MartyJazz

BFT #28 - Disc One: DISCUSSION

87 posts in this topic

I was hoping for more check-ins from the overseas contingent, but what are you gonna do? Overall, 2/3 have reported in, so I want to hear from you. Say whatever....

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Well....I still have a lot more listening to do, but I did get the first track. Here's early impressions of some tracks:

Track One: I recognized Barney Bigard, Juan Tizol and Cootie Williams, figured it was a small group Ellington date, checked my collection and came up with "Jubilesta". Nice side !

Track Two: Can't ID anyone yet, but I really feel like I should recognize somebody.

Track Four: Modern recording of a Django influenced guitarist.

Track eight: Is that a Fletcher Henderson track? I know I've heard it before.

Track Thirteen sounds like Basie.

Edit to add: Thanks Marty - It's a really enjoyable set and I know it's going to get me listening more to some people I haven't listened enough too.l

Edited by Harold_Z

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I MUST buy the disc Track 2 came from. Love it.

Will check in with my guesses later.

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I liked every minute of this disc.

1. Tune is familiar but I don’t know what it is and can’t identify any of the players. Sounds like Ellington I should think. Reveled in this one - propulsive.

2. The baritone player sounds very like Pepper Adams but I don’t know the tune. Having listened several times (because I like it), but no names appear from the mists as to the other players. I can’t connect to anyone who is often found in PA’s company.

3. Now here’s one I know. Got the 1968 CD not too long ago together with another from 1971 by the pianist (who composed this tune) but was struck by the change in approach over a mere three years. Hampton Hawes "Blues for Bud". Track 8.

4. Don’t know anyone here or the tune.

5. Very familiar – no trouble identifying this. A favourite trumpeter and baritone player. I can’t say I listen to the tenor player all that much but no complaints on this album. Pianist – can’t get enough of him. Dizzy Reece, "Asia Minor". Track 4.

6. Liked it but no idea who or what.

7. Know the tune well from album Brother John by Elvin with Pat LaBarbera on tenor. Dameron’s “Whatever Possessed Me”. No inspiration as to the players though.

8. No ideas.

9. Don’t know the tune. Dwight Dickerson’s name comes to mind, mainly because of the moaning and groaning going on.

10. Sounds like west coast but I can’t think of a name for the tune even though it is rather familiar. Perhaps Niehaus and Nimitz, alto and baritone.

11. Another one I know well. Blue Mitchell, "Blue's Moods", Track 2.

12. Nice interplay. No ideas.

13. Is it Basie? Don’t know.

14. Shelly Manne, "Perk Up", Track 7. Mike Wofford’s "Bleep", sounding like a Monk composition I thought.

15. Another one I know, from “Fabulous Fats” album. Track 9.

16. No idea.

17. Don’t know the tune or the players but looking forward to finding out as I would like this album. There’s a feel a little like some of the Ronnie Ross things I’ve got in the ensemble passages.

18. Clueless again.

Thanks a lot for a very engrossing disc, Martin.

For those I think I know, I tried putting in links to AMG but wouldn't work so I've put the names. I suppose anyone who doesn't want to know doesn't have to look.

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Ok, these are the notes I made listening to disc 1 first time through (so it’s fairly rambling, filled with abbreviations to aid my memory and littered with errors). I have to say I have no idea on most of it, although I’ve nailed two tracks for sure. I’ll rethink these responses when I have another listen.

1: Wailin’ clarinet. Mellow trombone. Growling trumpet. Nice. No idea.

2: Trumpet, saxophone section: alto, bari, tenor. Not much vibrato on tp, cool toned tenor. West coasters? Mid 60s. Latin & Spanish influences and modal approach to chords. Pepper Adams on bari? Not much of an idea on this.

3: Mid- Late 60s sound. Piano trio. Pianist fleet fingered but occasionally seems tentative. Interesting, mainly because I can’t get a handle on the pianist’s style but it feels a little directionless on first hearing.

4: Guitar, p, b, d. Date? Possibly mid 50s? Guitarist has plenty chops, almost distorted sound. Some of the phrasing and note choices reminded me of Django but on electric. Someone Django influenced. Nicely constructed compact piano solo.

5: Oh! I know this. What is it? Oh yeah… it's from this album. Excellent album. Good compositions and fine soloing all round.

6: First thought was Basie. That chugging rhythm guitar sounds like Freddie Green. The piano is light and swinging but there’s more notes than I’m used to hearing from the Count. Jury’s out.

7: Warm trumpet, largeish group, baritone sax, is that a French horn? The drummer’s doing the ‘Philly lick’: 1, 2, 3, click. Cool. Sounds kinda familiar but I can’t pinpoint it. Lots of triplet-y runs from the trumpeter. Uh, wait… Interesting tenor, much more ‘modern’ sounding than the rest of the group. Almost has a sound like Sam Rivers or John Gilmore but in a kind of West Coast post-bop setting. Now I’m confused.

8: Boogie woogie piano intro. Big band. Swingin’!. Piano’s more bluesy now, still got hints of boogie in the left hand. Cool tricky little drum lick. Two trumpet solos? It changes hands after 16 bars. Late 30s/ early 40s? No thoughts on personnel.

9: Vibes, p, b, d. Fastish setting on the vibrato, quite ‘glassy’ sounding. Reminds me a little of Walt Dickerson, in terms of sound and those short, choppy, repeated figures, but less avant. Got that early 60s open/ modal feel to it. Vibes and piano both playing on the edges of tonality. Some Tynerisms from the piano, but it’s not him.

10: Saxophone section. Boppish head. Sounds like a contrafact of ‘You Can Depend on Me’. Again, a West-Coastish sound. Baritone: sounds like Mulligan. Alto: boppish, ornithological. Some nice backing and breaks from the horns, again sounds like Mulligan’s writing.

11: Trumpet, p, b, d. Trumpet’s playing some familiar licks. I should know who that is. Probably the piano too. Mid 60s?

12: Vibes, tenor, alto, b, d. Borderline avant but melodic and thoughtful. Gradually intensifying. Bit enigmatic, this one, but interesting. I’d be interested to know the reason for its inclusion.

13: Hm. Got a Basie-ish ‘Kansas City’ feel to it, maybe with a nod to early bop. Tenor sounds familiar… wait, two tenors? Oh yeah, there’s some lick swapping. They take a chorus each, then three choruses trading fours. Nice trading of ideas between them. Not quite a tenor battle but there’s some friendly joshing going on. On the last chorus, the 1st tenor opens with a phrase which the 2nd tenor picks up on, then shifts chromatically. Can’t place them. I’m gonna kick myself. Ah… is the second, fuller toned player Lucky Thompson?

14: Early 60s post-bop edging toward something freer. Alto, trombone (?), trumpet, p, b, d. No idea on the trumpet. Was that a Roy Haynes lick in the drum solo? Occasional Monk-isms from the piano. The tune’s quite Monkish too so I’d guess it’s the pianist’s date or he at least wrote this. Alto sounds familiar; tart sound, slightly sharp, almost Jackie-ish in spots.

15: Ah! Instantly familiar. Took me a minute to click but it’s this guy with this fella and the track's on here, disc 2, track 5. Wonderful trumpet playing. Great stuff. How many will get the pianist on this one?

16: Moody intro. Big band. Late 30s/ early 40s. Very ‘arranged’. Almost like a pastiche of a jazz dance band from a 1940s movie. Not doing much for me.

17: Hmm. Hard to date this one. The tenor’s strong and edgy. Trumpet slips in and out of some ‘outside’ licks. The baritone has a gruff edge, reminiscent of Chaloff; I’m guessing too late for him. Really no idea on this.

18: Little bit of everything from the pianist. Made me think of Jaki Byard. Trombone: not sure. He doesn’t really take off. Alto either. It has a whiff of Mingus about it, though it’s obviously not him. Hm. Early 60s? Worth it for that spiky piano, kind of tailed off after that.

Listening to disc 2 right now!

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Aaaaaack! Must. Stop. Looking. At. Other. Responses.

This is a terrific BFT, Marty--thanks for putting it together and sending it!

Just having my first listen now--sounds great. I LOVE track #2!

More thoughts to come...but for now, thanks!

:tup

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I won't be around this weekend to post, but I'll be listening. One comment: that guitar! Holy smokes!

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Well, here we go. I’ve listened all the way through in the car, and am listening on earphones a second time while writing these notes. :w

1. My first thought as this starts is Duke Ellington, late 30’s, and the clarinet seems to be Barney Bigard. The smoky trombone must be Lawrence Brown, but I get bogged down with the trumpet. It might be Cootie, but I’m not sure, and I’m on the fence as to whether this is Duke, especially since I like to think I know my early Duke, and I don’t recognize this. I’d expect more written passages if this were Duke, and aside from the subdued background riffing, this one is almost all solo work.

2. Are we jumping ahead 30 years with another Duke track? Ellingtonian at the beginning, but the tenor is unfamiliar. Nice tango feeling. I think this Barry Harris from one of the mid-1960’s Prestige albums, “Luminescence” or “Bullseye”. Kenny Dorham (tp), Junior Cook? (ts), Pepper Adams (bari)

3. Didn’t have a clue on first listen, found the drums a tad overrecorded, but on second listen I think it might be early Don Friedman on piano, with Joe Hunt on drums, from one of the Riverside albums, possibly “A Day In the City”. Very tasty.

4. The guitarist sounds an awful lot like Django, although until recently I wouldn’t have thought that Django had ever played so modern. A couple of months ago I picked up a Django LP on which Django plays with young modern musicians including Martial Solal, and it was good! Might this be from those sessions?

5. This opens with a typical Horace Silver intro, although it becomes obvious pretty quickly that this isn’t Horace. I like the bari player, but I can’t recognize him. The solos are frustratingly short – I’d like everybody to stretch out a little more. The tenor and trumpet are tantalizingly familiar! I’m gonna kick myself when I find out who this is!

6. This one had me stumped at first – clearly a 1940’s big band feature piece for the pianist, but then I think I got it: “The Moose”, Charlie Barnet’s band featuring young Dodo Marmarosa.

7. This sounds a lot like Tadd Dameron, possibly from “The Magic Touch” on Riverside? Joe Wilder (tp – beautiful!), I seem to remember that Jimmy Heath was the tenor on TMT, but this sounds like Charlie Rouse to me. And presumably the drummer is Philly Joe.

8. A nice 1930’s swing band with a stride piano intro. Claude Hopkins? Two trumpets, the second guy a high note man! Or might this be Chick Webb’s band – nice drumming.

9. Oh, this is so familiar. I think this is Dave Pike, can hear him moaning in the background. Is this Bill Evans – can this be from “Pike’s Peak”? The drummer doesn’t seem to be completely comfortable with the waltz time, a little stilted. A nice track, nonetheless.

10. Bari sounds like Serge Chaloff, but I can’t place the session. Maybe “Boston Blowup”, with Boots Mussulli on alto. Nice writing and ensemble playing, reminiscent of Woody’s second Herd.

11. Again, a familiar side. It kills me when I know it but I don’t know it! Blue Mitchell? A fine trumpet player, whoever he is. I think the bassist is Sam Jones. This must be an old Riverside album. I could guess any number of pianists, but no names are jumping out.

12. An early avant garde group, Mingus influence. Two altos – might this be Prince Lasha & Sonny Simmons? And while I’m sticking my neck out here – Bobby Hutcherson?

13. If this ain’t Basie, the pianist certainly took his Basie pills that morning. Two smoking tenor players, one of them might be Wardell Gray. This probably dates from the time that Basie was leading a small group in the early 1950’s.

14. I’m wondering if this might be the Jazz Epistles from South Africa. Dollar Brand (piano - very Monkish), Hugh Masakela (trumpet), Kippi Moeketsi (alto), Louis Moholo (drums)?

15. Well, I knew this one right away! One of my all time favorites! Howard McGhee & Fats Navarro! Can’t remember if the title is “The Skunk” or “Boperation”. I love this session. A masterpiece!

16. Oh yes, another favorite – Artie Shaw, “The Maid With the Flaccid Air”, written by the great Eddie Sauter. Such a treat to enjoy this while driving home from work! Such beautiful writing, and impeccably played! I know we share an admiration for Artie Shaw, Marty.

17. No guesses on this - a pleasant performance, again stingy on the solo work. You wish that the musicians would be given more opportunity to dig in.

18. I think this is Marion Brown from his “Three For Shepp” album on Impulse. A little tongue in cheek here. Grachan Moncur (trombone). I’m inclined to guess Jaki Byard on piano, but I seem to recall that Dave Burrell was the pianist on this session.

Some very fine selections, Marty. In several instance I was frustrated that the producer hadn’t given the musicians more opportunities to stretch out, but that’s the record biz!

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Tracks 1, 6, 8 stood out for me, hey I like simple catchy stuff. Tracks 14 and 18 remind me some Thelonious tunes but not too sure. Track 12 was pretty interesting; it gets a little intense towards the end. Looking forward to finding out who played on track 4, that guitar is smoking. I don't think it could be django, but i know so little when it comes to this stuff. Nice selection of tracks, I am still batting 000% on recognizing songs when it comes to these things.

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Some very quick IDs and quite a few good guesses, some interesting totally wrong ones as well. Great input and I'll hand out a few kudos now to Stereojack (I was afraid of him - he's my contemporary AND he has a record store) and Tooter. Rosco and Harold Z have also hit a bullseye here and there.

Keep 'em coming. :tup

Edited by MartyJazz

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1. a very steady swinger to start things out. The guys are obviously having a lot of fun with this. Some of the lush supporting horn arrangements remind me of Ellington. The clarinet does not really ring a bell. In spots the tune reminds me of Bei mir bist du schön.

2. KD is my guess and Pepper too. And the tune rings some LOUD bells. Bull's Eye! Got it! The album never struck me as very strong, but damn if this isn't a great tune. Need to pull that disk out again. Thanks for the prod!

3. late 60s piano trio. Spiffy stuff! Reminiscent of Tyner at times (not him). No guesses, but much appreciation for the flashy performance.

4. Djangoesque geetarr, plenty doubt it is him. More likely a hommage. I like it.

5. drats, pretty sure I know this one or at least half of the players. Especially the trumpeteer sounds more than a tad familiar. He brings in specks of KD and Lee, pretty unique that. The baritone might be Payne. I'll slap my head when the answer is revealed fersure.

6. woa! cool ivories! the horns are too loud at times, but this is great.

7. tune sounds familiarly Dameronian. The trumpet is killing me, sure I should know, but my mind simply draws a blank. None of the remainder is helpful in ringing any bells either. Who's that tenor then? Beautiful tune and great pick. (drats!)

8. I enjoyed this a lot but cannot wager any guesses. Good fun this!

9. humhummmmhummmm... shaddapwillya! sounds like Dave Pike. Love the playing and the tune but sadly cannot really enjoy for all the out of tune humming.

10. Luvly. Chaloff maybe, very agile. Alto does some great stuff as well, likely one of those West Coast boppers I never got around to checking out. Good good stuff.

11. May be Blue M. Damn fine rhythm section. Wynton on piano maybe? Simply a great tune with enough to shake a wild booty and enough to sip a serious drink.

12. ding dong! who's there? sounds like Hutcherson and two altos. The alto on the left at times hits a tone that's so close to Dolphy's that it sends shivers down me spine. Not much that fits here if serendipity and AMG hadn't pointed to the prince and the sonny. This album has been on my radar.

13. must be Basie, harrr. Two tenors fighting a friendly battle. Tate & Thompson maybe.

14. judging by the solo, this must be the drummer's date ;) Interesting Monkisms (also in the composition) combined with Guaraldiqua runs on the piano solo. Familiar trumpet and alto, but you can kick me in the shin and I wouldn't throw up any names. This is nice stuff. Just that, nothing more, nothing less, but at times that's better than all the rest!

15. Howard and Fats on Blue Note. One of those that make me go all harrrrrrrrrrr!!!! I usually lose track on who's who once they start their final exchanges. Fantastic!

16. nice, nice stuff. Very dancey, nicely light. Clarinet towards the end is so sadly dryly real, it must be Artie.

17. damn! good stuff this is. no clue whatsoever. great tenor, familiar trumpet, grand baritone. This has some of that yurpeen sound to it; the rhythm section sounds thoroughly american though. Kick me in the shins once more.

18. Spooks! That piano solo is engraved. Grand stuff!

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Ya done real good, couw. Man, that track 15 turned out to be a real freebie for all concerned. Well, I guess it should be easy....classic bebop and great trumpet playing.

Those tenors on #13 are driving some of you nuts. Good!

Anyway, love the input and glad that at the very least, overall you all seem to like this disc.

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A very nice compilation, track 12 was the only tune with zero appeal. Unfortunately, not a lot of names popping out at me as I listened though:

1) Bit before my time - was this Marty's first jazz 78? Or maybe a tribute to dear old Dad who introduced him to jazz? ;)

3) Stanley Cowell? Got that late 60s-70s vibe.

6) Basie.

7) KD on trumpet?

9) Sounds to me like a more straightahead CTI track with Bags.

14) Isn't this a Monk tune?

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A very nice compilation, track 12 was the only tune with zero appeal. 

It only hurt for a little while though. Or did you move to track 13 as soon as they went outside the box? :P

Anyway, enjoyed your input. Zero score but I'm glad that overall, you liked the compilation.

Edited by MartyJazz

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I'm still guessing -- and believe me that is what it is -- so I'm not going to look at any of the responses just yet.

I just want to say that this is one of my favorite all around Blindfold Tests to date.

Thanks!

Alejandro

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First off, many thanks to Marty for compiling this fantastic BFT. Your efforts are greatly appreciated!

Blindfold Test #28 Compiled by MartyJazz

Disc One

1. No idea who, but this is exactly the sort of track I love from this era. I'd even say it's funky.

2. Trumpet makes me think Freddie Hubbard. Infectious and instantly endearing, I'd buy this.

3. McCoy Tyner & Elvin Jones?

4. Joe Pass comes to mind, and that's good to these ears.

5. Another one that immediately grabs me, like track 2. Inspiring.

6. The horns make me think of old TV jingles. Nice piano. No guess.

7. Sonny Rollins?

8. Fun, but no chance I'd know this!

9. Another must buy/must have/must play repeatedly. Bobby Hutcherson? I think I've heard the tune but I'm certain I'd remember this version if I had it. Excellent.

10. Man, what an intro, I'm hooked. The audio quality and soloing throws me a bit, at first I thought this was older. Now I don't know when to place it. Sonny Rollins?

11. Tight. The bass player is on fire. I'm trying to spot the trumpet...Lee Morgan? I'd buy this.

12. Sonny Rollins? ;) I dig the vibes here.

13. Slim Gaillard?

14. Art Taylor drums? Lex Humphries? Something in the drums made me think of Coltrane's Giant Steps. More great bass work, and another album I'd gladly add to the shelves.

15. Fats Navarro and Tadd Dameron come to mind here.

16. Another that I'd have no hope of guessing. The piano playing here is different, somehow not what I'd expect in this context. I don't know any famous clarinet players...great stuff.

17. Sonny Rollins?

18. There's something irreverent to this one, the way the everyone bangs around and lets it go wild. Bit of a bull in a China shop. Fun, a good way to close the disc. No idea.

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I've listened to disc one. I promised myself that I'd give each disc two listens and then post my comments, as I didn't want to make myself crazy trying to figure out possibilities. I have also purposely avoided looking at any previous posts, so as to make it a true blindfold test. Anyway, here goes.

Before I say anything, I'd like to thank Marty for all the the thought and work that he put into this, and also for making the whole thing interesting and enjoyable. After my first listen to disc one, I had the thought that if this had been a radio program I'd heard for the first time, I'd definitely by back for more.

A second thought - this blindfold test - disc one anyway (haven't hit disc two yet) - could have been entitled "Sort Cuts". 18 tracks in 80 minutes!

I was able to detect six of the tracks as things in my collection, so I'll go with those first:

#4 - When this began, I thought that the guitarist was influenced by a well known guitarist. Then I realized that the guitarist was that well known guitarist - recorded late in his career and playing a different kind of guitar.

#9 - The vibist is one of my favorites. He began recording in the early '60s and recorded into the '80s. He hasn't recorded in a number of years. This is a track from one of his early 60's records.

#11 - The trumpeter was not overlooked, but perhaps not given all of the attention that he deserved. He recorded as a leader for two of the major jazz labels in the 1960's. The tune was written by a tenor saxophonist who disappeared from the scene after too short a time. His one record as leader also contained this tune, and when the record was reissued, one of the sideman, who was more well known, was credited as the leader.

#12 - These guys are thought of as avante-guardists. If more people heard this, they might be regarded differently - just as good musicians (not that so called avant-garde musicians weren't and aren't good musicians). The drummer is one of my favorites - best known for his playing with a musician who was associated with the at least one of the two leaders.

#15 - Two well known bop trumpeters. When I listen to this, I tend to enjoy the also sax solo (by a man who died at a young age) more than the trumpets. (Not knocking the trumpets, but the relaxed alto solo makes a nice contrast with the trumpet fireworks - perhaps the relaxed quality of the altoist's solo stems from the fact that he didn't feel that he had to compete. It sounds to me as if the trumpets felt that way.)

#18 - Bought this when it came out (1967?) and still have it. The alto player is the leader. Great tune - the composer wrote a lot of fine tunes. He never recorded this one (as far as I know). I'd like to hear him do it someday.

Now for the hard stuff - the ones I didn't recognize:

#1 - I liked this a lot. The soprano player (sounds like soprano to me, anyway) has listened to Sidney Bechet. Maybe it is Bechet. Liked the tromponist also. I'm assuming that these are older players - if they happen to be revivalists, they're damn good at it.

#2 - Nice feel to the tune and to the solos coming out of it. Good tenor player, thoughtful trumpet solo, lyrical baritone solo (not the most common thing). If I don't already have this record, I'll probably buy it. Same goes for #1.

#3 - McCoy influenced pianist, but with a lighter feel - if I had to guess, Joe Bonner came to mind. Not my favorite piano style, but ok.

#5 - Another trumpet/tenor bari group. Liked the arrangement. The tenor player sounded like he was the only soloist who was fully into playing on this tune.

#6 - Basie? Just going by the rhythm section and some of the piano sound. The piano was busier than I expect from Basie, though.

#7 - Nice arrangement to create a big sound from a few instruments. Other than that, it didn't grab me.

#8 - The only track that I didn't enjoy - sounded like a forced attempt to create excitement. The players are probably good players, but not here for me.

#10 - A West coast session? Nice solos - another I'd buy.

#13 - A Basie tune. I'm terrible with tune names - even with Bird or Monk tunes that I can hum along with, I often don't know the titles. I didn't know if this was Pres and if it was, who else it was. Nice, but too short.

#14 - No idea, but interesting. The pianist captured some of Monk's voicings and some of his rhythmic sense. Liked the trumpet.

#16 - One of my blind spots is big bands. On first listen, the arrangment sounded like it was merely clever. On second listen, it grew on me. I've never heard Claude Thornhill, but, for no real reason, I thought that maybe this might be what one of his bands might sound like. Whoever it is, I believe I'd be interested in hearing more.

#17 - The drummer caught my ear when I first started listening to this. Then I picked up on the bassist and then the pianist. The rhythm section interested me more than the horns. Liked the piano solo.

OK - now that I've laid out my thoughts (and no doubt exhibited my ignorance more than once) I can read what other posters have heard and uncovered.

Then on to disc two.

Thanks again, Marty!

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Second thoughts after reading others' comments:

If #1 is Ellington, I feel like a dummy.

I have #5 in my collection, but I think I've only listened to it it once so Idon't feel too bad about that one.

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I started making some notes at the house; took the discs to work, and left them there. So here's what I've got so far:

This BFT is so enjoyable, it makes me forget how badly these all have me stumped!

Track 1: Sounds like Artie Shaw’s Gramercy Five, without the celeste.

Track 2: Nice groove. No clue as to the trumpet player or the tenor, but I love the melody! I could ride this groove for a while; I am really diggin’ this cha-cha-cha beat! No clue on the bari sax, either.

Track 3: No clue here, either. Wish I had more to add than that!

Track 4: I dunno. Tal Farlow, maybe?

Track 5: Stereo separation suggests some kind of RVG recording. I want to say Byrd/Adams, maybe guesting on someone else’s record. No, that ain’t Pepper; this guy doesn’t possess the slashing soloing for which Pepper was famous! And that DEFINITELY ain’t Donald Byrd. The drums sound like Art Taylor. Maybe it’s his Wailers? Don’t know, but I sure like it! And there’s a tenor buried in there! This sounds like it could’ve EASILY fit on Byrd in Hand.

Track 6: GOTS to be Basie. GOTS to be Freddie Green! When and where, I have no clue, and I don’t care. Wonder if it’s from America’s Number One Band? Shows you how much I listen to THAT set! :blush: Music this good should be listened to at least ten times a day! :excited:

Track 7: Nice! Has that Riverside sound to it. Sounds like something arranged by Tadd Dameron in the late 50’s or early 60’s. No wait!!! I’ll bet this is one of those Jimmy Heath Sextet sessions with Freddie Hubbard! DAMN, I need to get those discs. Again, music that should be listened to at least ten times a day!

Track 8: No clue. Shame on me for not knowing this one. More Basie? That’d be alright with me!

Track 9: Lem Winchester? I love this modal vamp! Could ride this for hours! On second thought, this sounds to me like Johnny Lytle.

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I've listened to disc one. I promised myself that I'd give each disc two listens and then post my comments, as I didn't want to make myself crazy trying to figure out possibilities. I have also purposely avoided looking at any previous posts, so as to make it a true blindfold test. Anyway, here goes.

Before I say anything, I'd like to thank Marty for all the the thought and work that he put into this, and also for making the whole thing interesting and enjoyable. After my first listen to disc one, I had the thought that if this had been a radio program I'd heard for the first time, I'd definitely by back for more.

A second thought - this blindfold test - disc one anyway (haven't hit disc two yet) - could have been entitled "Sort Cuts". 18 tracks in 80 minutes!

You are very much welcome, Paul. I did enjoy compiling this disc and did very much want to program some diversity to maintain interest. As for the high number of cuts, I prefer that BFTs in general should keep 'em coming. There is no track over 8 minutes on either of the two discs and most are safely below that limit.

In any event, I really enjoyed your comments concerning the 6 tracks you knew. Not once did you name any names nor post any links but you left no doubt, in my mind at least, that you nailed those tracks. And thanks especially for cluing me on track #11, to an alternative version of that blues by a tenor player that I had forgotten about and to the trumpeter led date that I indeed have on LP.

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I've listened to disc one. I promised myself that I'd give each disc two listens and then post my comments, as I didn't want to make myself crazy trying to figure out possibilities. I have also purposely avoided looking at any previous posts, so as to make it a true blindfold test. Anyway, here goes.

Before I say anything, I'd like to thank Marty for all the the thought and work that he put into this, and also for making the whole thing interesting and enjoyable. After my first listen to disc one, I had the thought that if this had been a radio program I'd heard for the first time, I'd definitely by back for more.

A second thought - this blindfold test - disc one anyway (haven't hit disc two yet) - could have been entitled "Sort Cuts". 18 tracks in 80 minutes!

You are very much welcome, Paul. I did enjoy compiling this disc and did very much want to program some diversity to maintain interest. As for the high number of cuts, I prefer that BFTs in general should keep 'em coming. There is no track over 8 minutes on either of the two discs and most are safely below that limit.

In any event, I really enjoyed your comments concerning the 6 tracks you knew. Not once did you name any names nor post any links but you left no doubt, in my mind at least, that you nailed those tracks. And thanks especially for cluing me on track #11, to an alternative version of that blues by a tenor player that I had forgotten about and to the trumpeter led date that I indeed have on LP.

I recognized that clue, and based on the comments so far, I have quite a few tracks from this BFT in my collection, and no excuse for not recognizing them. :(

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I started making some notes at the house; took the discs to work, and left them there. So here's what I've got so far:

This BFT is so enjoyable, it makes me forget how badly these all have me stumped!

Glad you find it a joy to listen to. Some of the answers will surprise you when you either wait for me to post them or look at some earlier posts, but I could understand what was behind your guesses in quite a few instances. You made a good start on track #7 but then digressed elsewhere. Thanks very much for your input. I was looking forward to your comments and hope to see some more re the rest of the disc.

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I recognized that clue, and based on the comments so far, I have quite a few tracks from this BFT in my collection, and no excuse for not recognizing them.  :(

I know you do own a few of what I programmed and what's more I'm certain you have at least one of the CDs that I used on Disc Two. Hope that doesn't get you a little more crazed. :crazy:

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man marty these were some GREAT disks! i am a lousy guesser so all i am going to say for now is thanks for the hard work!

i can't wait to see the answers 'cause i gotta buy some of these puppies! :)

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