jazzbo

Best track you heard all week

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Coleman Hawkins: "Since I Fell for You" on Bean and the Boys (Prestige)

Hawk in his magnificence

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I actually have listened to very little Nick Cave and just was streaming a bit of his newest album, Push the Sky Away. It has some good moments, but I really like "The Higgs Boson Blues" and listen to it a couple of times a day:

Edited by ejp626

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'Nova' second track on Jon Irabagon's trio recording with two guys I never heard of: Hernani Faustino on bass and Gabriel Ferrandini on drums.

Irabagon is on alto for the whole recording

Nova is alto with bass and maybe a cymbal or two by the end.

Gorgeous

Fwiw Irabagon's use of circular breathing if I'm hearing what he is doing correctly is quite organic when he employs the technique

But track 2 is maybe most remembered on first listen due to the subtle bass improvisation morphing into a simple repetitive slow vamp by the end

Also note the whole recording is freely improvised

And again the sound quality is way beyond most anything I've heard released on more well known labels over the past few years

On Not Two records

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"Paradise Squat" by Count Basie from the 1950's Verve Studio Recordings reissued on Mosaic

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Respect Sextet: Fred Anderson's 3 on 2

Great 14 minute version. Very unique take on Fred's great composition

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Minoat, from Mal Waldron's Enja release Moods. Fantastic cornet solo by Terumasa Hino.

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Dusk from Steve Lehmann Quartet Manifold

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"Griff's Groove" from this one. The eponymous G is a gas!

Eponymous G is my favorite rapper.

:lol::D:)

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Not forgetting Hieronymus B!

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Opening KV penned tune on AALY's Live at The Glenn Miller Cafe

The break at just after the 4 minute mark when they really crank is an absolute scream.

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Without a shadow of a doubt the tune "Soul Leo" from this album:

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Edited by Mike Schwartz

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"Pyramid," on the MJQ album of the same name.

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From the Mobley Mosaic Disc 5, track 1

"Don't Get Too Hip"

Sonny Clark's solo is just about the "hippest" piano solo I've ever heard!

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Joe Maneri Quartet: The Love You Are Giving Us

second long improvised track on the recording, "Dahabenzapple" with Joe starting on piano - and switiching off to some or all of his horns throughout - alto sax, tenor sax and clarinet.

with Mat Maneri on violin, Cecil McBee on bass and Randy Peterson on drums

includes a stunning solo by Peterson where we can hear the crowd erupt and explosive improvisational interplay by all throughout the 21 minutes

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Track 1, Catfish. Part of Andrew's first recording after his first association with Blue Note ended. A very haunting tune, it stayed with me for days after first hearing it. Lots of energy and momentum, quite complex, rewarding of repeated listening. This is why I sort of worship Andrew Hill.

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From the Mobley Mosaic Disc 5, track 1

"Don't Get Too Hip"

Sonny Clark's solo is just about the "hippest" piano solo I've ever heard!

from which original album?

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From the Mobley Mosaic Disc 5, track 1

"Don't Get Too Hip"

Sonny Clark's solo is just about the "hippest" piano solo I've ever heard!

from which original album?

Curtain Call

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From the Mobley Mosaic Disc 5, track 1

"Don't Get Too Hip"

Sonny Clark's solo is just about the "hippest" piano solo I've ever heard!

from which original album?

Curtain Call

thanks

was looking for the CD with Sonny Calrk @ a shop in NYC on Saturday

I will seek this one out elsewhere

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From the Mobley Mosaic Disc 5, track 1

"Don't Get Too Hip"

Sonny Clark's solo is just about the "hippest" piano solo I've ever heard!

Just got around to playing it now John. Sonny was invariably hip and groovy. Never better than at this time imo.

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Carl Neilsen - Symphony #6, conducted by Horenstein w/the Halle Orchestra)...the leaping 5-1 intervals stir memories of Coltrane's Medifations and the overall objective, logical bizarreness puts me in mind of Wayne Shorter.

It's a "track" because it's presented with no real pause between movements. Really striking music.

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Carl Neilsen - Symphony #6, conducted by Horenstein w/the Halle Orchestra)...the leaping 5-1 intervals stir memories of Coltrane's Medifations and the overall objective, logical bizarreness puts me in mind of Wayne Shorter.

It's a "track" because it's presented with no real pause between movements. Really striking music.

Strange how differently we relate to music. I've been listening to Nielsen since the late 70's and love 2-4. But 1 and 6 still have me flumoxed. Interesting how a completely different listening experience carries you into 6 straight away.

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Easy choice. The saxophone quartet version of Nonaah. I was adjusting to the piece during the first part. Then the second section just blew me away with it's contrast to the first while the third had me laughing in amazement. Extraordinary! (Thanks to Chuck for making this available again for listeners like myself who have never heard this before.)

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Carl Neilsen - Symphony #6, conducted by Horenstein w/the Halle Orchestra)...the leaping 5-1 intervals stir memories of Coltrane's Medifations and the overall objective, logical bizarreness puts me in mind of Wayne Shorter.

It's a "track" because it's presented with no real pause between movements. Really striking music.

Strange how differently we relate to music. I've been listening to Nielsen since the late 70's and love 2-4. But 1 and 6 still have me flumoxed. Interesting how a completely different listening experience carries you into 6 straight away.

I'm sorta following Horenstein right now, not composers per se. The repertoire is varied, and the clarity of the music itself is always crystal clear. I can easily see how something like this 6th could get lost in the hands of a different conductor, one who didn't hear/feel it the way Horenstein did, I mean, there's a LOT going on there, a lot of transitioning in a lot of layers, as well as a lot of opportunities for the whole thing to crash and burn, so blend and phrasing are critical to making it speak, and those are Horenstein's strengths, I believe, getting everything to speak, the pieces to speak for themselves.

In that sense, it's the exact opposite of "interpretation", no "translation" needed, just a clear(est) understanding, but in the real world, any group of one or more musicians can deliver the music any different number of ways, and when you have an orchestra and a score, you pretty much have to have that conductor to decide What Are We Saying Here, And How Are We Going To Do It. For whatever reasons, Horenstien is getting the music to speak to me with incredible clarity. So, I'm just checking him out, and wherever that leads is where it leads.

But yeah, coming to it from where I'm coming from it, a lot of it is like hearing from an unknown cousin (or more appropriately in chronological terms, uncle) from a foreign land, so to speak, something where you hear it and say, oh yeah, THAT, I know what THAT'S talking about, that's folks. The guy seems kind of darkly serious-funny to me, not at all unlike Wayne Shorter...quite similar actually, not as much in terms of devices (although, perhaps some...) as in terms of being a very...layered person in their music, especially in terms of being batshit crazy and seriously right all at once, can't accept the one without accepting the other. I love it when that happens.

The same CD that has the 6th also has the 3rd, and to me, that's some tough sledding, not in terms of hearing it, but in terms of liking it, at least to this point. I hear a lot of the same devices in the 3rd as I do the 6th, but not put to as deft a use. But I'll give it a few more gos before deciding. The 6th, however, is going on my iPod to serve as walking music.

What I don't know (and at this point don't care about too much) is if these devices were sort of a running thing with him, like what he made his symphonies "about" in some way, like how a novelist will create a set of characters and keep coming back to them over the years, have them age, grow, change, etc. If that's the case, then perhaps a complete set would be nice. But maybe not...like I said, I can hear plenty of ways for this music to "go wrong" in interpretation. So...we shall se. I got time, at least until I don't, and the "complete all at once" thing is not something I'm gonna do just to do.

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