Durium

BFT #61

115 posts in this topic

OK, details - this is, somewhat astonishingly, from an album by Vince and Bola Sete, http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&a...10:0zfexq8gldte

though Bola Sete must be off having a quiet cough and a drag. It doesn't say who the bass player & drummer are, so I don't know.

MG

Thanks MG for your identification.

seta01.jpg

I became fascinated to Bola Seta, the Brazilian guitar player when I saw him on a DVD in duo with Vince Guaraldi at the piano ( and Fred Marshall on bass - Jerry Granelli on drums) in a Ralph Gleason's Jazz Casual episodes. Bola Seta had been discovered the previous year by Dizzy Gillespie. As I wanted to hear more of this duo I bought myself the Vince & Bola album with 1963 recordings of the quartet mentioned above and a 1966 live recording at the El Matador previous released on a Fantasy album. The track People is from that session and both bass and drums are not identified.

4180AAHPGKL._SL500_AA240_.jpg

Enjoy some fragments of the 1963 Vince Guaraldi - Bola Sete Quartet on the Jazz Casual DVD

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Ok – I've finally gotten a chance to post. I've had the BFT on my car stereo and listened thru a couple of times. I'm going to post my impressions. First off -Thanks Durium – It's all good. I enjoyed every track. IMHO there were no clunkers. These tests can be real humblers though- I really have no positive ids.

1.Looking Good But Feeling Bad - Good humorous version.

2.When You Wish Upon A Star – Nice Bird like alto in a smoky mood.

3.Django – Very nice version. They hit the “Gypsy Jazz” feel pretty nicely when they go into tempo and in the out of tempo parts the guitarist states the melody beautifully. Nice chops. guitar

4.People – I get very bugged when I can't id something I think I should. Nice.

5.Don't know what and don't know who. Nice playing all around.

6.Almost sounds like “Grandpa's Spells” in the front but then the changes go elsewhere. Cute.

7.A Pretty Girl Is Like A Melody – Very Hot Club like. Latter day Stephen Grapelli is just a guess on my part. Nice record.

8.A nice whimsical little piece. Electric bass on this.

9.Dippermouth – Liked it, but no idea who. The trombonist managed to play a lot of Dutrey's licks but put his own “english” on it.

10.Salt Peanuts - A Dixieland version! Hah! Made me laugh out loud. Dig the quotes from El Manisero (The Peanut Vendor) by the trumpet. A while back – on my previous computer- somebody sent me a Dixieland version of “Giant Steps”. I had the same reaction. I Loved it.

Now to read everybody's posts.

Thanks for your list of thoughts and sugstions. Harold_Z - Let's have a look.

2.When You Wish Upon A Star – Nice Bird like alto in a smoky mood.

You're right saying Nice Bird like alto in a smoky mood. This alto sax player played his instrument in the same tradition as Parker, and he was even labeled as the succesor of bird. It was a pity, that didn't oly copy the music, but also bird's other habits. It brought him in jail for almost 30 years all together. This musician was already identified by Sidewinder and I cherish my memories of one of his last concertsI heard last year some weeks before he passed away.

3.Django – Very nice version. They hit the “Gypsy Jazz” feel pretty nicely when they go into tempo and in the out of tempo parts the guitarist states the melody beautifully. Nice chops. guitar

Indeed - a great unkjown and underestimated guitar player. This Norwegian musician was already identified by Snoozer.

4.People – I get very bugged when I can't id something I think I should. Nice.

Don't bother - I share that same feeling when i listen to other BFTs <_<

5.Don't know what and don't know who. Nice playing all around.

The musician has alreasdy been identified by Snoozer as Hamilton De holanda, but I love to have more info about the style of music he plays and his instrument.

7.A Pretty Girl Is Like A Melody – Very Hot Club like. Latter day Stephen Grapelli is just a guess on my part. Nice record.

Not a strange thought as both musicians played the violin and were playing in the Hot club du France circuit. This track hasalready been identified by Snoozer

9.Dippermouth – Liked it, but no idea who. The trombonist managed to play a lot of Dutrey's licks but put his own “english” on it.

It will surprise you .... :winky:

10.Salt Peanuts - A Dixieland version! Hah! Made me laugh out loud. Dig the quotes from El Manisero (The Peanut Vendor) by the trumpet. A while back – on my previous computer- somebody sent me a Dixieland version of “Giant Steps”. I had the same reaction. I Loved it.

Amazing to learn that most contributors to this BFT have the key in their hands, but don't use it. Of course I'm not sure, but that dixieland version of Giant Steps could have been from the same group. Do you remember its name?

Well so far up to now.

I will post comments to your next tracks soon.

Keep swinging

Durium

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Ok – I've finally gotten a chance to post. I've had the BFT on my car stereo and listened thru a couple of times. I'm going to post my impressions. First off -Thanks Durium – It's all good. I enjoyed every track. IMHO there were no clunkers. These tests can be real humblers though- I really have no positive ids.

11.The Sheik Of Araby – A stride/boogie rendition. Wild guess – Joe Turner?

12.In My Solitude - Two basses and a piano. Nice.

13.A piano quartet

14.Piano trio playing a blues. Again I'm bugged because I can't id the player. Monkish but not Monk.

15.With A Song In My Heart – Nice playing all around.

16.Our Love Is Here To Stay – Nice trombone duo with rhythm. Good playing all around.

17.Evidence - again Monk but not Monk. Monk is unique. So when a pianist does a Monk tune and goes ….Monkish I'm not thrilled. It's too much of an effection. Then on the other hand why shouldn't a good player do whatever he wants to? So I'm conflicted about that issue.

18.Looking At The World Through Rose Colored Glasses – It's a nice way to see the world.

19. The tag.

Now to read everybody's posts.

Well Harold_Z. Let's comment the second half of the selection.

11.The Sheik Of Araby – A stride/boogie rendition. Wild guess – Joe Turner?

This track has already been identified by Alex. and surprised most of you .......

12.In My Solitude - Two basses and a piano. Nice.

............ okay, and a ............... there's another instrument at the end !! :blink: One bass player has already been recognized - who's the other and for what occasion this track was played?

13.A piano quartet

Yep

14.Piano trio playing a blues. Again I'm bugged because I can't id the player. Monkish but not Monk.

Correct again ...............

15.With A Song In My Heart – | 16.Our Love Is Here To Stay | 17.Evidence.

You identified the titles correct, now who's playing this?

19. The tag.

You may call it as you like it, but it's a complete tune and the original title is much ............. longer

Thanks Harold_Z for your suggestions. I'm sure the discussion has not been finished up to now. I gave several suggestions, so ...... maybe next year? <_<

Keep swinging

Durium

Edited by Durium

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1. I recognized the tune right away – Fats Waller’s “Lookin’ Good But Feelin’ Bad”. Frankly, I can’t stand this cutesy novelty version, presumably by a British band, perhaps the Temperance Seven? Good trombone player. Corny alto, hate the vocalist!

2. “When You Wish Upon a Star” just a little vignette of a performance – not a lot going on here, no clue who’s playing.

3. “Django” Really don’t know who this is. Is what they call “gypsy jazz”? I’d have liked this better if they’d stretched out a bit. This is too short – no time to get into anything. Guitar soloist has got chops, but this didn’t do much for me.

4. “People” I guess this was recorded in the mid 1960’s when this was a new popular tune. This is one of those “kitchen-sink” arrangements – a little rubato here, a little funk there. Possibly Pete Jolly, or maybe Victor Feldman? Nothing special here.

5. Trying to figure out what the lead instrument here is! Tiple, perhaps? Some virtuosic picking here, but a little too busy and fusion-y for my tastes.

6. Again, another tiple? I liked this better, the tune reminds me of “Darktown Strutters’ Ball”.

7. “A Pretty Girl Is Like a Melody”. One’s first thought is Grappelly and Django, but the violin sounds a little darker in tone than I’m accustomed to from Stephane, unless this is a later recording. The guitarist has certainly heard Django, but I’m not convinced that this is him. The recording seems too recent sounding for it to be Django, and even though this guy has the characteristics, he doesn’t have the fire. More gypsy jazz?

8. At first, I’m turned off by the electric bass on this, and it’s just too light and polite. No thanks.

9. “Dippermouth Blues” Here’s a lifeless, academic recreation of the King Oliver Creole Jazz Band. I love traditional jazz, but this leaves me cold. Clarinetist is barely competent! Again, no thanks!

10. Some years ago, there was a trad band that made an album of bop tunes in dixieland style. I believe they were called The Anachronic Jazz Band. Might this be them? This arrangement of “Salt Peanuts” has sufficent fire and drive, and points up what’s wrong with track #9. If you’re going to play this music (or any music I guess) put some juice into it! Enjoyed this a lot!

11. “The Sheik of Araby” I suspect that this was recorded in the 1940’s, and although I can hear traces of Teddy Wilson, Earl Hines, and of course the boogie woogie giants, I think this is a young Oscar Peterson, recorded at the beginning of his career. Chops to spare, but too self consciously virtuosic, always the show-off. Audiences can eat this kind of thing up, but hammering away like this leaves me cold.

12. Two basses playing “Solitude”. No idea who they are. Clarinet reminds me of Tony Scott a little. Kind of a throwaway.

13. Nice drumming opens this track. This sounds like a Christmas tune to me! Things get a little static by the time the band joins in, and the less said about the alto, the better! I wonder if this might be one of the early avant garde guys like maybe Jimmy Woods? He’s barely cutting it, and he brings the whole performance down.

14. This sounds to be a 1950’s recording of “Swedish Pastry”, perhaps by a European pianist? I liked this OK, but it isn’t killing me. Pianist hits a couple of clams in the opening head, and is a little short of ideas during his solo. But still, this has its moments.

15. Now, this is my favorite track on the whole disc. Of course, the tune is “With a Song In My Heart”, one of many classics from Rodgers & Hart, and this arrangement reminds me of the one Sonny Clark did on “Sonny’s Crib”. But this isn’t that recording, and as familiar as it all is, I can’t identify any of the musicians. Might this be some young guys like maybe Eric Alexander & Jim Rotondi?

16. From Rodgers & Hart to Gershwin, we’ve got two ‘bone players tackling “Our Love Is Here To Stay”. I liked this, but again, aside from the obvious reminder of Jai & Kai (this isn’t them, probably something much more recent), I can’t name the players, although I did enjoy this. They both can play!

17. Thelonious Monk’s “Evidence”, played too fast, in my opinion. The whole thing is too choppy and just doesn’t swing. Art Blakey would have demonstrated the right tempo!!

18. Hated this, can’t stand the oh-so-cute vocalist, and the violin is weak. Pretty good pianist, however. Rose Colored Glasses, indeed. Take 'em off!

19. Boop-boop-be-doop!

Some nice choices, and a few that left me cold. Thanks for the effort, Hans!

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1. I recognized the tune right away – Fats Waller’s “Lookin’ Good But Feelin’ Bad”. Frankly, I can’t stand this cutesy novelty version, presumably by a British band, perhaps the Temperance Seven? Good trombone player. Corny alto, hate the vocalist!

2. “When You Wish Upon a Star” just a little vignette of a performance – not a lot going on here, no clue who’s playing.

3. “Django” Really don’t know who this is. Is what they call “gypsy jazz”? I’d have liked this better if they’d stretched out a bit. This is too short – no time to get into anything. Guitar soloist has got chops, but this didn’t do much for me.

4. “People” I guess this was recorded in the mid 1960’s when this was a new popular tune. This is one of those “kitchen-sink” arrangements – a little rubato here, a little funk there. Possibly Pete Jolly, or maybe Victor Feldman? Nothing special here.

5. Trying to figure out what the lead instrument here is! Tiple, perhaps? Some virtuosic picking here, but a little too busy and fusion-y for my tastes.

6. Again, another tiple? I liked this better, the tune reminds me of “Darktown Strutters’ Ball”.

7. “A Pretty Girl Is Like a Melody”. One’s first thought is Grappelly and Django, but the violin sounds a little darker in tone than I’m accustomed to from Stephane, unless this is a later recording. The guitarist has certainly heard Django, but I’m not convinced that this is him. The recording seems too recent sounding for it to be Django, and even though this guy has the characteristics, he doesn’t have the fire. More gypsy jazz?

8. At first, I’m turned off by the electric bass on this, and it’s just too light and polite. No thanks.

9. “Dippermouth Blues” Here’s a lifeless, academic recreation of the King Oliver Creole Jazz Band. I love traditional jazz, but this leaves me cold. Clarinetist is barely competent! Again, no thanks!

10. Some years ago, there was a trad band that made an album of bop tunes in dixieland style. I believe they were called The Anachronic Jazz Band. Might this be them? This arrangement of “Salt Peanuts” has sufficent fire and drive, and points up what’s wrong with track #9. If you’re going to play this music (or any music I guess) put some juice into it! Enjoyed this a lot!

Welcome Stereojack to be the first one to continue the discussion of BFT #61 in 2009. Hope it will become a swinging year for all of us! I will discuss track one up to track ten today - the rest tomorrow. Most tracks from that first part have been identified already, but I'll check your suggestions .................. and comment it. And - congratulations Stereojack, you did identify one of the tracks for the very first time !!

Let's have a look to your list.

1. I recognized the tune right away – Fats Waller’s “Lookin’ Good But Feelin’ Bad”. Frankly, I can’t stand this cutesy novelty version, presumably by a British band, perhaps the Temperance Seven? Good trombone player. Corny alto, hate the vocalist!

Of course it's Lookin' Good But Feelin' Bad". No, it's not by a British band and the name you suggests, Temperance Seven, a group that plays in a rather traditional jazz styles; the group that is respnsable for tis version is, first of all, a band playng in the Free Jazz styles.

2. “When You Wish Upon a Star” just a little vignette of a performance – not a lot going on here, no clue who’s playing.

The tune is correct - the track has been identified by Sidewinder.

3. “Django” Really don’t know who this is. Is what they call “gypsy jazz”? I’d have liked this better if they’d stretched out a bit. This is too short – no time to get into anything. Guitar soloist has got chops, but this didn’t do much for me.

The tune is indeed Django and the man who plays the guitar is not a Manouche at all, but he was fascinated by the music of Django. Snoozer already identified this Norwegian guitar player.

4. “People” I guess this was recorded in the mid 1960’s when this was a new popular tune. This is one of those “kitchen-sink” arrangements – a little rubato here, a little funk there. Possibly Pete Jolly, or maybe Victor Feldman? Nothing special here.

The tune titles is not the most difficult part of this BFT - you suggestion is alright. The track is from a live recording in the mid 1960s, so, you're okay again. MG did identified the guitar player and piano player. The rhythm section is unknown.

5. Trying to figure out what the lead instrument here is! Tiple, perhaps? Some virtuosic picking here, but a little too busy and fusion-y for my tastes.

Well, it's not a Tiple (a small Portuguese guitar), but your sugestions points into the right direction. This man, identified as Hamilton De Holanda by Snoozer, plays a typically instrument. I love to know the name of the instrument and, I agree, this tune, indeed, is rather busy and fusion-y, and I love to know more about what the musical roots of this man are.

6. Again, another tiple? I liked this better, the tune reminds me of “Darktown Strutters’ Ball”.

Almost correct, is I should label this instrument , the Tiple as a small Portuguese guitar, it's almost correct - it's name has been changed in some other countries. You could label it as a cavaquinho of ukulele. This tune was already identified by Snoozer.

7. “A Pretty Girl Is Like a Melody”. One’s first thought is Grappelly and Django, but the violin sounds a little darker in tone than I’m accustomed to from Stephane, unless this is a later recording. The guitarist has certainly heard Django, but I’m not convinced that this is him. The recording seems too recent sounding for it to be Django, and even though this guy has the characteristics, he doesn’t have the fire. More gypsy jazz?

This trqk has been identiefied by Snoozer too and you can read all about the relation between Django and this violin player Leo Slab. You're correct saying this is a contemporary recording, so the guitar player must have hear Django playing on record only.

9. “Dippermouth Blues” Here’s a lifeless, academic recreation of the King Oliver Creole Jazz Band. I love traditional jazz, but this leaves me cold. Clarinetist is barely competent! Again, no thanks!

In your opinion this is a bad attempt to revive a Joe King Oliver recording. Other's in this list label it as pure New Orleans music, close related to the original roots. Well, this track is still a mystery for all ( except myself of course) listeners. You will be surprised.

10. Some years ago, there was a trad band that made an album of bop tunes in dixieland style. I believe they were called The Anachronic Jazz Band. Might this be them? This arrangement of “Salt Peanuts” has sufficent fire and drive, and points up what’s wrong with track #9. If you’re going to play this music (or any music I guess) put some juice into it! Enjoyed this a lot!

Most people who gave me their comments to this track made a remark about the descrepancy between the bobish tune Sal Peanuts and the traditional dixieland style. They ment that the tune and the style was an anachronism, but I couldn 't use that word ...... Harold_Z even remembered another tune, titled Giant Steps played by a dixieland - well, Stereojack, your suggestion is correct; The Anachronic Jazz Band. Let me first give you the details:

10. (4:05)

Anachronic1a.jpg

ANACHRONIC JAZZ BANDPatrick Artero tp - Claude Gousset tb - Marc Richard cl as tp co, Dominique Vernhes cl as, Andre Villeger cl as ts ss, Philippe Baudoin p, Lionel Benhamou g banj, Gerard Gervois tu, dominique Obadia dm. reeds ( rest unknown)

Salt Peanuts ( D.Gillespie - Kenny Clarke)

Recorded at the Theatre du Ranelagh, Paris, November 1978.

This group of young French traditional jazz musicians founded their Anachronic Jazz Band, a group that played tunes from

the bebop repertoire in a dixieland style setting. They did this in an inimitable way. As far as I know these tracks have

never been released on CD. If so, I'll be the first one to obtain a copy.

Learn more about this Anachronic Jazz Band and about the tune Salt Peanuts.

Thanks so far, Stereojack

That's for today. Tomorrow I'll discuss your comments for track 11 up to 19.

Keep swinging

Durium

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Durium - I don't remember the name of the group who did Giant Steps. I lost the mp3 file when that computer crashed and I can't remember who sent it to me.

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11. “The Sheik of Araby” I suspect that this was recorded in the 1940’s, and although I can hear traces of Teddy Wilson, Earl Hines, and of course the boogie woogie giants, I think this is a young Oscar Peterson, recorded at the beginning of his career. Chops to spare, but too self consciously virtuosic, always the show-off. Audiences can eat this kind of thing up, but hammering away like this leaves me cold.

12. Two basses playing “Solitude”. No idea who they are. Clarinet reminds me of Tony Scott a little. Kind of a throwaway.

13. Nice drumming opens this track. This sounds like a Christmas tune to me! Things get a little static by the time the band joins in, and the less said about the alto, the better! I wonder if this might be one of the early avant garde guys like maybe Jimmy Woods? He’s barely cutting it, and he brings the whole performance down.

14. This sounds to be a 1950’s recording of “Swedish Pastry”, perhaps by a European pianist? I liked this OK, but it isn’t killing me. Pianist hits a couple of clams in the opening head, and is a little short of ideas during his solo. But still, this has its moments.

15. Now, this is my favorite track on the whole disc. Of course, the tune is “With a Song In My Heart”, one of many classics from Rodgers & Hart, and this arrangement reminds me of the one Sonny Clark did on “Sonny’s Crib”. But this isn’t that recording, and as familiar as it all is, I can’t identify any of the musicians. Might this be some young guys like maybe Eric Alexander & Jim Rotondi?

16. From Rodgers & Hart to Gershwin, we’ve got two ‘bone players tackling “Our Love Is Here To Stay”. I liked this, but again, aside from the obvious reminder of Jai & Kai (this isn’t them, probably something much more recent), I can’t name the players, although I did enjoy this. They both can play!

17. Thelonious Monk’s “Evidence”, played too fast, in my opinion. The whole thing is too choppy and just doesn’t swing. Art Blakey would have demonstrated the right tempo!!

18. Hated this, can’t stand the oh-so-cute vocalist, and the violin is weak. Pretty good pianist, however. Rose Colored Glasses, indeed. Take 'em off!

19. Boop-boop-be-doop!

Some nice choices, and a few that left me cold. Thanks for the effort, Hans!

As promissed now I wil discuss the second part of your suggestions. Some have been identified already, but most not, so .................. let's go!

11. “The Sheik of Araby” I suspect that this was recorded in the 1940’s, and although I can hear traces of Teddy Wilson, Earl Hines, and of course the boogie woogie giants, I think this is a young Oscar Peterson, recorded at the beginning of his career. Chops to spare, but too self consciously virtuosic, always the show-off. Audiences can eat this kind of thing up, but hammering away like this leaves me cold.

Your correct. Alex. pointed to that name before.

12. Two basses playing “Solitude”. No idea who they are. Clarinet reminds me of Tony Scott a little. Kind of a throwaway.

Sure, two bass players. The clarinet player is NOT Tony Scott who passed away 1.5 years ago.

13. Nice drumming opens this track. This sounds like a Christmas tune to me! Things get a little static by the time the band joins in, and the less said about the alto, the better! I wonder if this might be one of the early avant garde guys like maybe Jimmy Woods? He’s barely cutting it, and he brings the whole performance down.

The drummer man is a leading name here in this part of the world, like the alto saxophone player. So NOT Jimmy Woods. The theme of the tune has, indeed, some elements from the song "Gloria in excelsis Deo"

14. This sounds to be a 1950’s recording of “Swedish Pastry”, perhaps by a European pianist? I liked this OK, but it isn’t killing me. Pianist hits a couple of clams in the opening head, and is a little short of ideas during his solo. But still, this has its moments.

You're correct in saying that it is a European piano player, but notfrom the 1950s and not the tune Swedish Pastry.

15. Now, this is my favorite track on the whole disc. Of course, the tune is “With a Song In My Heart”, one of many classics from Rodgers & Hart, and this arrangement reminds me of the one Sonny Clark did on “Sonny’s Crib”. But this isn’t that recording, and as familiar as it all is, I can’t identify any of the musicians. Might this be some young guys like maybe Eric Alexander & Jim Rotondi?

Of course the tune is “With a Song In My Heart”. If they are young guys depends of your age - the saxophone player is 60 years old like the trumpet player. It's not Eric Alexander nor Jim Rotondi.

16. From Rodgers & Hart to Gershwin, we’ve got two ‘bone players tackling “Our Love Is Here To Stay”. I liked this, but again, aside from the obvious reminder of Jai & Kai (this isn’t them, probably something much more recent), I can’t name the players, although I did enjoy this. They both can play!

The two bones were fascinated by Jay & Kai.

17. Thelonious Monk’s “Evidence”, played too fast, in my opinion. The whole thing is too choppy and just doesn’t swing. Art Blakey would have demonstrated the right tempo!!

The title of the tune is correct.

19. Boop-boop-be-doop!

No, not the sweet charming mrs. Boop.

Thanks Stereojack for your comments. As always, some tracks may be not your cup of tea - some do. Thanks for your comments. I'm anxious to read some comments of the others left.

Keep swinging

Durium

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Durium - I don't remember the name of the group who did Giant Steps. I lost the mp3 file when that computer crashed and I can't remember who sent it to me.

It must have been the Anachronic Jazz Band I refered to in my comments. Stereojack identified this band, which played be-bop arrangements in a dixieland setting.

Keep swinging

Durium

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OK, haven't looked at this thread yet.....

1: Well, it's definitely Rudi Mahall on the bass clarinet, no idea about the rest, but a guess (given the material) would put this as Aki Takase's Fats Waller album. Ehhhh.... they seem to be trying too hard to be wacky.

2: Jiminy cricket! No idea, maybe Bud Shank, hard to get a bead on given its brevity.

3: So it starts MJQ style before switching to the hot club swing of the dedicatee. The flash is enjoyable, though there's none of the lyrical abandon of Django.

4: This is much more my speed than the preceding tracks. Ahmad Jamalish pianist, I forget the name of the tune. It doesn't strike me as really lifting the roof off, but I liked it.

[more to come]

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OK, haven't looked at this thread yet.....

1: Well, it's definitely Rudi Mahall on the bass clarinet, no idea about the rest, but a guess (given the material) would put this as Aki Takase's Fats Waller album. Ehhhh.... they seem to be trying too hard to be wacky.

2: Jiminy cricket! No idea, maybe Bud Shank, hard to get a bead on given its brevity.

3: So it starts MJQ style before switching to the hot club swing of the dedicatee. The flash is enjoyable, though there's none of the lyrical abandon of Django.

4: This is much more my speed than the preceding tracks. Ahmad Jamalish pianist, I forget the name of the tune. It doesn't strike me as really lifting the roof off, but I liked it.

[more to come]

Dear Nate,

Thanks for your suggestions about the first tracks .................

1: Well, it's definitely Rudi Mahall on the bass clarinet, no idea about the rest, but a guess (given the material) would put this as Aki Takase's Fats Waller album. Ehhhh.... they seem to be trying too hard to be wacky.

Great !! I'd never expect that this track would be identifief - you did.

Let's give the details:

1. (2:49)

AKI TAKASE plays "FATS" WALLER

AKI TAKASE SEXTET

Aki Takase p - Eugene Chadbourne vol, banj, g - Nils Wogram tb - Rudi Mahall bcl - Thomas Heberer tp - Paul Lovens dm.

Lookin'Good, but feelin'bad ( Lester A Santly-Thomas Fats Waller)

recorded Hamburg - 2-3 June, 2003 (Enja CD 9152)

takase.jpg

I learned for the first time about Aki Takase and her music in a program on MEZZO TV, the French jazz and classical music TV company, thatr's here on the cable. She's a free-jazz piano pl;ayer, of Japanese origin, but living in Germany.I was glad I found the CD a few months later visiting Brussels in Belgium and I found it a great starter for this compilation "Something Old Sometrhing New" and, as you know that Fats Waller was my first idol in jazz you can imagine why I started with a tune from this album, which features other classics like Vipers Drag, Handfl of Keys and hold Tight and all those other Waller classics. I like the vocals of banjo player Eugene Chadbourne and the bassclarinet of Rudi Mahall. - a great performer on that instrument. Hope you liked this opener!!

Aki Takase plays Fats Waller

2: Jiminy cricket! No idea, maybe Bud Shank, hard to get a bead on given its brevity.

no, it isn't bud Shank. Sidewinder already identified this track.

3: So it starts MJQ style before switching to the hot club swing of the dedicatee. The flash is enjoyable, though there's none of the lyrical abandon of Django.

This track has been identified by Snoozer and you're correct stating that this guitar player has listened to Django .... He even was at a concert of Django in Oslo, Norway, I read somewhere .....

4: This is much more my speed than the preceding tracks. Ahmad Jamalish pianist, I forget the name of the tune. It doesn't strike me as really lifting the roof off, but I liked it.

No, this live recordings isn't Ahmad Jamal. I really liked the guitar player and was fascinated by his playing. MG did identified this track.

I'm anxious to read your other suggestions, Nate. Some tracks have been identified but most haven't. Thanks for your identificatiuon of the Aki Takase track.

Keep swinging

Durium

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Thanks to Durium for the invitation to join in. It's been a while, but as usual, the traditional thanks and disclaimers remain firmly in place. And now, on with the show.

TRACK ONE - Not from my neighborhood, if you know what I mean, but I can hear and feel the fun, as well as the superb skill involved. Plus, a lot of information in less than thee minutes. That's kind of a lost art in many parts of the musical world. I enjoyed it.

TRACK TWO - Frank Morgan? Sounds like something I have by him but haven't listened to in many years. What can you say? There's a mature lyricism there that is really beautiful. Sure is a short cut, though? But then again, it leaves nothing lacking, so it's all good there.

TRACK THREE - "Django" underwater? AH! It's gypsy-like strumming, NOW I get it! Can't say that I'm particularly moved by this rendition, but that's not to say that those who played it weren't. I would hope that they were!

TRACK FOUR - "People" and, I'm assuming, Bill Evans. Not a huge fan of either song or pianist, but I do dig the reharmonization he does here. And I must say that my lack of passion for Evans is over the long-term. An occasional exposure here and there always works nice, Only now that we get into it, I'm not so sure that this is Evans! Either way, I like the reharmonization, but find the soloing quite pedestrian.

TRACK FIVE - Don't know the songs or the players, but everybody plays well, and they seem to mean it all, so hey, it's all good for me.

TRACK SIX - Is that a ukelele? A tiple? Whatever, kudos for execution on what is probably a smallish fretboard. That's gotta be a labor of love.

TRACK SEVEN - Well, yes she is, but sometimes the more you know her, the melody changes from major to minor, from sweet to discordant. C'est la vie! Not really my cup of tea, but no fault to be found either, not when the playing is as good as this.

TRACK EIGHT - Electric bass? A somewhat anachronistic choice, but it works (or else my speakers don't!). Don't think the playing itself is working for me, though....doesn't seem "real" to me in some form or fashion. sorry. Trumpet almost sounds like Wynton, which would indeed be high irony, but I don't think it is,

TRACK NINE - I recognize, I think, "Dippermouth Blues". And enjoy it well enough as presented here this one time.

TRACK TEN - Something like this was circulating amongst local musicians' emails a while back. I forget who it is, but I dig it, and not just for the novelty. I mean, why not?

TRACK ELEVEN - Always glad to hear the Shiek (watch out though, there's been rumors out of Vegas that he'll sneak into your tent naked as a jaybird!)! Perfect mid-40s club fare, I should think. A little goes a long way, but in that day and in those places, that's what the purpose would have been, right? Beyond that, it gets wearying pretty fast, but no need to worry about that on a BFT, is there now!

TRACK TWELVE - "Solitude", of course. I love this tune. Bassist seems to have been touched by Mingus (which is not necessarily the same as having been "influenced" by him). That fatass tone puts me in mind of Red Mitchell, who was one of the kings of fatass tones (at least on records...) Or maybe Ron Carter even? Ah, clarinet...a kinda stiff player, on this little hearing... Yeah, definitely Ron Carter, w/a 2nd bassist. Ron Carter has gotten (and deserved) a lot of shit over the years, but when the guy comes to play, he plays. I'm diggin' this one.

TRACK THIRTEEN - Great drumming (and great drum tuning) on the intro. After that, it's good enough. Interesting altoist, sounds like he's pushing himself to not just play licks, with inconsistent results. But that's the risks you take when improvising (and that's also a reason why few people truly improvise) But really, that drum intro is enough all by itself!

TRACK FOURTEEN - Ok, I think it's Bird tune, but the name escapes me. I've heard better, I've heard worse. At this point, I look at stuff like this as documents of where people were on their way to someplace else - either this zone only more fully realized or else some other zone altogether that they had to go through this one to get to. Or. occasionally, on their way out altogether. My hunch is that with this player it's one of the first two. But it's almost like you can hear/feel how the weight of trying to channel, hell, just remembering, Bird's/Bud's vocabulary is weighing on them, almost like a 250 pound weight on your stomach, yeah you can support it, and yeah you can still breathe, but not like you could if it wasn't there.

TRACK FIFTEEN - Great song, "With a Song In My Heart"! Very in the Brown/Roach/Rollins bag, and very cooking too...sounds to me like they come by it honestly enough. Tenor playing occasionally betrays some "schoolboy" lickage, but hides it very well. I could almost go George Coleman on this one, actually....almost. If there were more examples of this, the "it doesn't matter how old a style you play in" argument would be easier made! KUDOS TO THE DRUMMER! And the pianist's comp. These ain't no kids, and they ain't no Dictaphones either.

TRACK SIXTEEN - "Our Love Is Here To Stay", Not sure that the "duetting" is working for me as well as having them play separately might have. Mr. Piano Player is a treat, though. Roger Kellaway? Roland Haana, even? Nice!

TRACK SEVENTEEN - "Evidence". Went from not caring for it to liking it about halfway through...Funny thing, once they get going, if you could isolate the pianist's right hand and the drummer, what you'd be left with would be not at all out of place on an early fusion record! That whole motivic/pentatonic thing that sprung from Trane went into "straight ahead" & fusion jazzs both, and now they've kinda come back into one thing for many players...Kenny Barron used to play a lot like this, but I don't think that this is him...could be, though...

TRACK EIGHTEEN - Not a tune with which I've ever shared much passion...and I'm afraid the same holds true for this rendition, as fine as it is. I'll take the Sinatra/Basie version and be done with it. Thanks anyway!

TRACK NINETEEN - But of course! :g

All told, an enjoyable collection of heretofore unknown and unheard titles. Thanks for inviting me in, Durium, it was fun!

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Thanks to Durium for the invitation to join in. It's been a while, but as usual, the traditional thanks and disclaimers remain firmly in place. And now, on with the show.

TRACK ONE - Not from my neighborhood, if you know what I mean, but I can hear and feel the fun, as well as the superb skill involved. Plus, a lot of information in less than thee minutes. That's kind of a lost art in many parts of the musical world. I enjoyed it.

TRACK TWO - Frank Morgan? Sounds like something I have by him but haven't listened to in many years. What can you say? There's a mature lyricism there that is really beautiful. Sure is a short cut, though? But then again, it leaves nothing lacking, so it's all good there.

TRACK THREE - "Django" underwater? AH! It's gypsy-like strumming, NOW I get it! Can't say that I'm particularly moved by this rendition, but that's not to say that those who played it weren't. I would hope that they were!

TRACK FOUR - "People" and, I'm assuming, Bill Evans. Not a huge fan of either song or pianist, but I do dig the reharmonization he does here. And I must say that my lack of passion for Evans is over the long-term. An occasional exposure here and there always works nice, Only now that we get into it, I'm not so sure that this is Evans! Either way, I like the reharmonization, but find the soloing quite pedestrian.

TRACK FIVE - Don't know the songs or the players, but everybody plays well, and they seem to mean it all, so hey, it's all good for me.

TRACK SIX - Is that a ukelele? A tiple? Whatever, kudos for execution on what is probably a smallish fretboard. That's gotta be a labor of love.

TRACK SEVEN - Well, yes she is, but sometimes the more you know her, the melody changes from major to minor, from sweet to discordant. C'est la vie! Not really my cup of tea, but no fault to be found either, not when the playing is as good as this.

TRACK EIGHT - Electric bass? A somewhat anachronistic choice, but it works (or else my speakers don't!). Don't think the playing itself is working for me, though....doesn't seem "real" to me in some form or fashion. sorry. Trumpet almost sounds like Wynton, which would indeed be high irony, but I don't think it is,

TRACK NINE - I recognize, I think, "Dippermouth Blues". And enjoy it well enough as presented here this one time.

TRACK TEN - Something like this was circulating amongst local musicians' emails a while back. I forget who it is, but I dig it, and not just for the novelty. I mean, why not?

All told, an enjoyable collection of heretofore unknown and unheard titles. Thanks for inviting me in, Durium, it was fun!

You're welvcome JNgry - hope you l;iked it.

Love to discuss your first selection. Some tracks, especially the first ones, have been identified; a lot not (yet). Let's seee what you think about it!!

TRACK ONE - Not from my neighborhood, if you know what I mean, but I can hear and feel the fun, as well as the superb skill involved. Plus, a lot of information in less than thee minutes. That's kind of a lost art in many parts of the musical world. I enjoyed it.

It's really a Fats Waller killer diller played in a special way and a good starter I think. Nate already identified the band.

TRACK TWO - Frank Morgan? Sounds like something I have by him but haven't listened to in many years. What can you say? There's a mature lyricism there that is really beautiful. Sure is a short cut, though? But then again, it leaves nothing lacking, so it's all good there.

Sure, JSngry, it's Frank Morgan. A very nice man. Sidewinder already identified this man and I told him about one of the last concerts, 13 months ago, where he performed with the Rein De Graaff Trio. A great concert.

TRACK FOUR - "People" and, I'm assuming, Bill Evans. Not a huge fan of either song or pianist, but I do dig the reharmonization he does here. And I must say that my lack of passion for Evans is over the long-term. An occasional exposure here and there always works nice, Only now that we get into it, I'm not so sure that this is Evans! Either way, I like the reharmonization, but find the soloing quite pedestrian.

I feel that some doubts have arisen concerning your first suggestion that the piano player might be Bill Evans. you're riht - it isn't. MG identified this piano player and guitarist in this live recording.

TRACK SIX - Is that a ukelele? A tiple? Whatever, kudos for execution on what is probably a smallish fretboard. That's gotta be a labor of love.

Sure, this is a ukulele and the most difficult of playing that instruments was to keep it in your hands ............. Snoozer identified the player, who told him that sotry about making this record.

TRACK EIGHT - Electric bass? A somewhat anachronistic choice, but it works (or else my speakers don't!). Don't think the playing itself is working for me, though....doesn't seem "real" to me in some form or fashion. sorry. Trumpet almost sounds like Wynton, which would indeed be high irony, but I don't think it is,

Most listeners don't like the electric bass and I can agree on that. The most important musician on this track is the tenor saxophone player. The trumpet player isn't Wynton - you're right.

TRACK TEN - Something like this was circulating amongst local musicians' emails a while back. I forget who it is, but I dig it, and not just for the novelty. I mean, why not?

I heard this story before and it might have been tracks from this "Anachronic" Jazz Band. It's a pity that this band only played a few years. Stereojack identfied this track.

Well, this is the first half. Be back later with the second part with a lot that hasn't been identified yet !

Keep swinging

Durium

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Thanks to Durium for the invitation to join in. It's been a while, but as usual, the traditional thanks and disclaimers remain firmly in place. And now, on with the show.

TRACK ELEVEN - Always glad to hear the Shiek (watch out though, there's been rumors out of Vegas that he'll sneak into your tent naked as a jaybird!)! Perfect mid-40s club fare, I should think. A little goes a long way, but in that day and in those places, that's what the purpose would have been, right? Beyond that, it gets wearying pretty fast, but no need to worry about that on a BFT, is there now!

TRACK TWELVE - "Solitude", of course. I love this tune. Bassist seems to have been touched by Mingus (which is not necessarily the same as having been "influenced" by him). That fatass tone puts me in mind of Red Mitchell, who was one of the kings of fatass tones (at least on records...) Or maybe Ron Carter even? Ah, clarinet...a kinda stiff player, on this little hearing... Yeah, definitely Ron Carter, w/a 2nd bassist. Ron Carter has gotten (and deserved) a lot of shit over the years, but when the guy comes to play, he plays. I'm diggin' this one.

TRACK THIRTEEN - Great drumming (and great drum tuning) on the intro. After that, it's good enough. Interesting altoist, sounds like he's pushing himself to not just play licks, with inconsistent results. But that's the risks you take when improvising (and that's also a reason why few people truly improvise) But really, that drum intro is enough all by itself!

TRACK FOURTEEN - Ok, I think it's Bird tune, but the name escapes me. I've heard better, I've heard worse. At this point, I look at stuff like this as documents of where people were on their way to someplace else - either this zone only more fully realized or else some other zone altogether that they had to go through this one to get to. Or. occasionally, on their way out altogether. My hunch is that with this player it's one of the first two. But it's almost like you can hear/feel how the weight of trying to channel, hell, just remembering, Bird's/Bud's vocabulary is weighing on them, almost like a 250 pound weight on your stomach, yeah you can support it, and yeah you can still breathe, but not like you could if it wasn't there.

TRACK FIFTEEN - Great song, "With a Song In My Heart"! Very in the Brown/Roach/Rollins bag, and very cooking too...sounds to me like they come by it honestly enough. Tenor playing occasionally betrays some "schoolboy" lickage, but hides it very well. I could almost go George Coleman on this one, actually....almost. If there were more examples of this, the "it doesn't matter how old a style you play in" argument would be easier made! KUDOS TO THE DRUMMER! And the pianist's comp. These ain't no kids, and they ain't no Dictaphones either.

TRACK SIXTEEN - "Our Love Is Here To Stay", Not sure that the "duetting" is working for me as well as having them play separately might have. Mr. Piano Player is a treat, though. Roger Kellaway? Roland Haana, even? Nice!

TRACK SEVENTEEN - "Evidence". Went from not caring for it to liking it about halfway through...Funny thing, once they get going, if you could isolate the pianist's right hand and the drummer, what you'd be left with would be not at all out of place on an early fusion record! That whole motivic/pentatonic thing that sprung from Trane went into "straight ahead" & fusion jazzs both, and now they've kinda come back into one thing for many players...Kenny Barron used to play a lot like this, but I don't think that this is him...could be, though...

TRACK EIGHTEEN - Not a tune with which I've ever shared much passion...and I'm afraid the same holds true for this rendition, as fine as it is. I'll take the Sinatra/Basie version and be done with it. Thanks anyway!

TRACK NINETEEN - But of course! :g

All told, an enjoyable collection of heretofore unknown and unheard titles. Thanks for inviting me in, Durium, it was fun!

TRACK ELEVEN - Always glad to hear the Shiek (watch out though, there's been rumors out of Vegas that he'll sneak into your tent naked as a jaybird!)! Perfect mid-40s club fare, I should think. A little goes a long way, but in that day and in those places, that's what the purpose would have been, right? Beyond that, it gets wearying pretty fast, but no need to worry about that on a BFT, is there now!

Well, you'll have to watch out for this snake .............. as you'll be surprised who plays it !! Alex. dentified this Canadian snake .....

TRACK TWELVE - "Solitude", of course. I love this tune. Bassist seems to have been touched by Mingus (which is not necessarily the same as having been "influenced" by him). That fatass tone puts me in mind of Red Mitchell, who was one of the kings of fatass tones (at least on records...) Or maybe Ron Carter even? Ah, clarinet...a kinda stiff player, on this little hearing... Yeah, definitely Ron Carter, w/a 2nd bassist. Ron Carter has gotten (and deserved) a lot of shit over the years, but when the guy comes to play, he plays. I'm diggin' this one.

You're righ in saying that one of the bass players is Ron Carter. A great one - I heard him last summer in Rotterdam in a concert to promote his Dear Miles album. This track is not from that album Who's the other bass player and who's the clarinet player. It's not a regular CD recording or live show, where you are listening to. Maybe you know for what purpose this track was made.

TRACK THIRTEEN - Great drumming (and great drum tuning) on the intro. After that, it's good enough. Interesting altoist, sounds like he's pushing himself to not just play licks, with inconsistent results. But that's the risks you take when improvising (and that's also a reason why few people truly improvise) But really, that drum intro is enough all by itself!

The drummer is really a great one and rather famous in this part of the world, but you should know him in the States too, I guess. He even played at the Neweport Jazz Festival in 1966, I believe. And the alto saxophone player is a rising star too in this part of the world, but from a younger generation.

TRACK FOURTEEN - Ok, I think it's Bird tune, but the name escapes me. I've heard better, I've heard worse. At this point, I look at stuff like this as documents of where people were on their way to someplace else - either this zone only more fully realized or else some other zone altogether that they had to go through this one to get to. Or. occasionally, on their way out altogether. My hunch is that with this player it's one of the first two. But it's almost like you can hear/feel how the weight of trying to channel, hell, just remembering, Bird's/Bud's vocabulary is weighing on them, almost like a 250 pound weight on your stomach, yeah you can support it, and yeah you can still breathe, but not like you could if it wasn't there.

This one seems to be rather difficult for al of you. some all it a Monk tune; others a Bird composition. It's none of that. The piano player composed it himself. Maybe I should give you some hints about this track - 1. The piano player passed away a few yearsago. 2. The piano player has been rather unknown, even in his own country.

TRACK FIFTEEN - Great song, "With a Song In My Heart"! Very in the Brown/Roach/Rollins bag, and very cooking too...sounds to me like they come by it honestly enough. Tenor playing occasionally betrays some "schoolboy" lickage, but hides it very well. I could almost go George Coleman on this one, actually....almost. If there were more examples of this, the "it doesn't matter how old a style you play in" argument would be easier made! KUDOS TO THE DRUMMER! And the pianist's comp. These ain't no kids, and they ain't no Dictaphones either.

Glad you like it - so do I. I heard this band in concert last year !! No, it isn't George Coleman, but the style (not the recording !) is, I agree, from the1950s

TRACK SIXTEEN - "Our Love Is Here To Stay", Not sure that the "duetting" is working for me as well as having them play separately might have. Mr. Piano Player is a treat, though. Roger Kellaway? Roland Haana, even? Nice!

No, the piano man is not Roger Kellaway nor Roland Hanna. He's from Italy, so this might help you a bit, maybe.

TRACK SEVENTEEN - "Evidence". Went from not caring for it to liking it about halfway through...Funny thing, once they get going, if you could isolate the pianist's right hand and the drummer, what you'd be left with would be not at all out of place on an early fusion record! That whole motivic/pentatonic thing that sprung from Trane went into "straight ahead" & fusion jazzs both, and now they've kinda come back into one thing for many players...Kenny Barron used to play a lot like this, but I don't think that this is him...could be, though...

No, it isn't Kenny Barron. I could have seen this band last year, but I was to tired - now it's too late :winky:

TRACK EIGHTEEN - Not a tune with which I've ever shared much passion...and I'm afraid the same holds true for this rendition, as fine as it is. I'll take the Sinatra/Basie version and be done with it. Thanks anyway!

Snoozer identified this English vocalist. I was surprised when I heard her on record for the very first time !!

Thanks JSngry for your suggestions. Hope you will be surprised when you read the answers.

Keep swinging

Durium

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Glad to see I added to the total of i.d.'d tracks :) -- Takase is a pretty interesting pianist--I know her duo with Conny Bauer (saw them live), the very interesting trio disc on Leo with Aleks Kolkowski & Tony Buck, & the OK disc of covers on Psi.

5: not my thing, I'm afraid!

6: some blistering playing on uke, I believe. Pretty damn amazing.

7: odd phrase structure to this tune, which keeps making me think it's losing half a bar at one point. The guitarist is good, & I liked the somewhat strange (non-Grappelliish) violin playing with (sorry I'm not one for technical terms) the quirky bow weight & phrasing.

8: hm, electric bass?? aside from questions of instrumentation, this is so terribly unswinging I can't take it. & what's with this non-solo by the tenor? At points this is so clunky that I assume these guys are doing it deliberately..... I hope??

9: I'm no expert in this kind of traditionalist jazz but, yeah, I liked this track.

10: I like the way the trumpet straightens out the kinks in Dizzy's break...! This is knowing stylistic reversion, but, yeah, it's fun & it's done well--the rising harmony in the last chorus is a nice touch.

[more to come]

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Glad to see I added to the total of i.d.'d tracks :) -- Takase is a pretty interesting pianist--I know her duo with Conny Bauer (saw them live), the very interesting trio disc on Leo with Aleks Kolkowski & Tony Buck, & the OK disc of covers on Psi.

5: not my thing, I'm afraid!

6: some blistering playing on uke, I believe. Pretty damn amazing.

7: odd phrase structure to this tune, which keeps making me think it's losing half a bar at one point. The guitarist is good, & I liked the somewhat strange (non-Grappelliish) violin playing with (sorry I'm not one for technical terms) the quirky bow weight & phrasing.

8: hm, electric bass?? aside from questions of instrumentation, this is so terribly unswinging I can't take it. & what's with this non-solo by the tenor? At points this is so clunky that I assume these guys are doing it deliberately..... I hope??

9: I'm no expert in this kind of traditionalist jazz but, yeah, I liked this track.

10: I like the way the trumpet straightens out the kinks in Dizzy's break...! This is knowing stylistic reversion, but, yeah, it's fun & it's done well--the rising harmony in the last chorus is a nice touch.

[more to come]

Thanks Nate for your new list of suggestions. Let's go .....

6: some blistering playing on uke, I believe. Pretty damn amazing.

Thanks for the nice words to the "guitar player"Ton van Bergeyk. Snoozer already identified this "ghuitar" player, now active in the Dutch Swing College Band. The tune ( and the ukulele, in fact a cavaquinho, has all to do with Oscar alemán, the Argentine guitar player, we commemorate next month that he was born 100 years ago. You can read all about it at Oscar Alemán (1909-2009)

7: odd phrase structure to this tune, which keeps making me think it's losing half a bar at one point. The guitarist is good, & I liked the somewhat strange (non-Grappelliish) violin playing with (sorry I'm not one for technical terms) the quirky bow weight & phrasing.

This track was also identified by Snoozer as a recording by Leo Slab, who passed away a year ago, playing in "a traditional way" in a "modern" Hot Club setting.

8: hm, electric bass?? aside from questions of instrumentation, this is so terribly unswinging I can't take it. & what's with this non-solo by the tenor? At points this is so clunky that I assume these guys are doing it deliberately..... I hope??

Most people don't like the elctric bass :winky:

10: I like the way the trumpet straightens out the kinks in Dizzy's break...! This is knowing stylistic reversion, but, yeah, it's fun & it's done well--the rising harmony in the last chorus is a nice touch.

you recognized this as "something old something new". It was already identificated by Stereojack.

Thanks so-far. I'm looking forward too your last "selection" suggestions.

Keep swinging

Durium

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Truthfully, it's not the electric bass that bothers me, but just the general rhythmic feel of the track--it just seems really flat and untogether. Well, maybe I'll have 2nd thoughts once the identity of the players is revealed..........

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Apologies for the late response. Was bedridden for much of the holiday and now I'm heading out of town for a few days. I listened 2-3 times while at work, but wouldn't you know it I left my notes there (not that they'd be much help anyway). But I wanted to get a few comments down before I go. I recognized a few tracks of course ("When You Wish Upon a Star," "Salt Peanuts") but don't think I could identify any players with any certainty. Overall, I found the disc to be loads of fun - perhaps even too much fun as a few tracks veered toward humor if not outright parody - but even that I found refreshing. Will try to add a few more comments when I get back.

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"excuse me but...if you define this T Monk as "great" how would you call the divine and sublime "LIBERACE"????LIberace was and remain the greatest of the gratest piano player who ever lived!!!!!!!" - youtube comment

Wow. Somebody should send that guy the links to Hans Groiner!

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Apologies for the late response. Was bedridden for much of the holiday and now I'm heading out of town for a few days. I listened 2-3 times while at work, but wouldn't you know it I left my notes there (not that they'd be much help anyway). But I wanted to get a few comments down before I go. I recognized a few tracks of course ("When You Wish Upon a Star," "Salt Peanuts") but don't think I could identify any players with any certainty. Overall, I found the disc to be loads of fun - perhaps even too much fun as a few tracks veered toward humor if not outright parody - but even that I found refreshing. Will try to add a few more comments when I get back.

Thanks for your nice words. I'll be ready to shoot on it, when you're back home !!

Keep swinging

Durium

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TRACK FOUR - "People" and, I'm assuming, Bill Evans. Not a huge fan of either song or pianist, but I do dig the reharmonization he does here. And I must say that my lack of passion for Evans is over the long-term. An occasional exposure here and there always works nice, Only now that we get into it, I'm not so sure that this is Evans! Either way, I like the reharmonization, but find the soloing quite pedestrian.

Seeing this reminded me of Jim's guess on my BFT (when the answer really WAS Bill Evans), which had me on the floor in hysterics:

TRACK SIXTEEN - "Second Time Around"...sounds like Oscar Peterson...my opinion remains the same as the first time around. But good god, when people complain about "the dreaded bass direct", hey, this is Exhibit A right here... Oh wait, that left hand, now it sounds like Bill Evans... Yeah, it's Bill Evans. The stiffness of the opening statement & the "swing" of the opening lines had me thinking Peterson, funny how that works, but soon enough the Evansosity of it all became apparent. Peterson or Evans, such a choice, what is this, the Piano Players You're Supposed To Love But Sangrey Doesn't Have Any Use For part of our test? :g

Still :rofl: !!!

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TRACK FOUR - "People" and, I'm assuming, Bill Evans. Not a huge fan of either song or pianist, but I do dig the reharmonization he does here. And I must say that my lack of passion for Evans is over the long-term. An occasional exposure here and there always works nice, Only now that we get into it, I'm not so sure that this is Evans! Either way, I like the reharmonization, but find the soloing quite pedestrian.

Seeing this reminded me of Jim's guess on my BFT (when the answer really WAS Bill Evans), which had me on the floor in hysterics:

TRACK SIXTEEN - "Second Time Around"...sounds like Oscar Peterson...my opinion remains the same as the first time around. But good god, when people complain about "the dreaded bass direct", hey, this is Exhibit A right here... Oh wait, that left hand, now it sounds like Bill Evans... Yeah, it's Bill Evans. The stiffness of the opening statement & the "swing" of the opening lines had me thinking Peterson, funny how that works, but soon enough the Evansosity of it all became apparent. Peterson or Evans, such a choice, what is this, the Piano Players You're Supposed To Love But Sangrey Doesn't Have Any Use For part of our test? :g

Still :rofl: !!!

B4930TrumpetStatue_d581_thumb.JPG

I once heard someone, who pointed to one of those small wooden jazz trumpet players you can buy in antique shops (mostly as a group), that the man who was playing the trumpet was Duke Ellington? I said, "You sure? - Yes, sure it's Duke Ellington - what do you know about it?

Discussion closed. :excited:

Keep swinging

Durium

Edited by Durium

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Gotta say, though, that "I like the reharmonization, but find the soloing quite pedestrian" sums up how I feel about a lot of both Evans & Guaraldi, allowing for a tad of conversational color & such.

Edited by JSngry

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Gotta say, though, that "I like the reharmonization, but find the soloing quite pedestrian" sums up how I feel about a lot of both Evans & Guaraldi, allowing for a tad of conversational color & such.

But they are very good choices for when the wife tells you to put on some dinner music for the guests to enjoy. Although I almost always go with the MJQ 'Last Concert' or the solo Kenny Barron set 'Spiral' in those cases.

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Gotta say, though, that "I like the reharmonization, but find the soloing quite pedestrian" sums up how I feel about a lot of both Evans & Guaraldi, allowing for a tad of conversational color & such.

But they are very good choices for when the wife tells you to put on some dinner music for the guests to enjoy. Although I almost always go with the MJQ 'Last Concert' or the solo Kenny Barron set 'Spiral' in those cases.

I try Turrentine's Salt Song first and then see if it evolves or devolves from there...

Funny story though, kinda. I was over for dinner to a friend's house a while back, great cook, even greater bassist, and I brought along the MJQ's Space, you know, the one on Apple that gets a little trippy on Side One. Well, ok, I put it on. The guests are all musicians, some (too many, I'd say now, with the passage of time...) tragically hip, and sure enough this one guy starts mocking, "Oh great, we get invited over to eat, then here comes the goddamned MODERN...JAZZ...QUARTET. Now we're at a freakin' DINNER PARTY!"

Well, we get into that Side One (which is where all the trippy stuff happens), & I shoot this guy a look and a raised eyebrow. He catches the gesture and says, "Hey, we're still at a freakin' dinner party. But it's a pretty hip dinner party, at least for now".

We both shared a laugh, did a line or two, and went out and shot pistols in the air at random intervals to celebrate our unbridled virility and unfathomably superior taste. A passerby or two might have gotten winged, but a life without surprises and random dangers is not worth living, right?

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