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Hot Ptah

BFT 192 Link and Discussion

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Posted (edited)

Here is Blindfold Test 192, which contains a wide variety of music.  I hope you enjoy it!

Tracks 13, 14 and 15 are actually one track, all part of the same live performance of a song. The different sections of the track are given different titles on the album, and that is how ITunes listed it. Either you will know this three part track instantly or else it may be difficult to identify. 
 

But then identifying each track is only part of the fun. Your reactions to the music are just as important, even if you can’t identify it. 

 

http://thomkeith.net/index.php/blindfold-tests/

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Posted (edited)

Track #1 is "Contemplation," the McCoy Tyner piece--which I think first appeared on The Real McCoy.  That, of course, is the ultimate version. This one features a nice bass opening; it makes me wonder if the bassist is the leader. More-than-respectable work from the tenor and piano, but they don't measure up to Henderson and Tyner.

Track #3 is "You Stepped Out of a Dream," but I don't think I can guess on the musicians.  It sounds bit "out" at times, and performing it as as a duet makes it pretty distinctive.

 

 

Edited by Milestones

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Posted (edited)

Track 9 sounds like '50s Sun Ra, will take a bit of time to identify....OK, track 1 here.

Plenty of other interesting music, but I'm unlikely to identify any; most is not in my usual listening wheelhouse. Will revisit in more detail and hope for ideas. Thanks for posting the BFT.

Edited by T.D.

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Track 5: Cal Tjader?

Track 8: Chicago blues 1960s?

Track9: Charles Mingus?

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3 hours ago, BillF said:

Track 5: Cal Tjader?

I had to chime in on that one .....Tjader recorded that tune in the early 1970s, but this is the original Version by someone who was an important inspiration for Tjader to usw the vibes in a Latin context. I will not give it away right now.

Is that Danny Gatton on track 8?

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7 hours ago, Milestones said:

Track #1 is "Contemplation," the McCoy Tyner piece--which I think first appeared on The Real McCoy.  That, of course, is the ultimate version. This one features a nice bass opening; it makes me wonder if the bassist is the leader. More-than-respectable work from the tenor and piano, but they don't measure up to Henderson and Tyner.

Track #3 is "You Stepped Out of a Dream," but I don't think I can guess on the musicians.  It sounds bit "out" at times, and performing it as as a duet makes it pretty distinctive.

 

 

Those song identifications are correct. Very interesting comments! I think that you will be mildly surprised at the artist IDs for both tracks. 

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7 hours ago, T.D. said:

Track 9 sounds like '50s Sun Ra, will take a bit of time to identify....OK, track 1 here.

Plenty of other interesting music, but I'm unlikely to identify any; most is not in my usual listening wheelhouse. Will revisit in more detail and hope for ideas. Thanks for posting the BFT.

Yes! You identified the artist, album and song on Track 9. That is one of my favorites by this artist. 
 

I look forward to your additional comments.

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5 hours ago, BillF said:

Track 5: Cal Tjader?

Track 8: Chicago blues 1960s?

Track9: Charles Mingus?

Track 5’is not Cal Tjader. The first time I heard this song I wondered if that was him on vibes. But the recording is dated before he started recording.

Track 8 is a little later than the 1960s. The artist has been obviously inspired by the post-War Chicago blues but is not from that city. 
 

Your comment on Track 9 is so close to my personal experience. I had heard of Sun Ra in the 1970s but had not heard him yet. I listened to a Sunday morning program on WORT-FM, a non-profit community radio station in Madison, Wisconsin. Two men said that they were going to play a show devoted only to the early recordings of Sun Ra. They enthusiastically urged their listeners to give it a chance, that the music was accessible and that “some of it sounds like Charles Mingus to us.” That reference to Charles Mingus made me want to listen. I loved the music. That radio show was a revelation to me. A few weeks later I moved to Ann Arbor, Michigan. On one of my first days there I visited Wazoo used record store and irresponsibly spent too much of my student loan money on a complete used set of the Impulse reissues of Sun Ra recordings. I was on my way from there in a love of Sun Ra’s music. 
 

If those unpaid volunteer DJ’s had not mentioned Charles Mingus that morning I would not have listened to that radio show. 

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Had a quick speed listen last night, a few seconds of each selection. Artists that were immediately recognizable, in no particular order, were Anthony Braxton, Sun Ra, and Tito Puente(?).

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1 hour ago, mikeweil said:

I had to chime in on that one .....Tjader recorded that tune in the early 1970s, but this is the original Version by someone who was an important inspiration for Tjader to usw the vibes in a Latin context. I will not give it away right now.

Is that Danny Gatton on track 8?

Ah, you know exactly who it is on Track 5. 
 

Track 8 is not Danny Gatton, but you are in the right neighborhood. 

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Posted (edited)

1 - Nice version of McCoy Tyner's beautiful "Contemplation".  The bass player (Reggie Workman?) and tenor player (John Stubblefield? David Murray?  Could be a lot of good guys) had me at “hello”, and I like the piano (John Hicks?) but the drummer Rashied Ali-ish) doesn’t necessarily do it for me.   This is a nice to have, nice to add cut.

 

 

2 -  OK, I can see already this is going to be a really expensive BFT for me.  Love this.  The bass vamp with the percussion is great to my ears.  Could just listen to them play time and dig it for an extended period.  I really like what the tenor player is doing over top, and love his tone.  Glad they didn’t try to fit any other instruments in, this is perfect just as it is, with space for all the players to be heard.  This is a must-have, must add cut.

 

3 – “You Stepped Out of a Dream”.  You’re specializing in really good Tenor players so far in this BFT.  I assume this is of recent vintage (which to me means anything from the last 35 years or so LOL) based on the bass sound.  Quite a nice performance, and would be nice to have, nice to own.

 

4 – And you’re sub-specializing in really interesting bass/percussion motifs.  I like this one quite a bit, even though it is outside my usual sweet spot some, with that vocal.   Not sold on each musician individually, but the overall feel is awesome.    Does not flag in interest at all throughout the entire 13+ minutes!  This is another must-have, must add cut.

 

5 – 50’s or ealy 60’s Cal Tjader, I would think.  No chance I’ll identify past that.  I likely have it already.

 

6 – You definitely put nice thought into the flow of this BFT as a listening experience, thanks.   This is not “jazz”, is it?  Pop music from a different culture.  Interested to know where and especially when.   It’s a fun listen, but not something I’d ever think to go look for.  But they definitely seem to be really good at whatever it is they are doing.

 

7 – I listen to and own stuff like this, though I’m never quite sure why.  And I tend to limit it to time and place (NYC in the 60’s, Paris in the late 60’s-early 70’s). 

 

 

8 - This is not “jazz”, is it?  Good blues guitarist.  – I listen to and own stuff like this, though I find a little goes a long way for me.  And I tend to limit it to time and place (Chicago in the 50’s and 60’s, mainly – and this isn’t from there).  I see I have developed useful templates for my responses, might as well utilize them 😊.

 

9 – I like this.  A lot.  50’s, I assume.  Could even be early Sun Ra with John Gilmor, though it could also be players thought of as much much more conservative (and there’s a lesson/statement here).  .   This is a very nice to have, very nice to add cut.

 

 

10 – The beginning really threw me, thought it was going to be something very different than it turned out to be and is confusing to as far as the vintage.  I would think something much older otherwise, but beginning pulls me toward newer.   I like it a good bit, not sure who or when or where, look forward to finding out.  Good tenor solo!   This is a very nice to have, very nice to add cut.

 

11 – Very similar in conception to #2, and l like this, but I liked that one a lot better.  The rhythm feels more static here, though the tenor player is really good.  I assume this is older than #2.  This is a nice to have, nice to add cut.

 

12 – Fonkey, man!   I do like it, even over the course of 16 minutes, but can also live without it at that length.  Am curious for the reveal.  Reminds me of what Azteca was trying to do in the early 70's.

 

13/14/15 – Wow, this is Gary Duncan’s and John Cippolina's guitar solos excerpted from "Who Do You Love" on Quicksilver Messenger Service's classic "Happy Trails" album, live at the Fillmore West, 1968/69.  Hearing this is like breathing for me, has been for 50 years.   Desert island disc for me.  Will be a huge case of YMMV for others hearing this.

Edited by felser

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3 hours ago, JSngry said:

Had a quick speed listen last night, a few seconds of each selection. Artists that were immediately recognizable, in no particular order, were Anthony Braxton, Sun Ra, and Tito Puente(?).

Oh yeah, Fela, too, iirc.

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8 minutes ago, JSngry said:

Oh yeah, Fela, too, iirc.

You are off to an excellent start, Jim!

21 minutes ago, felser said:

1 - Nice version of McCoy Tyner's beautiful "Contemplation".  The bass player (Reggie Workman?) and tenor player (John Stubblefield? David Murray?  Could be a lot of good guys) had me at “hello”, and I like the piano (John Hicks?) but the drummer Rashied Ali-ish) doesn’t necessarily do it for me.   This is a nice to have, nice to add cut.

That is correct as to the composer and song title. I think that the musicians would be pleased to be compared to the musicians you have mentioned. 

 

2 -  OK, I can see already this is going to be a really expensive BFT for me.  Love this.  The bass vamp with the percussion is great to my ears.  Could just listen to them play time and dig it for an extended period.  I really like what the tenor player is doing over top, and love his tone.  Glad they didn’t try to fit any other instruments in, this is perfect just as it is, with space for all the players to be heard.  This is a must-have, must add cut.

I really like it too!

3 – “You Stepped Out of a Dream”.  You’re specializing in really good Tenor players so far in this BFT.  I assume this is of recent vintage (which to me means anything from the last 35 years or so LOL) based on the bass sound.  Quite a nice performance, and would be nice to have, nice to own.

It is not as recent as you think!

4 – And you’re sub-specializing in really interesting bass/percussion motifs.  I like this one quite a bit, even though it is outside my usual sweet spot some, with that vocal.   Not sold on each musician individually, but the overall feel is awesome.    Does not flag in interest at all throughout the entire 13+ minutes!  This is another must-have, must add cut.

I find this track very compelling too. 

5 – 50’s or ealy 60’s Cal Tjader, I would think.  No chance I’ll identify past that.  I likely have it already.

It is earlier, and not Cal Tjader. As Mike Weil has pointed out, it inspired Cal Tjader. 

6 – You definitely put nice thought into the flow of this BFT as a listening experience, thanks.   This is not “jazz”, is it?  Pop music from a different culture.  Interested to know where and especially when.   It’s a fun listen, but not something I’d ever think to go look for.  But they definitely seem to be really good at whatever it is they are doing.

It is pop music from a different culture. I think you might be surprised at who this is. 

7 – I listen to and own stuff like this, though I’m never quite sure why.  And I tend to limit it to time and place (NYC in the 60’s, Paris in the late 60’s-early 70’s). 

I think you will enjoy the Reveal on this one. 

 

8 - This is not “jazz”, is it?  Good blues guitarist.  – I listen to and own stuff like this, though I find a little goes a long way for me.  And I tend to limit it to time and place (Chicago in the 50’s and 60’s, mainly – and this isn’t from there).  I see I have developed useful templates for my responses, might as well utilize them 😊.

It is a blues album and the guitarist is the leader. 

9 – I like this.  A lot.  50’s, I assume.  Could even be early Sun Ra with John Gilmor, though it could also be players thought of as much much more conservative (and there’s a lesson/statement here).  .   This is a very nice to have, very nice to add cut.

It is an early Sun Ra track, and has been identified by T.D. 

 

10 – The beginning really threw me, thought it was going to be something very different than it turned out to be and is confusing to as far as the vintage.  I would think something much older otherwise, but beginning pulls me toward newer.   I like it a good bit, not sure who or when or where, look forward to finding out.  Good tenor solo!   This is a very nice to have, very nice to add cut.

Again, the Reveal should be very interesting to you. 

11 – Very similar in conception to #2, and l like this, but I liked that one a lot better.  The rhythm feels more static here, though the tenor player is really good.  I assume this is older than #2.  This is a nice to have, nice to add cut.

It is older than #2, but only by a few years. 

12 – Fonkey, man!   I do like it, even over the course of 16 minutes, but can also live without it at that length.  Am curious for the reveal.  Reminds me of what Azteca was trying to do in the early 70's.

Did you catch the soloist in the middle? He is a musician who is well known to the members of this forum. 

13/14/15 – Wow, this is Gary Duncan’s and John Cippolina's guitar solos excerpted from "Who Do You Love" on Quicksilver Messenger Service's classic "Happy Trails" album, live at the Fillmore West, 1968/69.  Hearing this is like breathing for me, has been for 50 years.   Desert island disc for me.  Will be a huge case of YMMV for others hearing this.

Right you are! I thought that either everyone of a certain age would know this one, or that no one would know it. Gary Duncan's wife wrote an autobiography, and her email address was in the book. I emailed her and asked her if Gary Duncan was knowledgeable about jazz when he recorded the 1960s Quicksilver albums. She replied that Duncan listened to John Coltrane by the hour, and also to a lot of Miles Davis, during the mid to late 1960s. 

 

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Quicksilver also must have listened to some Dave Brubeck, as their great "Gold and Silver" from the landmark first album seems to be strongly influenced by "Take Five".

 

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Ok, let's go through this window while it's open..

TRACK ONE - Branford? Somebody of that era? It's in tune, that's for sure! I miss Jean Carne here, btw. No, not Branford. Sounds sincere, whoever it is, but otoh, these questions have already been answered, so getting a 100 on the test is pretty much expected. Maybe the pianist is digging a little deeper, maybe a little? I hate that I'm getting to the point in life where sincerity alone no longer gets me to where I want to be taken, but here I am.

TRACK TWO - There go them opening bass vamp agains! Kinda like 70s Miles w/o the electricity (otehr than the bass), kinda. It's a dead-end, but not suicidal, if that makes any sense. But - some electricity (other than the bass) would have helped, imo. That's one of the many things that Miles got in that music, painting a full spectrum with a full palliate. This sounds like a really good paining that's not quite finished. I missed Archie Shepp here, btw.

TRACK THREE - Ok, this one's easy! SO many memories! SO much to say, and none of it is enough. This is one of the great musics of our time, ALL of it. https://www.discogs.com/Anthony-Braxton-Five-Pieces-1975/release/1035173

TRACK FOUR - Initial fears dismissed pretty early on.Real playing here, not playing-link, real playing. Tenor sound is a little familiar, but damned if I know from where. I like this a lot, both as music and as record. My guess is early 70s, and probably not American, at least not the entire band. Damn, it's good!

TRACK FIVE - Sounds like a 50s Tito Puente RCA record, all three parts, 50s, Tito Puente, and RCA record. I could be wrong, though.

TRACK SIX - Sounds like something Bollywood. There's a LOT of things going on in Bollywood, even the uninteresting stuff is interesting!

TRACK SEVEN - AEC, I think. That shit is focused!

TRACK EIGHT - Roy Buchanan? I don't dislike it, I just don't need it, it offers me no insight into anything that I find useful or otherwise inspiring about life and/or music. But i don't dislike it, really I don't. It's not evil, it's just totally not for me.

TRACK NINE - Ra, glorious Ra!

TRACK TEN - Good god, is that a Casio?????? That's the same tune as #9 and it might well be a Casio!!!! Not totally convinced that it's Ra, but a damn good tribute if it's not.

TRACK ELEVEN - This is the kind of thing that everybody involved no doubt had a burning compulsion to do. So now what?

TRACK TWELVE - "So now what?" is never a question that Fela leaves you asking. THAT'S what, there it is, right there. That was it, that is it, and that will always be it. Tony Allen is still alive and making records, which is great. Lester Bowie is not, and that still makes me sad. Neither is Fela, but you know, that's why you do it, because when you're gone, it's either been done or it hasn't.

TRACK THIRTEEN - that's pretty sloppy...no real phrasing, pretty basic riff/answer, nobody breathes. Is this a rock band? What the hell is that drummer doing? He got a hole in his pocket! At least there's a little bit of dynamics, which give the illusion of variety, even though there is not any, not really. BREATHE MOTHERFUCKER! I know it's a guitar, but BREATHE DAMMIT!!!! I hate msuic that doesn't breathe, I don't care what kind it is. Even if the effect is to NOT breathe, you can tell it when it's on purpose. This is NOT on purpose, this is somebody about to die a musical death from not knowing how to breathe. Hope they fared better offstage?

TRACK FOURTEEN - and now we get "exotic", ok....at least there's space, let's hope it stays there...

TRACK FIFTEEN - oops, no such luck. And now a Bo Diddley-like beat. I miss Jerome.

Oh well, can't win 'em all. The good stuff here was very good, and much of the rest was good to listen to form an opinion about, if only about that one piece. Good clean fun, thanks!

 

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Posted (edited)

I think track 10 is Ra, tune #9 here.

That was the first Sun Ra album I ever purchased; Sound of Joy (track #9) was the second or third...But I recognized the original, not the '90s version...

Edited by T.D.

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2 hours ago, T.D. said:

I think track 10 is Ra, tune #9 here.

That was the first Sun Ra album I ever purchased; Sound of Joy (track #9) was the second or third...But I recognized the original, not the '90s version...

You are correct! I wanted to show how Sun Ra’s performance of the same composition changed over 30 years. 

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12 hours ago, JSngry said:

TRACK THIRTEEN - that's pretty sloppy...no real phrasing, pretty basic riff/answer, nobody breathes. Is this a rock band? What the hell is that drummer doing? He got a hole in his pocket! At least there's a little bit of dynamics, which give the illusion of variety, even though there is not any, not really. BREATHE MOTHERFUCKER! I know it's a guitar, but BREATHE DAMMIT!!!! I hate msuic that doesn't breathe, I don't care what kind it is. Even if the effect is to NOT breathe, you can tell it when it's on purpose. This is NOT on purpose, this is somebody about to die a musical death from not knowing how to breathe. Hope they fared better offstage?

They didn't fare better offstage.  Actually kind of eerie what you brought up:

Death[edit]

Cipollina died on 29 May 1989 at the age of 45 after a career in music that spanned twenty five years.[7] His cause of death was alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, which he suffered from most of his life, and which is exacerbated by smoking.

alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (A1AD or AATD) is a genetic disorder that may result in lung disease or liver disease.[1] Onset of lung problems is typically between 20 and 50 years old.[1] This may result in shortness of breath, wheezing, or an increased risk of lung infections.[1][2] Complications may include COPD, cirrhosis, neonatal jaundice, or panniculitis.[1]

 

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Too bad about that. Was not a fan, and did not know.

Reading the previous responses after making mine, yeah, ok Quicksilver. Last time I knowingly heard that cut was no later than 1971, and by then I had already begun getting away from rock. Didn't do too much for me then, obviously does even less for me today.

Still, too bad about that on a human level. On a musical level, though...breathe. Music needs to breathe. Even when it's non-stop WHEEEEE like on Track 7, you gotta give it shape, contour, perceived breathing points if not actual ones. This poor guy, RIP, just droned on and on.

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Cipollina is all the way to the right in this group picture.  This was the chorus from their only "hit" single.  So ironic.

Image result for quicksilver hit fresh air

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Posted (edited)

15 hours ago, JSngry said:

Ok, let's go through this window while it's open..

TRACK ONE - Branford? Somebody of that era? It's in tune, that's for sure! I miss Jean Carne here, btw. No, not Branford. Sounds sincere, whoever it is, but otoh, these questions have already been answered, so getting a 100 on the test is pretty much expected. Maybe the pianist is digging a little deeper, maybe a little? I hate that I'm getting to the point in life where sincerity alone no longer gets me to where I want to be taken, but here I am.

The musicians are younger than Branford. I love to read these unfiltered comments when you don't know who it is. 

TRACK TWO - There go them opening bass vamp agains! Kinda like 70s Miles w/o the electricity (otehr than the bass), kinda. It's a dead-end, but not suicidal, if that makes any sense. But - some electricity (other than the bass) would have helped, imo. That's one of the many things that Miles got in that music, painting a full spectrum with a full palliate. This sounds like a really good paining that's not quite finished. I missed Archie Shepp here, btw.

I recognize the opening bass line as uncannily similar to the opening bass line on the Beatles' "Long Long Long" on the White Album. I don't know if these musicians know that music or not. 

TRACK THREE - Ok, this one's easy! SO many memories! SO much to say, and none of it is enough. This is one of the great musics of our time, ALL of it. https://www.discogs.com/Anthony-Braxton-Five-Pieces-1975/release/1035173

Yes! I wondered how many listeners would know this. In the 1970s it seemed like everyone I knew who liked jazz was familiar with Anthony Braxton's releases as they were released, including this album. I bought this album on vinyl when it came out.  This recording is also on Anthony Braxton's Mosaic box. 

TRACK FOUR - Initial fears dismissed pretty early on.Real playing here, not playing-link, real playing. Tenor sound is a little familiar, but damned if I know from where. I like this a lot, both as music and as record. My guess is early 70s, and probably not American, at least not the entire band. Damn, it's good!

This is considerably later than the early 1970s. I think you will be interested in the Reveal on this one. 

TRACK FIVE - Sounds like a 50s Tito Puente RCA record, all three parts, 50s, Tito Puente, and RCA record. I could be wrong, though.

You are correct! However, I am often frustrated by the lack of recording information for Tito's music. If there is a good guide to his earlier recordings, with information about recording dates and musicians, I have not found it. So this could have been recorded in the late 1940s or in the 1950s. 

TRACK SIX - Sounds like something Bollywood. There's a LOT of things going on in Bollywood, even the uninteresting stuff is interesting!

I think you will be quite surprised at who this is. 

TRACK SEVEN - AEC, I think. That shit is focused!

Not AEC. Focused for sure!

TRACK EIGHT - Roy Buchanan? I don't dislike it, I just don't need it, it offers me no insight into anything that I find useful or otherwise inspiring about life and/or music. But i don't dislike it, really I don't. It's not evil, it's just totally not for me.

It is Roy Buchanan. I respect your comments. I like his playing more than you do, but I understand your point. 

TRACK NINE - Ra, glorious Ra!

Yes! It is glorious! This has been identified. 

TRACK TEN - Good god, is that a Casio?????? That's the same tune as #9 and it might well be a Casio!!!! Not totally convinced that it's Ra, but a damn good tribute if it's not.

It is Sun Ra, and it is the same tune, recorded by Sun Ra about thirty years after he recorded Track Nine. Both have been identified, by song title and album. The album's liner notes do not tell us whether that is a Casio. 

TRACK ELEVEN - This is the kind of thing that everybody involved no doubt had a burning compulsion to do. So now what?

From documented sources on the leader, he did have a burning compulsion to do this, for years. 

TRACK TWELVE - "So now what?" is never a question that Fela leaves you asking. THAT'S what, there it is, right there. That was it, that is it, and that will always be it. Tony Allen is still alive and making records, which is great. Lester Bowie is not, and that still makes me sad. Neither is Fela, but you know, that's why you do it, because when you're gone, it's either been done or it hasn't.

Yes, it is Fela with Lester Bowie. I just bought that massive Fela box set from the "Offering and Looking For" section of this board, and this is one of the many delights. 

TRACK THIRTEEN - that's pretty sloppy...no real phrasing, pretty basic riff/answer, nobody breathes. Is this a rock band? What the hell is that drummer doing? He got a hole in his pocket! At least there's a little bit of dynamics, which give the illusion of variety, even though there is not any, not really. BREATHE MOTHERFUCKER! I know it's a guitar, but BREATHE DAMMIT!!!! I hate msuic that doesn't breathe, I don't care what kind it is. Even if the effect is to NOT breathe, you can tell it when it's on purpose. This is NOT on purpose, this is somebody about to die a musical death from not knowing how to breathe. Hope they fared better offstage?

TRACK FOURTEEN - and now we get "exotic", ok....at least there's space, let's hope it stays there...

TRACK FIFTEEN - oops, no such luck. And now a Bo Diddley-like beat. I miss Jerome.

You are not a Quicksilver Messenger Service fan.  I wanted to see how listeners would react to this, and your reactions are honest. I know that they are not as good as jazz giants. 

Oh well, can't win 'em all. The good stuff here was very good, and much of the rest was good to listen to form an opinion about, if only about that one piece. Good clean fun, thanks!

Glad to give you some good clean fun in this sordid age we live in, Jim! I think that you will be intrigued when Track 4 is identified. 

 

 

Edited by Hot Ptah

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5 minutes ago, Hot Ptah said:

Yes, it is Fela with Lester Bowie. I just bought that massive Fela box set from the "Offering and Looking For" section of this board, and this is one of the many delights. 

Wow, you bought that box...When I heard there were albums with Lester Bowie, I briefly considered the set, but concluded it was more than I'd listen to. Glad you enjoy it.

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I can't say that I've heard (or even heard of) Roy Buchanan.  I've heard of Quicksilver, but that's about it...before my time is part of it.

 

 

 

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8 minutes ago, Milestones said:

I can't say that I've heard (or even heard of) Roy Buchanan.  I've heard of Quicksilver, but that's about it...before my time is part of it.

 

 

 

Quicksilver is definitely part of a certain time.

Roy Buchanan died tragically at too young an age.

 

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Roy Buchannan was semi-hot for a quick minute in the early-ish 70s. Had a downbeat article and a few albums on Polydor, as well as an appearance on Don Kirshner's Rock Concert (the one on ABC). I always felt that his playing reflected him not really being a singer (if he did sing to any note, I never heard it). Great player, obviously, just not something I could ever relate to. For me, the further any music gets from having a vocal (not lyrical, mind you, vocal) foundation, the dicier it gets. Especially a vernacular music like "blues".

And yeah, he died pretty early. I guess substance abuse followed him most of his adult life. I played with an old guy in the early 2000s who had known him in DC and that was the story I got. Just a ginormous monkey on his back, one of those cases that seems like a person is just doomed no matter what. Very sad.

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