mjzee

Bob Dylan corner

858 posts in this topic

4 minutes ago, JSngry said:

Taken with or taken in by? :g

Either way, a quintessentially American place to be...and yet we love!

Both, of course! 

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A quintessentially American place to be!

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2 hours ago, felser said:

My apologies if this has been discussed in the past - what do people consider to be the essential books about Dylan?  I just finished the Griel Marcus "Dylan 1968-2010" collection of his writings on Dylan, and have read the Robert Shelton "No Direction Home" and Dylan's own "Chronicles" and have the "Lyrics 1962-1985" book.   And I have a couple of others laying around - "The Bob Dylan Scrapbook", "The Bob Dylan Companion", Hajdu's "Positively 4th Street", Heylin's "Behind The Shades (Revisited)" , Ricks's "Dylan's Visions of Sin", all collected in used/outlet book store shopping trips through the years.  And I have McGregor's "Retrospective" on the way.  And several videos including the deluxe "Don't Look Back" and the Scorsese "No Direction Home", which I have watched.  What am I missing that I need?  Which of the unread ones I have are or are not worth my time?   BTW, love the new "Rough and Rowdy Ways"!

One that I liked was Paul Williams's "Dylan - What Happened?"  Williams was a long time Dylan follower, and this book was a result of trying to understand Slow Train Coming and the first Warfield concerts.  His descriptions of the Warfield concerts are essential, as it includes Dylan's stage patter that (I think) were left off the box set.  Here's a good review from Goodreads: "Paul Williams grapples with his heroes acceptance of Christ. This book was written as Dylan was playing his Gospel tour with 14 shows at the Warfield Theater in San Francisco 1979. Interesting to read Williams account of each show he attended as they just happened. Also interesting how much fear and doubt about his own beliefs he lays out in the text. At 128 pages it's more a treatise on Williams psyche that Dylan's. Funny how fear and uncertainty about Dylan's artistic growth says more about his fans than the artist himself."  There's a longer review on Goodreads that's also spot on: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1818306.Dylan_What_Happened_

1818306.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Geez, all this Bob talk... forced me to pull out first pressing of Nashville Skyline that my wife gave me along  with new turntable and some Miles’s 70’s bootlegs for retirement present 5 years ago.

This was big record for me in summer of 69. Definitely picked up different vibe after    
all those records that made you think. You could just relax and think about everyday life when the world was going crazy.

I dug his religious period too. My Mom was a Gospel singer and I attended a lot of gospel concerts. In the documentary The Gospel Songs of Bob Dylan the artists that sang were the cream of the African American singers. It was impressive how they interpreted his songs. I especially enjoy Alicia Keys performance. I came away with a new appreciation of songs from that period. I am a fan, what can I say!

can you hear....John Wesley Harding ...I dreamed I saw St Augustine.

 

Edited by Gdgray
Grammar

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"John Wesley Harding". . . I return to this one more and more as time goes by. Just such vivid yet ambiguous imagery and wording. And such a wonderfully spare and vibrant musical atmosphere for most of it. This album gets under my skin.

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9 minutes ago, jazzbo said:

"John Wesley Harding". . . I return to this one more and more as time goes by. Just such vivid yet ambiguous imagery and wording. And such a wonderfully spare and vibrant musical atmosphere for most of it. This album gets under my skin.

Yes, John Wesley Harding has a certain mystical quality for me.  I remember as a child when a local FM station first played the album before it was actually released, and I taped it on a small reel-to-reel.  I listened to it over and over in terrible sound.  Dylan hadn't released anything since Blonde on Blonde and rumors had been circulating that he might be dead.  And then this...

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I find Pat Garret and Billy the Kid soundtrack overlooked a bit like JWH. There is some good music amongst the instrumentals. Another gap between New Morning in 1970 and Pat Garrett in 1973. I always looked at All things Must Pass and New Morning with same eye, probably because both out in 1970 and have "If Not for You".  Some of my favorite live Dylan songs are the five on The Concert for Bangladesh and rarely mentioned. What a classic version of Hard Rain and killer version of Just Like a Woman. 

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I've always found JWH's lyrics to be fascinating,  endlessly yielding new meanings.

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