paul secor

One Classical Recording You'd Like Others To Hear

23 posts in this topic

I saw a newspaper article some months ago in which musicians, critics, composers, and conductors were asked to choose one classical music recording that they love and would like to share with others. Some of the choices were interesting, others, less so (at least, imo).
I thought we could do as well or better here. So, if anyone's up for it, please list one classical recording that you love and think that others might also.

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Barber's "Adagio for Strings" conducted by Thomas Schippers with the New York Philharmonic, 1965. I first heard this in a record store in 1996 or 1997. I stood there stunned and literally had to wipe away a few tears. Of course, I walked out with the CD, even though at the time I already had three other recordings of the piece.

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31 minutes ago, jeffcrom said:

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Barber's "Adagio for Strings" conducted by Thomas Schippers with the New York Philharmonic, 1965. I first heard this in a record store in 1996 or 1997. I stood there stunned and literally had to wipe away a few tears. Of course, I walked out with the CD, even though at the time I already had three other recordings of the piece.

Yes, yes, yes!! I got this on a CBS lp in the late '60s.

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I could list 20 with a bit of thought, but I'll start with 3 symphonies (here's the first one, and I'll post the others in coming days)...

Symphony No. 2, Op. 19 is a three-movement work for orchestra by American composer Samuel Barber. The 25-minute work was originally written in 1944. The work underwent many revisions and was finally published in 1950. The original manuscript was withdrawn by Barber in 1964. He ordered that G. Schirmer destroy(!) the original manuscript and all scores in their library. The work remained unpublished for many years until 1984 when a set of parts turned up in a warehouse in England. Renewed interest in Barber's work led to a 1990 reprint of the 1950 edition.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._2_(Barber)

The best recording I've yet found is this probably this one (Neeme Jarvi, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, recorded in 1991).

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Same recording, earlier release...

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Posted (edited)

As previous posters mentioned it is really hard to single out one release but here we go .... :

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I`m a dedicated follower of Sviatoslav Richter and this 11 CD Box captures the first public performances on North American soil. At that time Sviatoslav Richter was in his early prime and the two (out of seven) are either mainly (First recital :: October 19th, 1960) or completely (Sixth recital : December 23rd, 1960) dedicated to Beethoven Piano Sonatas. He performs these - without any safety net or second bottom - splendidly (listen his Sonata 23 “Appassionata” from October 19th, 1960 !!)

PS 1 Omitting his stand-out Beethoven abilities Richter deals with other composeres (Chopin, Rachmaninov, Prokofiev etc) extremely well

PS 2 Amazon.com has this already as "Temporarily out of stock" 

Edited by soulpope

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Constant Lambert - Romeo & Juliet an other works (on Hyperion)

Inventive music. Abundance of great melodies. The flow is seamless, it all develops so naturally. Lambert should definitely be better known, IMHO he is easily on par with somebody like Prokofiev. 

Here is a Hyperion link with generous samples: https://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/dc.asp?dc=D_CDA67545 . The CD costs just 5 pounds ;) .      

 

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Landmark recording of both Janacek string quartets - written by the composer at his creatice peak in the early 1920`s - by this aptly named ensemble from 1964 .... reissued as CD only in Japan and in 2000 by Supraphon (both deleted)

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but various vinyl editions are on offer via the usual sourcels ....

Btw a close second performance .... :

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and reissued 

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Posted (edited)

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Charles Ives: Songs / Jan DeGaetani (mez-sop), Gilbert Kalish (p) (Nonesuch)
Were I to choose a handful of my favorite recordings (in any genre), this would certainly be on the list.

If you'd like to read what I've written about this music on my Charles Ives site, go here.

 

Edited by HutchFan

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Ives - great. Will check this one. 

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Posted (edited)

Here the second Symphony that I'd recommend...

William Levi Dawson, Negro Folk Symphony (1934)

http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p_mla_apa_research_citation/2/0/7/1/2/p207125_index.html

  • From its premier in 1934 to its revision in 1952, the Negro Folk Symphony composed by William Levi Dawson captured first the stylistic traits of African American music or during Dawsons time, Negro folk music, namely the spiritual and jazz. In 1952, however, after travel to West Africa Dawson revised the symphony to include African musical traits, namely in its rhythm. Whereas the events of his life implanted the emotive meanings of the Negro spiritual and the necessities of his life ensured early employment as a jazz musician, Dawson sought to be recognized as a classical composer of merit. From his school days at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama and his travels to West Africa in 1952 Dawson became immersed not only in the musical language of Africans, but also the sociology and culture of Africans.

MORE GOOD INFO ON DAWSON HERE:  https://www.allclassical.org/black-history-month-william-levi-dawson/

Again, Neeme Jarvi (and the Detroit Symphony) -- these are the same recording, and there are some other budget releases with more generic covers out there too (Jarvi/Detroit), all the same.  It's a really stunner!  I've never heard it in a concert hall, but I can't imagine it wouldn't go over incredibly well, and it's a terrible shame it isn't programmed more (and hardly seems to be programmed ever).

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https://www.discogs.com/Dawson-Ellington-Detroit-Symphony-Orchestra-Neeme-J%C3%A4rvi-Negro-Folk-Symphony-Suite-From-The-River-So/release/3061743

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https://www.discogs.com/William-Grant-Still-William-Levi-Dawson-Duke-Ellington-Detroit-Symphony-Orchestra-Neeme-J%C3%A4rvi-Symph/release/10921602

Edited by Rooster_Ties

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Stefan Wolpe Chamber Piece No. 1
 

 

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Two is more than one, but today is not yesterday:

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another day, tabula rasa

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there's some flayva.

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28 minutes ago, JSngry said:

another day, tabula rasa

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there's some flayva.

Doesn't get any better.

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Re: Furtwangler's 1942 Beethoven 9th, I know music transcends, etc. but I have a hard time with the idea of Germans singing "Alle Menschen Werden Bruder" in 1942 when their relatives and neighbors are committing genocide in their name. It's a sick joke, not uplifting. 

Here's my recommendation:

(And I know FiDi served in the Wehrmacht on the Eastern Front. He probably saw, and may have participated in, some horrifying things, which makes this combination of composition and performance so much more the chilling.)

 

Edited by Hoppy T. Frog

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Earlier today .... :

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Edit : Actually posted in the wrong thread .... this is nevertheless a Mahler 2 masterfuly executed by Rafeal Kubelik - in his later golden days - with the SOBR .... and it would be hard to find better voices than Edith Mathis + Brigitte Fassbaender .... gorgeous music indeed ....

Edited by soulpope

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9 hours ago, Hoppy T. Frog said:

Re: Furtwangler's 1942 Beethoven 9th, I know music transcends, etc. but I have a hard time with the idea of Germans singing "Alle Menschen Werden Bruder" in 1942 when their relatives and neighbors are committing genocide in their name. It's a sick joke, not uplifting.

I don't find it a joke at all, sick or otherwise, nor do I find it uplifting. I find it terrifying. Furtwangler's reading here is, to me, the sound of a man having being twisted in all directions and having one big silent scream of agony.

I have a different edition than the one shown, one from Japan, one that is bookended by the radio announcer of the time. It is perhaps more creepy than the music is terrifying.

I would want to share it to remind us that art alone is not enough to stop evil determined. That's a lesson that keeps coming back.

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Edited by Dave James

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There might be more polished or more terse Bruckner 5 performances, but here - under the guidance of bold Lovro von Matacic - the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra are riding the storm .... you never feel comfortable until the Adagio`s majestic ending .... btw both the Czech woodwinds and brass are simply sensational here  ....

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Just one? That's real hard. But then: a disc of solo piano pieces by Déodat De Séverac - but only this recording: Jean-Joël Barbier breathes that music!

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I have a different edition, it is on a defunct French label, Accord.

 

Edited by mikeweil

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