track 6 from the Amacord Nino Rota album, Track 9 on that album, the medley of several songs starting with The White Sheik?

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1 hour ago, Hot Ptah said:

Is Track 6 from the Amacord Nino Rota album, Track 9 on that album, the medley of several songs starting with The White Sheik?

That's it!  Great band: William Fischer, arr, cond; Wynton Marsalis, tp; George Adams, ts; Branford Marsalis, woodwinds; Kenny Barron, p; Ron Carter, b; Wilbert Fletcher, d.  The first of the Hal Willner-produced "theme" albums.

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1 hour ago, mjzee said:

That's it!  Great band: William Fischer, arr, cond; Wynton Marsalis, tp; George Adams, ts; Branford Marsalis, woodwinds; Kenny Barron, p; Ron Carter, b; Wilbert Fletcher, d.  The first of the Hal Willner-produced "theme" albums.

Now I know why I know this track so well. I included it on my BFT #94. However, I did not remember that for quite a while after listening to your BFT. It is a great track.

i miss George Adams.

i saw him live several times and he was always so great. He played with a passion, an immediacy that seems to be not as common in jazz today.

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very enjoyable selection. i'm new to this so please let me know if i'm breaking any rules. 

1. i'm already out of my league. paul whiteman? very nice saxophone writing and well-recorded. no clue.

3. and no clue again. is that mingus on bass? jerome richardson on flute?

4. this is easier. very enjoyable to compare the two styles. great guitar playing too. 

5. in a sentimental mood. very good singer. don't really like the tinny rhythm guitar.

7. very carribean. guitarist enjoys his chops. gotta be E.R.?

12. stardust. lionel hampton. great trombone. pre-bop alto. clark terry. hawk!


15. in a little spanish town. that was so wierd i had to google it. not sonny criss as i had thought. now it does make a little more sense. 

must listen and think more about the other selections. thank you!

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Glad you're enjoying it!

1: Not Paul Whiteman.

3: Not Mingus, not Richardson.

7: If E.R. is Ernest Ranglin, you are correct!  He is not the leader (perhaps co-leader).

12.  Wow, you nailed that - I thought it would be one of the more obscure selections.

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1 hour ago, mjzee said:

Glad you're enjoying it!

1: Not Paul Whiteman.

3: Not Mingus, not Richardson.

7: If E.R. is Ernest Ranglin, you are correct!  He is not the leader (perhaps co-leader).

12.  Wow, you nailed that - I thought it would be one of the more obscure selections.

yes, ranglin. quite unique voice. i wasn't sureabout the protocol regarding names. is 12 some jatp recording? j j johnson on trombone?

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4 hours ago, hgweber said:

yes, ranglin. quite unique voice. i wasn't sureabout the protocol regarding names. is 12 some jatp recording? j j johnson on trombone?

Naming names is fine.  It is J.J. on trombone.  The Hampton track is not JATP; it's something I discovered recently.  There are other amazing names on the track, so I'll see if others (or you) can identify them before I reveal.  Ranglin really is an unsung hero.  He's a little like Zelig - he pops up in unexpected places.

Edited by mjzee

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#1--my guess would be Ellington from early 30's.  If so (and I'm not confident), it's not one of his more memorable pieces. 

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1 hour ago, Milestones said:

#1--my guess would be Ellington from early 30's.  If so (and I'm not confident), it's not one of his more memorable pieces. 

Not Ellington, but a similar vintage.

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#2 sounds Monk-like, but also sounds like a standard.  I'm certain it is not Monk.  Steve Lacy on soprano?  

#3 has to be a session led by a flute player.  Bobby Jasper?  Herbie Mann?

I'm feeling this is going to be a tough blindfold test. 

#8--Oliver Lake on alto?  James Spaulding?

#9 is "Mighty Fine" by Joey Baron with Arthur Blythe, Bill Frisell, and Ron Carter. 

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#10 might be Lee Morgan?  It is certainly has the Blue Note sound written all over it, whether or not it is from that label. 

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3 hours ago, Milestones said:

#2 sounds Monk-like, but also sounds like a standard.  I'm certain it is not Monk.  Steve Lacy on soprano?  

#3 has to be a session led by a flute player.  Bobby Jasper?  Herbie Mann?

I'm feeling this is going to be a tough blindfold test. 

#8--Oliver Lake on alto?  James Spaulding?

#9 is "Mighty Fine" by Joey Baron with Arthur Blythe, Bill Frisell, and Ron Carter. 

#2 is a standard.  Not Lacy.

#3 IS led by Herbie Mann.  Congratulations!

#8 is not Lake nor Spaulding.  Much more recent vintage.

#9: Correct!  A lot of love shown here recently on Blythe's passing, and I wanted to showcase his gutbucket side.

3 hours ago, Milestones said:

#10 might be Lee Morgan?  It is certainly has the Blue Note sound written all over it, whether or not it is from that label. 

#10 is not Morgan.  The answer might surprise you, as might the leader (who is not the trumpeter).

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No. 1 is the Noble Sissle band (he and Eubie Blake are the song's co-composers) with lovely Bechet on clarinet. I guessed right off that it was from 1932 or so because of the time feel, but it's 1937. None of the rest have rung a bell so far, but I'll try again. Agree that there's something Monkish about #2, albeit in a kind of pop-jazz vein. Clare Fischer? Drums sound rather clunky there.  I know who the singer on #5 is but just can't bring her name to mind.

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Track 01 - I'm just wild about Harry.  I forget what movie this was in, but I'm always taken to that when I hear it.  Good to hear a bouncy bari from that period.  I have this.  Oh!  It's Sidney Bechet, for sure.  I've got it on one of those compilations.  No mistaking that vibrato.  At 3 minutes, seems like it must be later.

Track 02 - Not sure who this is.  Reminds me somewhat of Jimmy Vass, but a bit busier.  I like this a lot; seems to have a strong nod to Monk without being Monk.

Track 03 - Ooooo... me likey.  The Mooch, I believe.  Tasty, more modern take on an old song.  I suck at IDing flutists.

Track 04 - Happy.  I like this.  Double bass as leads... I like this.  I can think of a few guys who would try this, and this doesn't sound like any of them, to me.  Looking forward to this reveal.  If it's a whole album of this, I have to have it.

Track 05 - In a Sentimental Mood by a seemingly 70s vocalist.  Very few songs exist that are so bullet proof that it's ridiculously difficult to find a bad version.  This is one of them.  I've literally never heard this song when it didn't "work".  All hail Duke!  There's something in this woman's voice, the dynamics, that is reminiscent of Dionne Warwick, but not her.  

Track 06 - BIG sound.  My first thought was Harold Vick, but this guy is beefier, a little more to the point.  Different arrangement.  Different enough that I can almost forgive the electric bass.  Is that a clue?  Open chords are reminiscent of Harold Mabern, but I don't think it's him.  What's going on with that trumpet?  Is that EVI?  I like the arrangement, but the hyper compressed drums are off-putting.  I'm guessing early 80s.  Tenor is George Adams.  Is this something with Gil Evans?  Hehe... I love George... friggin' nut.  Soprano sounds familiar, but I can't put a finger on him.

Track 07 - Seems like I should know the song, but I don't.  I think I like it, but can't make up my mind.  It's like if Scofield did a record with Jimmy Buffett.  It's a hot day... beverage in hand... ocean... yeah, I could definitely dig this... but I'm at work.  Feh.

Track 08 - I like this, even though it's a little post-modern Jazz.  Sounds like somebody heavily influenced by Dave Holland.  Could be Dave Douglas.  I really like the bassist on this, almost wondering if it could be DH, but something about the piano is too flowery for one of his projects.  Definitely a Potter influence on the alto player.  At times he's reminiscent of Gary Bartz (good), but other times gets to mathematical for my tastes.  Overall, this works.  I'm going to guess a European group.  Reminds me of Martina Almgren's group.  Not David.  Closer to Avishai Cohen, but not flashy enough.  This is a niche within the Jazz array that rarely matches my ears, but some of it works very well.  This falls into that category.  The longer it's gone on, the more it's growing on me.  Has a very optimistic overtone, almost like them music.  I used to use a Bob Berg cut to close out my radio show in college that had a similar feel (American Gothic from Back Roads).

Track 09 - Ah!  A Mighty Fine track from this.  Arthur was the Arthuriest.  A part of my always kind of turns away when I see Frisell's name, but then when I hear it, I always seem to end up with a smile.  I'll blame my Dad's influence. ;)  Ron Carter managed to do this feel about as well as anybody (Uptown Conversation, anybody?).  

**Track 10 - Whoooo!  Aggressive, funky-@$$ tenor!  Almost a Turrentine level of Boss... sounds a lot like Willis Jackson, but I can't see him doing anything this Messengerish in feel. 

Track 11 - This one is weird.  I think I like where they are headed, but that bass (direct bass?) is frustrating hell out of me.  Sounds like the tenor is trying to do his Buddy Tate, but it falls just short.  It's definitely a real guy, though.  Seems like maybe somebody not really noted for this type of playing and he's *really* trying to put it out there.  Because it's a blindfold test and a bunch of names are floating into my mind for the pianist, I'll risk it and ask:  Gene Harris?

Track 12 - A thoughtful take on Stardust.  One of the advantages of age is I've gained an appreciation for the trombone.  Seems obvious to say J.J., but it has to be.  Hmmm... nice, thoughtful, warm soprano.  Warm soprano, needle drop, gotta be Lucky.  Muted trumpet is very enjoyable, I'm thinking I've got this -- I'll say Clark Terry.  That sure sounds like Hawk.  Just for fun, I'll say Lionel Hampton ;).  I have it as this.  Man... great just doesn't age.

Track 13 - Sounds Bill Evans-ish to me, but I have no idea what I'm listening to.  Grooving along with it, though.

Track 14 - Sounds like a lullaby.  Which and by whom, no idea.

Track 15 - What's going on here?  Old recording played over by a highly accomplished modern player out of the Cannonball school.  Not Cannonball, but perhaps... well, piss... can't think of his name.  White guy who sounds EXACTLY like Cannonball (can actually fool me at times).  Frick.  [Later]  Still can't think of his damned name.  

Track 16 - No clue.  

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1 hour ago, Larry Kart said:

No. 1 is the Noble Sissle band (he and Eubie Blake are the song's co-composers) with lovely Bechet on clarinet. I guessed right off that it was from 1932 or so because of the time feel, but it's 1937. None of the rest have rung a bell so far, but I'll try again. Agree that there's something Monkish about #2, albeit in a kind of pop-jazz vein. Clare Fischer? Drums sound rather clunky there.  I know who the singer on #5 is but just can't bring her name to mind.

#1 is correct.

#2 is not Fischer.  It's interesting you guessed that, though, because he had many releases on the same label.

1 hour ago, tkeith said:

Track 01 - I'm just wild about Harry.  I forget what movie this was in, but I'm always taken to that when I hear it.  Good to hear a bouncy bari from that period.  I have this.  Oh!  It's Sidney Bechet, for sure.  I've got it on one of those compilations.  No mistaking that vibrato.  At 3 minutes, seems like it must be later.

Track 02 - Not sure who this is.  Reminds me somewhat of Jimmy Vass, but a bit busier.  I like this a lot; seems to have a strong nod to Monk without being Monk.

Track 03 - Ooooo... me likey.  The Mooch, I believe.  Tasty, more modern take on an old song.  I suck at IDing flutists.

Track 04 - Happy.  I like this.  Double bass as leads... I like this.  I can think of a few guys who would try this, and this doesn't sound like any of them, to me.  Looking forward to this reveal.  If it's a whole album of this, I have to have it.

Track 05 - In a Sentimental Mood by a seemingly 70s vocalist.  Very few songs exist that are so bullet proof that it's ridiculously difficult to find a bad version.  This is one of them.  I've literally never heard this song when it didn't "work".  All hail Duke!  There's something in this woman's voice, the dynamics, that is reminiscent of Dionne Warwick, but not her.  

Track 06 - BIG sound.  My first thought was Harold Vick, but this guy is beefier, a little more to the point.  Different arrangement.  Different enough that I can almost forgive the electric bass.  Is that a clue?  Open chords are reminiscent of Harold Mabern, but I don't think it's him.  What's going on with that trumpet?  Is that EVI?  I like the arrangement, but the hyper compressed drums are off-putting.  I'm guessing early 80s.  Tenor is George Adams.  Is this something with Gil Evans?  Hehe... I love George... friggin' nut.  Soprano sounds familiar, but I can't put a finger on him.

Track 07 - Seems like I should know the song, but I don't.  I think I like it, but can't make up my mind.  It's like if Scofield did a record with Jimmy Buffett.  It's a hot day... beverage in hand... ocean... yeah, I could definitely dig this... but I'm at work.  Feh.

Track 08 - I like this, even though it's a little post-modern Jazz.  Sounds like somebody heavily influenced by Dave Holland.  Could be Dave Douglas.  I really like the bassist on this, almost wondering if it could be DH, but something about the piano is too flowery for one of his projects.  Definitely a Potter influence on the alto player.  At times he's reminiscent of Gary Bartz (good), but other times gets to mathematical for my tastes.  Overall, this works.  I'm going to guess a European group.  Reminds me of Martina Almgren's group.  Not David.  Closer to Avishai Cohen, but not flashy enough.  This is a niche within the Jazz array that rarely matches my ears, but some of it works very well.  This falls into that category.  The longer it's gone on, the more it's growing on me.  Has a very optimistic overtone, almost like them music.  I used to use a Bob Berg cut to close out my radio show in college that had a similar feel (American Gothic from Back Roads).

Track 09 - Ah!  A Mighty Fine track from this.  Arthur was the Arthuriest.  A part of my always kind of turns away when I see Frisell's name, but then when I hear it, I always seem to end up with a smile.  I'll blame my Dad's influence. ;)  Ron Carter managed to do this feel about as well as anybody (Uptown Conversation, anybody?).  

**Track 10 - Whoooo!  Aggressive, funky-@$$ tenor!  Almost a Turrentine level of Boss... sounds a lot like Willis Jackson, but I can't see him doing anything this Messengerish in feel. 

Track 11 - This one is weird.  I think I like where they are headed, but that bass (direct bass?) is frustrating hell out of me.  Sounds like the tenor is trying to do his Buddy Tate, but it falls just short.  It's definitely a real guy, though.  Seems like maybe somebody not really noted for this type of playing and he's *really* trying to put it out there.  Because it's a blindfold test and a bunch of names are floating into my mind for the pianist, I'll risk it and ask:  Gene Harris?

Track 12 - A thoughtful take on Stardust.  One of the advantages of age is I've gained an appreciation for the trombone.  Seems obvious to say J.J., but it has to be.  Hmmm... nice, thoughtful, warm soprano.  Warm soprano, needle drop, gotta be Lucky.  Muted trumpet is very enjoyable, I'm thinking I've got this -- I'll say Clark Terry.  That sure sounds like Hawk.  Just for fun, I'll say Lionel Hampton ;).  I have it as this.  Man... great just doesn't age.

Track 13 - Sounds Bill Evans-ish to me, but I have no idea what I'm listening to.  Grooving along with it, though.

Track 14 - Sounds like a lullaby.  Which and by whom, no idea.

Track 15 - What's going on here?  Old recording played over by a highly accomplished modern player out of the Cannonball school.  Not Cannonball, but perhaps... well, piss... can't think of his name.  White guy who sounds EXACTLY like Cannonball (can actually fool me at times).  Frick.  [Later]  Still can't think of his damned name.  

Track 16 - No clue.  

Loved your answers, btw.  I burst out laughing a few times.

#1: It is Bechet.  Larry ID'd it earlier.

#6: Hot Ptah ID'd it earlier.  Some of the compression may have been due to their trying to squeeze almost 30 minutes per LP side.

#8: Not any of the guys you mentioned, but I know what you mean.  This is the most recent of the tracks on this BFT, and these players run in those circles.  I'm actually not in love with this type of jazz, but I do like this track.

#9: You are correct.

#10: Not Stanley, not Willis.

#11: Not Buddy Tate, but a contemporary of his.  Not Gene Harris - a much earlier generation.

#12: You got it.

#13: Not Bill Evans.

#15: A contemporary of Cannonball's, not white.

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i can't even tell soprano from clarinet so i'll try the bass players :rolleyes:

4. nhop and sam jones with catherine. sam jones is my hero. his playing has such a playful quality. nhop rises to the occasion and is on his most tasteful here. but sam's solos, oh man! 

10. the elephant in the room? this should be jazz messengers but the bassist carries the drummer.  not morgan on trumpet. the drummer also misses the solo pickup. so maybe an outtake? no clue.

11. another bass player with great time and feel. is it george tucker? 

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5 hours ago, hgweber said:

i can't even tell soprano from clarinet so i'll try the bass players :rolleyes:

4. nhop and sam jones with catherine. sam jones is my hero. his playing has such a playful quality. nhop rises to the occasion and is on his most tasteful here. but sam's solos, oh man! 

10. the elephant in the room? this should be jazz messengers but the bassist carries the drummer.  not morgan on trumpet. the drummer also misses the solo pickup. so maybe an outtake? no clue.

11. another bass player with great time and feel. is it george tucker? 

#4: Correct!

#10: Not an outtake.

#11: Not Tucker.

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18 hours ago, mjzee said:

 

#15: A contemporary of Cannonball's, not white.

Who's the guy I'm thinking of, though!?  It's making me cuckoo!  

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1 hour ago, tkeith said:

Who's the guy I'm thinking of, though!?  It's making me cuckoo!  

Jim Snidero?

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#3 is "The Mooche" from Herbie Mann's 'Today' album.  I have a lot of happy listening ahead to try to figure out some other titles, and #10 is going to need to be added to my collection if it isn't already there.  I don't doubt the technical shortcomings pointed out, but my untrained ears just go :wub: for this.  Enjoying the drumming immensely.  Billy Higgins?

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3 hours ago, felser said:

#3 is "The Mooche" from Herbie Mann's 'Today' album.  I have a lot of happy listening ahead to try to figure out some other titles, and #10 is going to need to be added to my collection if it isn't already there.  I don't doubt the technical shortcomings pointed out, but my untrained ears just go :wub: for this.  Enjoying the drumming immensely.  Billy Higgins?

#3: Correct!

#10: Not Higgins.

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