Ken Dryden

BFT 203 Available For Download

43 posts in this topic

17 hours ago, EKE BBB said:

The song in track 1 is obviously the one in side A from this Victor 78 rpm .

But track 1 is not the original Victor recording by the composer, neither any of the two Associated Transcriptions solos.

I will try to identify who's playing later.

Excellent starter! :) 

The wrong track was loaded from the CD I selected (my fault, obviously), so yes, it is "Handful of Keys," penned by Fats Waller. I can't figure what happened as the track intended was not even adjacent to it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking again at Tracks 1 and 16, would my good friend Rossano Sportiello be involved in this Blindfold Test?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ken Dryden said:

The wrong track was loaded from the CD I selected (my fault, obviously), so yes, it is "Handful of Keys," penned by Fats Waller. I can't figure what happened as the track intended was not even adjacent to it.

 

Good to know I still can identify this stride piano evergreen and one of my favourite compositions ever! :) 

But still, I need to identify who's playing. Already double-checked with some famous versions (Wellstood, Sutton...) and no positive. Yet...

Edited by EKE BBB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, JSngry said:

Ok, dinner's on. let's roll.

TRACK ONE: "Handful Of Keys"? Dick Hyman? I like it well enough, always like some stride, but it feels just a little rushed, internally. Not a deal-breaker, though. Good guess, but it is not Dick Hyman.

TRACK TWO - "Moose The Mooche", solo guitar? Lenny Breau? I hope not...this is jagged to my ears, jagged and a bit rushed. I'm not sure whether Lenny Breau ever recorded this song, but it is not him.

TRACK THREE -  Nice tune, Don't like that type of tenor playing, though. Head had a strong Dexter vibe to it, but the solo was all Brecker-y and shit. Speak with one voice, please, don't be Rich Little about it!

TRACK FOUR - Please note - "Tee", not Cee". Makes a difference. Love Clark, but this band...it's not his, I hope? Like Buddy Rich without Buddy Rich. WAAAAAY on top of the beat, everybody, except CT and again note - CT, not CP). Maybe you had to be there? A very cryptic reply, but you obviously know the song and the artist. It is not Clark Terry's band.

TRACK FIVE -  Very interesting ideas in left hand, almost pedestrian ideas in the right..."Yesterdays, all that Bartok seemed so far away...seriosly, this sounds like a player who maybe just needed more season to get both hands on the same page, in terms of ideas.Oh, there's guitar....shades of (or in the shade of) Tristano/Bauer  Artists and album were identified earlier in this thread.

TRACK SIX - Oh yeah, Uptown String Quartet, great band, and nice to hear them with out Max. Love that, but string quartet is one of my favorite instrumentations, so much opportunity there...now, whose wedding to I have to go to to hear THIS band during dinner? Betty's? She done come along darn it. I think they disbanded not long after making this CD, though I did get to hear them perform around this time period.

TRACK SEVEN - Say what you will about Herbie Mann, he sounded the same then as he would decades later. Other than that, I've never really liked the arrangements on this record. Too foo-foo. The soloists, otoh, hey, there they are! I love me this era of Phil Woods as much as the later stuff makes me cringe (usally). Motherfucker came to play, and DID! Same thing for Bill Evans. But that chart....not for me, I'm afraid. Waltz those vibes outta there, please! All three soloists are correct.

TRACK EIGHT - Spring is here...no, will be here...eventually...hopefully? Wow, Pat Williams-esque writing...but get that guitar out of there, please! Oh, it's probably their date, right? Ok, save the chart forsomebody else, like Art Farmer (oh wait, can't do that...) This would have been better (in almost every way) if it had been done in the 70s. Nice writing, though, very nice writing. The arranger thinks very highly of the guitarist...

TRACK NINE - "Tricotism", LOVE that tune! I'm not a stickler for intonation, but this player is maybe just a leeeeeetle bit, shall we say, "cavalier"...So, either Ron Cater or Rufus Reid, among "name" players. Can't dfault the ideas, though, excellent ideas! And excellent chops as well. Identified as Rufus Reid earlier in the thread.

TRACK TEN - Getz? Nah, a little too square-on to be Getz, or any of those guys. Not what's new, but well played, and sincere. No idea who it is. Doesn't need to be new when that is there, what?

TRACK ELEVEN - "Delilah", FLOORSHOW! I think this record was on a BFT within the last few months? No worries, it's a GREAT record. thnks for including it here!

TRACK TWELVE - Oh my...is that a Mingus tune, yes? So it should swing, yes? So why doesn't it? Sorry peoples, right notes are jsut the beginning of the battle. It don't. etc...otoh, this is not one that everybody plays, so kudos for picking ti for the program, whoever you trumpetpianoduet is..

TRACK THIRTEEN - That's Bobby & Harold, Timeless All-Stars, right? Billy on drums? Not sure if I have this record or not. of I don't I should probably look for it. Later Harold Land (I mean later-70s and beyond) turns me on, actually. This is a fine cut for my money (Even if it's free!). Bobby, Harold, Billy and the Timeless All-Stars are all present on this recording.

TRACK FOURTEEN - I would be in no hurry to come home to this. Stay home once there maybe, but yo gotta get me there with more than this, ok? Nice, MOR music, expertly played, and as the old saying says, I'd not kick it out of bed for eating crackers. But it would have to be in the bed before I could kick it out...may be you had to have already been there? Put this out in the late 60s, drench it in reverb, hey, it would stay blogged forever. But they didn't, so... Your cryptic song identification is correct.

TRACK FIFTEEN - That intro disturbed me, but it got better. A little off-kilter, and not in a bad way. Roger Kellaway? Or are there two pianists here? Jacki Byard? Did I ever think i would put those two names together? I did NOT!!!! Neither Roger Kellaway or Jaki Byard are present. Can you identify the song?

TRACK SIXTEEN - Ok, that's Tatum ground, tread carefully...Almost sounds like the Piano starts Here version, but not quite...cleaned up sonically and just a little heavier-handed in the execution? I will say this, no matter what - regardless of one's gut reaction about Taum, on anything, it's most likely wrong, there's always more to it than you think, no matter how much you like it or don't. Always more, ALWAYS more. That's been my experience anyway. Ok, I had to a/B and I don't think this is the OPiano Starts here version, the applause at the end is different. So I don't know what this is. if it's a different Tatum performance or a clever imitation. Those are not the same thing,s obviously, os I sincerely hope that it's not an imitation. Have you seen the video of Eldar Djangirov's replication of one of Art Tatum's arrangements on what was Art Tatum's own piano (now owned by a private fan)? Here is the link to the transcription of "Tiger Rag." This BFT recording is not Eldar, that would have spoiled the fun.

Track 17 also has a cryptic identification, but you obviously know your seasons...

Quite a listen, Ken, thanks for sharing!

You're welcome. It is always a challenge to find music that is fun without being overly obscure.

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. Sounds like Fats Waller solo?  But the sound might be too good to be pre-1943.
2. Chopsy guitar.  Maybe Jimmy Bruno?
3. Sonny Rollins St. Thomas is all over this as an influence, unless it's actually Sonny.
4. Live big band date.  I'm thinking the first long solo is Clarinet. Woody Herman?
5. John Abercrombie?
6. Since all the music comes from stringed instruments that are bowed at least some of the time, I'm going to guess this is the string quartet led by Maxine Roach (Max's daughter)
7. Jitterbug Waltz.  Flute, alto, trumpet, vibes and rhythm, with frontliners that lay out much of the time.  Also guitare and harp.
8. Gerald Wilson band?
9. Bass led group, hold the group.  NHOP?
10. What's New.  The way the sax player makes the tenor sound like an alto reminds me of Stan Getz.
11. Violin, mainstream sounding.  Stephane Grappelli?
12. Trumpet (fluegel?) gets the first solo, so I'll guess that they are the leader.  Drummerless, bassless too, just brass and piano.  We never seem to get enough Art Farmer, could be him.
13. McCoy-ish piano intro, vibes, tenor sounds seventies or later.  Post-Blue Note Bobby Hutcherson?
14. You'd be so nice to come home to with acoustic and electric guitars.  Off the top of my head, I'm not familiar with any recordings with this instrumention.  Joe Pass overdubbing himself?
15. Striding out!  Don Pullen?  Jaki Byard?
16. Virtuoso solo piano.  Barry Harris?
17. Definitely sounds like multiple acoustic guitars.  Herb Ellis and Barney Kessel?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, randyhersom said:

1. Sounds like Fats Waller solo?  But the sound might be too good to be pre-1943.

    It is well after 1943.
2. Chopsy guitar.  Maybe Jimmy Bruno?

    Not Jimmy Bruno.
3. Sonny Rollins St. Thomas is all over this as an influence, unless it's actually Sonny.

    Not Sonny Rollins.
4. Live big band date.  I'm thinking the first long solo is Clarinet. Woody Herman?

    Not Woody Herman.    
5. John Abercrombie?

    Not John Abercrombie.

6. Since all the music comes from stringed instruments that are bowed at least some of the time, I'm going to guess this is the string quartet led by Maxine Roach (Max's daughter)

    It is, it has been identified.
7. Jitterbug Waltz.  Flute, alto, trumpet, vibes and rhythm, with frontliners that lay out much of the time.  Also guitare and harp.

    Yes.
8. Gerald Wilson band?

    Not Gerald Wilson band.

9. Bass led group, hold the group.  NHOP?

    It is not Niels Pedersen.


10. What's New.  The way the sax player makes the tenor sound like an alto reminds me of Stan Getz.

      Correct song, but it is not Getz.


11. Violin, mainstream sounding.  Stephane Grappelli?

      Not Grappelli, this track has already been identified.


12. Trumpet (fluegel?) gets the first solo, so I'll guess that they are the leader.  Drummerless, bassless too, just brass and piano.  We never seem to get enough Art Farmer, could be him.

      Not Art Farmer.
13. McCoy-ish piano intro, vibes, tenor sounds seventies or later.  Post-Blue Note Bobby Hutcherson?

      Bobby Hutcherson is present.


14. You'd be so nice to come home to with acoustic and electric guitars.  Off the top of my head, I'm not familiar with any recordings with this instrumention.  Joe Pass overdubbing himself?

     Right song, but Joe Pass isn't present.


15. Striding out!  Don Pullen?  Jaki Byard?

      Not Pullen or Byard.


16. Virtuoso solo piano.  Barry Harris?

      Not Barry Harris.
17. Definitely sounds like multiple acoustic guitars.  Herb Ellis and Barney Kessel?

      Neither Herb Ellis nor Barney Kessel play on this track.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting close to reveal time so I wanted to revisit. I got nothin'...unless that's Scofield and Lovano on track 3? 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Dub Modal said:

Getting close to reveal time so I wanted to revisit. I got nothin'...unless that's Scofield and Lovano on track 3? 

 

Not Scofield or Lovano...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Ken Dryden said:

Not Scofield or Lovano...

Is it a modern recording at least - like something from the 90s on? That guitar tone is so familiar...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Dub Modal said:

Is it a modern recording at least - like something from the 90s on? That guitar tone is so familiar...

You are in the correct time frame...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally getting to this, Ken.  Sorry about the delay -- I *REALLY* need to retire.

Track 01 - Not my genre, admittedly, but this sounds as if the tempo is beyond the comfort level of the player (the time is a little hitchy).  My guess is a modern player playing in the style.  It’s interesting, but seems to just miss the mark by a bit to my ear.

Track 02 - Billie’s Bounce by a bouncy guitarist.  Maybe Doug Raney?

Track 03 - Variation on a theme, here.  I always think Sonny Rollins when I hear a song with this feel — which is very Don’t Stop The Carnival to my ear.  Tenor out of the Joe school.  This has that late 80s/early 90s feel to me.  Lots of amp effects on the guitar, lots of progression in the recording.  Tenor could well be Joe, but not on his top day.  If not, the guy owes Joe and Sonny lunch.  I’m going to guess it IS Joe, circa  mid-late 80s.  Thinking drummer’s record, but it’s so much a “jazz” guy.  Can’t think of the guy’s name, but he was on the cover of Downbeat in the late 80s.  Hey wait!  There’s a volume button here.  /eyes roll/  Questioning the Joe call, but can’t think of anyone who has his lines down this well.  I’ll stick with Joe.  Liking it better with the volume up.  Don’t think it’s Scofield on guitar, but it could be.  

Track 04 - Definitely a band I don’t know.  This is a whole chunk of the genre I’m ill-informed on.  Basically, the soprano in the sax section, excepting The Jazz Orchestra, is usually a sign it’s somebody I don’t know in this context.  Soprano could be anybody — literally anyone from Bob Wilbur to Jeff Coffin.  Has that polish that leaves me not caring a whole lot.  Impressive musicianship, but sing me a song, bro.  Trumpeter sounds like an older player.  I know Clark Terry does the two-handed, two-horns thing, but it doesn’t sound like him to me.

Track 05 - Nice, Mal Waldron density to those opening chords.  The darkness makes me happy.  Not Mal, though.  Yesterdays, but by the time the theme is stated, it’s kind of lost me.  It felt like it was going somewhere, but this was not what I was hearing.  No guesses.

Track 06 - Along Came Betty.  Interesting arrangment.  Something about the stomping is turning me off.  Otherwise, I like this. Yeah.  That’s really killing it for me.  Just seems… forced.  

Track 07 - Reminds me of something that was on a recent(ish) BFT.  That cut was, I believe, Paul Horn.  This is trying to be a lot of things, most of them very successfully.  Polite enough to be a movie/tv soundtrack, but interesting enough to be enjoyable.  That trumpet player really enjoyed his Miles recordings.  REALLY enjoyed them.  This works in the way the … wait… all bets are off.  Phil Woods. That’s Trane, so it IS Miles.  (Second listen)  Oh, for f***’s sake.  Opening track from this.  Clearly off my game, here.  To finish the truncated thought, I was leaning towards the Danish Radio Big Band.  

Track 08 - Standards I know but not by name.  Cussed iPod syndrome.  Totally unfamiliar with this brass-heavy arrangment.  It works, though.  I want to guess someone like Dave Stryker but it seems older than that.  Could be Kenny Burrell from that period of his that I am not familiar with (CTI forward).

Track 09 - Yeah.  Singing the song along with it, but you think I can remember the f***in’ title?  Egad, getting old sucks.  Mind is saying Pettiford, but can’t recall the title for the life of me.  GAH!

Track 10 - What’s New.  Man, LOVE that tone and that breath.  Got a little Giuffre in there, a little Getz… touch of Zoot.  I know this guy.  That’s Tommy Flanagan on piano — those voicings… so warm.  Nice brush work — telling the story.  OH!  That’s Bobby Jaspar!  Now WONDER those brushes were speaking to me.  It’s from this.  PERFECT use of vibrato.

Track 11 - Oh, hello, bass hook.  Ray Nance.  Okay, BFT, you don’t get me this time — that’s gotta be Abdul-Malik. And it is.  From this.  Been reading William Parker’s Conversations, and there’s a great one with Walter Perkins.  Two names I wouldn’t have associated prior to reading it.  Is it possible Ray Nance was the most soulful person to ever walk the planet?  I think so.

Track 12 - Song is super familiar, but I’m thinking it’s just based on something I know.  Ah… I’m thinking of the tune Curtain Call.  It’s not that, but could be based on it.  I don’t know these guys.

Track 13 - Well, there’s Billy Higgins.  And Harold Land, older.  Thinking this is one of those Playboy Jazz Festival bills.  And There’s Bobby.  That’s Cedar behind him.  Curtis Fuller.  So, I was close, it’s this.  Track 2.  Always loved Land, but never fully appreciated how great he was until I tried to play some of those Hutcherson/Land tunes.  Harold was a baaaaaaaaad man.

Track 14 -  You’d be so nice to come home to… even if you were listening to stringed instruments around a camp fire.  Something to Shout About!  Actually, I would LOVE to be around this campfire.  (Tried to light one this afternoon, but the wind would not cooperate.  I smell like smoke and if I close my eyes, this is the greatest drumless drum circle ever!)  No clue who it is.

Track 15 - Two pianists.  No idea who they are, what it is, or if I like it.  I know I’m not currently in this headspace and it’s stressing the f*** out of me.  Gotta be newer because there are elements of Pullen, but it’s too clean.  Not something I can play for the wife — she’d snap.

Track 16 - More Yesterdays.  Feels like I’m living in the past, here.  Very facile pianist.  No guess.

Track 17 - Guessing this is the same as Track 14.  Snowfall.  Thankfully, nothing but sunlight today.  It’s an odd crossover of folkish and traditional Jazz.  Not sure where I am on it.  Again, could make for the coolest camp fire ever, but for sitting and listening, I’m uncertain.

I had nothing for much of this, but had a sweet spot.  I can't ask for more in a BFT!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, tkeith said:

Always loved Land, but never fully appreciated how great he was until I tried to play some of those Hutcherson/Land tunes.  Harold was a baaaaaaaaad man.

 

Yeah, I tried transcribing one of his solos, late 70s thing, a Bird blues in, in either E or B...I gave up. Those licks in that key on the tenor...it's just not natural!

Unless, of course, you're a baaaaaaaaad man, like Harold Land.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, JSngry said:

Yeah, I tried transcribing one of his solos, late 70s thing, a Bird blues in, in either E or B...I gave up. Those licks in that key on the tenor...it's just not natural!

Unless, of course, you're a baaaaaaaaad man, like Harold Land.

 

Fact.  Tried to play Ursula on a gig once with Tim Webb.  Love the song, but... MAN!  My Dad was in the audience and said, "that's the second-best version of that song I've ever heard"

Tim:  "How many have you heard?"
Dad:  "Just the original and that one."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, tkeith said:

Track 10 - What’s New.  Man, LOVE that tone and that breath.  Got a little Giuffre in there, a little Getz… touch of Zoot.  I know this guy.  That’s Tommy Flanagan on piano — those voicings… so warm.  Nice brush work — telling the story.  OH!  That’s Bobby Jaspar!  Now WONDER those brushes were speaking to me.  It’s from this.  PERFECT use of vibrato.

Thanks for id'ing this tune! On my second listen through this BFT I repeated it like 5 times because I thought it was so good. Searched for every sax player who recorded What's New, even tried to find it in Flanagan's leader dates from back then and could not find it. It was driving me nuts. NO ONE started the song like Jaspar does here. Totally slays this standard. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, tkeith said:

Finally getting to this, Ken.  Sorry about the delay -- I *REALLY* need to retire.

Track 01 - Not my genre, admittedly, but this sounds as if the tempo is beyond the comfort level of the player (the time is a little hitchy).  My guess is a modern player playing in the style.  It’s interesting, but seems to just miss the mark by a bit to my ear.

Track 02 - Billie’s Bounce by a bouncy guitarist.  Maybe Doug Raney?

It is not "Billie's Bounce" nor is the guitarist Doug Raney.

Track 03 - Variation on a theme, here.  I always think Sonny Rollins when I hear a song with this feel — which is very Don’t Stop The Carnival to my ear.  Tenor out of the Joe school.  This has that late 80s/early 90s feel to me.  Lots of amp effects on the guitar, lots of progression in the recording.  Tenor could well be Joe, but not on his top day.  If not, the guy owes Joe and Sonny lunch.  I’m going to guess it IS Joe, circa  mid-late 80s.  Thinking drummer’s record, but it’s so much a “jazz” guy.  Can’t think of the guy’s name, but he was on the cover of Downbeat in the late 80s.  Hey wait!  There’s a volume button here.  /eyes roll/  Questioning the Joe call, but can’t think of anyone who has his lines down this well.  I’ll stick with Joe.  Liking it better with the volume up.  Don’t think it’s Scofield on guitar, but it could be.  

It is not Joe Henderson, nor is John Scofield present.

Track 04 - Definitely a band I don’t know.  This is a whole chunk of the genre I’m ill-informed on.  Basically, the soprano in the sax section, excepting The Jazz Orchestra, is usually a sign it’s somebody I don’t know in this context.  Soprano could be anybody — literally anyone from Bob Wilbur to Jeff Coffin.  Has that polish that leaves me not caring a whole lot.  Impressive musicianship, but sing me a song, bro.  Trumpeter sounds like an older player.  I know Clark Terry does the two-handed, two-horns thing, but it doesn’t sound like him to me.

Track 05 - Nice, Mal Waldron density to those opening chords.  The darkness makes me happy.  Not Mal, though.  Yesterdays, but by the time the theme is stated, it’s kind of lost me.  It felt like it was going somewhere, but this was not what I was hearing.  No guesses.

The song is correctly identified.

 
Track 06 - Along Came Betty.  Interesting arrangment.  Something about the stomping is turning me off.  Otherwise, I like this. Yeah.  That’s really killing it for me.  Just seems… forced.  
 
The song is correctly identified.

Track 07 - Reminds me of something that was on a recent(ish) BFT.  That cut was, I believe, Paul Horn.  This is trying to be a lot of things, most of them very successfully.  Polite enough to be a movie/tv soundtrack, but interesting enough to be enjoyable.  That trumpet player really enjoyed his Miles recordings.  REALLY enjoyed them.  This works in the way the … wait… all bets are off.  Phil Woods. That’s Trane, so it IS Miles.  (Second listen)  Oh, for f***’s sake.  Opening track from this.  Clearly off my game, here.  To finish the truncated thought, I was leaning towards the Danish Radio Big Band.  

Nailed it!

Track 08 - Standards I know but not by name.  Cussed iPod syndrome.  Totally unfamiliar with this brass-heavy arrangment.  It works, though.  I want to guess someone like Dave Stryker but it seems older than that.  Could be Kenny Burrell from that period of his that I am not familiar with (CTI forward).

It is a standard but the guitarist is not Dave Stryker or Kenny Burrell. The guitarist is also not the leader or arranger.

Track 09 - Yeah.  Singing the song along with it, but you think I can remember the f***in’ title?  Egad, getting old sucks.  Mind is saying Pettiford, but can’t recall the title for the life of me.  GAH!

It is an Oscar Pettiford composition.

Track 10 - What’s New.  Man, LOVE that tone and that breath.  Got a little Giuffre in there, a little Getz… touch of Zoot.  I know this guy.  That’s Tommy Flanagan on piano — those voicings… so warm.  Nice brush work — telling the story.  OH!  That’s Bobby Jaspar!  Now WONDER those brushes were speaking to me.  It’s from this.  PERFECT use of vibrato.

Correct!

Track 11 - Oh, hello, bass hook.  Ray Nance.  Okay, BFT, you don’t get me this time — that’s gotta be Abdul-Malik. And it is.  From this.  Been reading William Parker’s Conversations, and there’s a great one with Walter Perkins.  Two names I wouldn’t have associated prior to reading it.  Is it possible Ray Nance was the most soulful person to ever walk the planet?  I think so.

Correct!

 

2 hours ago, tkeith said:

Track 12 - Song is super familiar, but I’m thinking it’s just based on something I know.  Ah… I’m thinking of the tune Curtain Call.  It’s not that, but could be based on it.  I don’t know these guys.

Track 13 - Well, there’s Billy Higgins.  And Harold Land, older.  Thinking this is one of those Playboy Jazz Festival bills.  And There’s Bobby.  That’s Cedar behind him.  Curtis Fuller.  So, I was close, it’s this.  Track 2.  Always loved Land, but never fully appreciated how great he was until I tried to play some of those Hutcherson/Land tunes.  Harold was a baaaaaaaaad man.

Correct!

Track 14 -  You’d be so nice to come home to… even if you were listening to stringed instruments around a camp fire.  Something to Shout About!  Actually, I would LOVE to be around this campfire.  (Tried to light one this afternoon, but the wind would not cooperate.  I smell like smoke and if I close my eyes, this is the greatest drumless drum circle ever!)  No clue who it is.

Correct song title.

Track 15 - Two pianists.  No idea who they are, what it is, or if I like it.  I know I’m not currently in this headspace and it’s stressing the f*** out of me.  Gotta be newer because there are elements of Pullen, but it’s too clean.  Not something I can play for the wife — she’d snap.

I couldn't play this song for my wife as well.

Track 16 - More Yesterdays.  Feels like I’m living in the past, here.  Very facile pianist.  No guess.

Track 17 - Guessing this is the same as Track 14.  Snowfall.  Thankfully, nothing but sunlight today.  It’s an odd crossover of folkish and traditional Jazz.  Not sure where I am on it.  Again, could make for the coolest camp fire ever, but for sitting and listening, I’m uncertain.

Correct song title...

I had nothing for much of this, but had a sweet spot.  I can't ask for more in a BFT!

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, I have not done BFTs for a long time, so not sure about the current etiquette. I am focusing more on my impressions of the music without any preconceptions rather than IDing the performers (which I am horrible at anyway). Typing as I am listening. 


1.    I am totally ignorant about this type of music. Is this ragtime? It is quite limited in range, repetitive and predictable. These are variations rather than improvisations – all going in circles and by what sounds to me as pretty stringent rules. Is this a piano roll by chance? I am familiar with Nancarrow piano roll recordings and they have a similar sort of cascading sound. It’s only three minutes long, but frankly I am bored by the end. But this is cute, let’s leave it at that.

2.    To begin with, this is really well recorded. A virtuoso performance, obviously. Very interesting what’s being done with the “bass” part. A forced “A night in Tunisia” quote – why? – totally unnecessary… Extremely well played, but quite show-offish and not very deep. Does not sound very spontaneous with some obvious stock phrases – I can imagine this being played exactly the same way on every concert.

3.    Tenor sounds very familiar; I am sure I am going to be embarrassed when the name is revealed. I hear Rollins, I hear Dewey Redman. The drummer is extremely annoying – such an ugly sound. Silly drum solo. The guitar is OK, nothing too interesting for me. But the tenor I like. Is this Jerry Bergonzi by chance? 

4.    Oh, big band. Not something I listen to. Vey nice drums and bass. Bass guitar, right? Is this a soprano or alto playing the solo? In any case, I like it. Very pretty sound. Trombone solo - very nice. Trumpet duo – cute. Is this the same person playing two instruments? Or one instrument with and without a mute? Nice arrangement, very tight paying. The problem I have with this stuff is that the soloists have 20 seconds for a solo and they seem to be intent on cramming all their (admirable) instrument knowledge into this space (the audience loves it, obviously). My main interest is free improvisation, so this sounds very pre-determined and confined to my ears. I am not sure how much improvisatory spontaneity there is – or can be – in mainstream big band. Still, don’t get my wrong, I found the track very enjoyable.   

5.    I like how this starts. Good use of space, quite dramatic. A lot of reverb – but it works well for the music. Don’t know the pianist, but he/she sounds European – with Debussy influences and all that. Oh, guitar at 1:55 – did not expect that, thought this would be a piano solo. And this turns out to be “Yesterdays”. OK, generally I don’t like piano and guitar together – the instruments tend to crown each other out, and this is exactly what is happening here. There is too much piano behind the guitar, really not a good support from the pianist. I like the guitar sound (and in general, the guitarist’s playing), but it does not work well with the reverbing piano. I like both musicians individually – a lot, but this is a failure as a duet, as far as I am concerned.  

6.    String quartet. I thought this was bad. The tempo is too slow. The arrangement is boring with the parts played mostly in unison (some counterpoint would have been nice here). Stiff, feet stamping notwithstanding. 

7.    The arrangement of Jitterbug Waltz is very interesting – some good composer thinking. I love the tempo changes. I bet this is European too. With flutes and harps it could have easily been an overkill, but it is very tastefully done here. Trumpet solo - come on, is this Miles Davis or what (would be very embarrassing if it is not him)? If it is, I never heard this! Alto solo OK. Tenor - this has got to be Coltrane. What’s going on here, is this some Gil Evans thing? I loved this one! OK, I did a research and identified the album, not sure I even knew about it. Will be listening to this one for sure.      

8.    Pleasant polite playing, does not do much for me. The guitar solo is cute, but quite bland. Piano solo is by-the-numbers. The big band arrangement is boring. 

9.    I love the bass and have more than 20 solo bass records in my collection. But I did not like this one at all. For one thing, the bass sound is horrible. The bass does not breath, it’s all plastic. It’s mostly played on the upper register… Boy, these long notes around 1:03-1:07 are ugly to my ears… The few low notes that are allowed to linger a bit are such a welcome respite. Obviously, a virtuoso musician, but I really did not like this one.  

Thank you Ken for putting this together. Will listen to the rest of the tracks later today, if I have time. 
 

 

 

Edited by Д.Д.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

10. Such a sweet tenor sound. The solo is a bit calculated and safe. He is repeating the same licks in the first and second solo. But good stuff. I don’t know who that is, I am pretty sure I don’t have him his music in my collection. The piano solo is generic.  


11. Oh, love that bass sound. The groove is nice. Is it oud comping? The flute is sweet. Oh, and cello too. Violin is on a primitive side, but quite effective – is this Michael White? Sweet, reserved drumming (brushes?). Good piano solo – simple, but interesting. Oh, and we get an oud solo too (not going anywhere, but it’s OK). All very well recorded too. Has this 60’s vibe to it. Good stuff.


12. Ha, this cornetist (and occasional semi-decent crooner) I can actually ID with certainty, even though I have not heard this particular album. I saw him live in his trio with Mark Helias and Bill Goodwin – they are an excellent group (what an inspired – and non-obvious – choice of sidemen!). Great fluidity, sweet sound, fast thinking. I love it. The pianist (new to me) is a good match – such speed and precision. Looks like I identified what album this is, putting it into my Spotify favorites.

13. Man, what’s up with that plastic bass sound again?! Is this Joe Henderson on tenor? Or Harold Land? In any case, the solo is OK. I don’t like the drummer, sounds like Billy Higgins. Did not like this one too much, generic early 70’s stuff. Bobby Hutcherson? I am not too familiar with his music. 

14. This is cute. No improvisations really. Sounds like what they would play in restaurants. Not something I would be interested in listening to, but this does not disturb the conversation.

15. Oh, two pianists, interesting. I like the tune, a lot of fun. Wish the recording was less muddy. Is this Riley / Tippett? I have their Bern concert on FMR for 10 years or so, and I think I never listened to it.   

16. “Yesterdays” again. Sounds like Jaki Byard to me. Joyful stuff. Enjoyable.  

17. More pleasant background music to facilitate digestion and light conversation of restaurant patrons. 

Ken, thank you for compiling this. I enjoyed it.           

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.