23 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Hi all-

I’m excited to have curated this month’s (August 2020) collection of tracks. I’ve tried my best to include things that I’m currently digging as well as some gems from my past. 

thanks to Thom Keith for helping me with all the logistics! 

I hope you guys enjoy the music.


http://thomkeith.net/index.php/blindfold-tests/

Edited by eklaxton

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Welcome aboard, Cap'n!

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Welcome and thank you for compiling this month's BFT.  

I am not sure if it has ever happened before but you went the longest (tracks 1-6) among recent BFTs without forcing me to say "NEXT" and hit the forward button, so that is appreciated.

I can also say that there are at least two tunes I recognize but can't name, and felt like a couple of others played around the melody but wouldn't come out and state it, so I look forward to having other participants relieve me of that curiosity.

I don't guess very often on these but will go with Roy Hargrove on Track 5.

A word on programming that you should definitely take or ignore as you wish: I'd have programmed the solo piano last, as a final slow tune to end on. Better to start with some swinging, and I'd have shifted everything up one, or led off with track 5. But that's just me - who tends to obsessively program his own BFTs.

Thanks again and I hope you continue to participate both here and elsewhere on the board. :tup

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Track 1: "In My Solitude"

Track 2: "Dinah"

Track 3: Monk's "Ask Me Now"

Track 4: Ben Webster

Track 5: Rollins composition?

Track 6: Joe Lovano?

Track 7: Joe Henderson

Track 8: Dave Brubeck's "In Your Own Sweet Way" played by Jerry Bergonzi.

 

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Posted (edited)

   1)     This is “Solitude” played solo and with a great touch and sensitivity.  I don’t listen to a lot of solo piano (mainly Tyner and Weston), and I don’t have any idea who this is.  But it is a lovely performance.

 

2)     That’s a curious piece; I don’t know what of make of the vocal opening. Then it’s full-blown New Orleans, though almost certainly a very modern or recent recording.  It made me think of Wynton Marsalis, but I doubt it.  However you regard him, he is a more distinctive player than this.  But it is a fun little performance.

 

3)     “Ask Me Now”—Monk masterpiece!  Others besides Lacy can do Monk solo.  This guy sounds quite masterful.  It reminds me of Joe Henderson, but is more likely someone who has Joe as a pretty significant influence.

 

4)     “The Single Petal of a Rose”—Ellington masterpiece.  That’s Ben Webster.  I don’t think I’ve heard Ben perform this before, but it is unquestionably him.

 

5)     This is “Valse Hot.”  I believe Sonny wrote this one and performed it with Clifford Brown. This comes from the Roy Hargrove album with various tenor players.  Is it Branford and the more obscure Ron Blake?  I think Roy has the standout solo.

 

6)     Joe Lovano…that was clear within seconds. I can listen to Lovano on ballads all day.  Not sure what this is.  The drummer makes me think of Bill Stewart, whom I have been checking out lately. But it doesn’t appear to be from Landmarks.  DeJohnette on drums?  This is likely an original—not a standard.  I have tons of Lovano; I should know this.

 

7)     Not sure here.  It certainly has a bit of a Blue Note sound; but whether it’s BN or not, it seems to come from the 70s.  Then again, some artists in the past couple of decades have been returning to this sound.  I kind of like it, especially the tenor solo. Joe Henderson?  I seem to have him on the brain.

 

8     “In Your Own Sweet Way.”  Biff F I probably correct on the artist. It’s pretty cool, but it does lose the sweetness.

 

9)  “Shenadoah” by Bill Frisell.  Talk about pure beauty!  This is the version found on Good Dog, Happy Man.  I saw/heard him do this live, and it was just about the greatest concert experience I’ve ever known!  Thanks for putting this on the BFT.   

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Milestones

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I thought Ben Webster on that track but didn't hear enough breathiness to call it. Shame on me if I was wrong.

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Posted (edited)

      10) Good modern tenor—perhaps Joshua Redman or Chris Potter.  Or  it could be someone lesser known. 

 

11)     Catchy little piece.  It has some of those Americana qualities found in Bill Frisell and Charlie Hunter.  Mark Feldman on violin?  In any case, not bad.  I like the violin as a change of pace in jazz. 

 

12)     Somehow this reminds me of Henry Threadgill or Art Ensemble of Chicago.  Just the joyous rhythm of it.  This is played very straight and doesn’t really have avant garde elements.  Nice spirited performance to close out the BFT!

 

I really love this Blindfold Test.  Clearly we have pretty similar jazz tastes.

 

Edited by Milestones

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Yes, #7 is Joe Henderson, the title track to "Power to the People", 1969 on Milestone.  Great stuff, and couldn't get any more in my wheelhouse than that!

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Solitude has a verse?

Who knew?

Dinah also has a verse? I did not know that!

That's Melissa Aldana playing "Solitude", not sure that's what I want to hear, but outstanding command of the instrument across all registers!

Definitely Ben doing "Single Petal..." originally released on an impulse! sampler, a "leftover" (HA!) form the See You at The Fair album.

R-875494-1336966332-7374.jpeg.jpg

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Track 3 is 'Ask Me Now' (as recognised above) by the Chilean sax player Melissa Aldana from her Crash Trio album.

Track 11, (agreed, a catchy piece), is bass player Ben Allison from his album 'Think Free'. It's the opening track,"Fred', with Shane Endsley on trumpet and Jenny Scheinman on violin (the Americana connection). A great album for a summer day, feel good jazz!

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On 8/1/2020 at 2:59 PM, Dan Gould said:

Welcome and thank you for compiling this month's BFT.  

I am not sure if it has ever happened before but you went the longest (tracks 1-6) among recent BFTs without forcing me to say "NEXT" and hit the forward button, so that is appreciated.

I can also say that there are at least two tunes I recognize but can't name, and felt like a couple of others played around the melody but wouldn't come out and state it, so I look forward to having other participants relieve me of that curiosity.

I don't guess very often on these but will go with Roy Hargrove on Track 5.

A word on programming that you should definitely take or ignore as you wish: I'd have programmed the solo piano last, as a final slow tune to end on. Better to start with some swinging, and I'd have shifted everything up one, or led off with track 5. But that's just me - who tends to obsessively program his own BFTs.

Thanks again and I hope you continue to participate both here and elsewhere on the board. :tup

Thanks for the feedback. I had one order for the tracks that book-ended with solo performances. I’m not entirely sure how I landed on this order but I think I was trying to create a general sense of building throughout. Looking back I probably would have preferred spacing out the two solo performances more. 

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On 8/1/2020 at 3:37 PM, Milestones said:

   1)     This is “Solitude” played solo and with a great touch and sensitivity.  I don’t listen to a lot of solo piano (mainly Tyner and Weston), and I don’t have any idea who this is.  But it is a lovely performance.

 

2)     That’s a curious piece; I don’t know what of make of the vocal opening. Then it’s full-blown New Orleans, though almost certainly a very modern or recent recording.  It made me think of Wynton Marsalis, but I doubt it.  However you regard him, he is a more distinctive player than this.  But it is a fun little performance.

 

3)     “Ask Me Now”—Monk masterpiece!  Others besides Lacy can do Monk solo.  This guy sounds quite masterful.  It reminds me of Joe Henderson, but is more likely someone who has Joe as a pretty significant influence.

 

4)     “The Single Petal of a Rose”—Ellington masterpiece.  That’s Ben Webster.  I don’t think I’ve heard Ben perform this before, but it is unquestionably him.

 

5)     This is “Valse Hot.”  I believe Sonny wrote this one and performed it with Clifford Brown. This comes from the Roy Hargrove album with various tenor players.  Is it Branford and the more obscure Ron Blake?  I think Roy has the standout solo.

 

6)     Joe Lovano…that was clear within seconds. I can listen to Lovano on ballads all day.  Not sure what this is.  The drummer makes me think of Bill Stewart, whom I have been checking out lately. But it doesn’t appear to be from Landmarks.  DeJohnette on drums?  This is likely an original—not a standard.  I have tons of Lovano; I should know this.

 

7)     Not sure here.  It certainly has a bit of a Blue Note sound; but whether it’s BN or not, it seems to come from the 70s.  Then again, some artists in the past couple of decades have been returning to this sound.  I kind of like it, especially the tenor solo. Joe Henderson?  I seem to have him on the brain.

 

8     “In Your Own Sweet Way.”  Biff F I probably correct on the artist. It’s pretty cool, but it does lose the sweetness.

 

9)  “Shenadoah” by Bill Frisell.  Talk about pure beauty!  This is the version found on Good Dog, Happy Man.  I saw/heard him do this live, and it was just about the greatest concert experience I’ve ever known!  Thanks for putting this on the BFT.   

 

 

 

 

 

1. The album this came from was the first of this guys playing that I had really checked out. He does all Ellington solo- I’ll try to provide album covers when I do the reveal so folks can get more of what they enjoy. 
 

2. This album is definitely a love letter to the tradition. It was real early in the artist’s career. 
 

3. there’s def a whole lotta Joe coming through in this. There’s a live performance of this player doing Without a Song and you can hear tons of Sonny. There’s so much history in their playing... def one of my favorite players out there today. 
 

4. Ive been getting more and more into Ben Webster. And I can’t get enough of this tune. The arrangement here is pleasantly loose as well. I was excited when I stumbled across this track last year. 
 

5. ive been trying to decide which tenor soloist is in which spot. When I was really young I thought it was just Branford in both spots. I’d be curious to see if we can generate a little spinoff discussion around just that!

 

6. he’s all around the melody but never really says it. Not usually a ballad. Drummer(s), I believe. I’ve listened to this a ton to hear how much space one must leave for the other in order for it to remain so subtle. 
 

7. There’s a live recording of this with Woody Shaw... I do wish he was on this record. Maybe one of the only things that could improve it. 
 

8. this showed up in my brothers CD collection when I was in middle school or early high-school. It took 15 years for me to get back around to it. So fiery!

 

9. Hearing that guitar in a room is def one of the coolest things I’ve had the pleasure of experiencing! 

On 8/1/2020 at 4:08 PM, Milestones said:

      10) Good modern tenor—perhaps Joshua Redman or Chris Potter.  Or  it could be someone lesser known. 

 

11)     Catchy little piece.  It has some of those Americana qualities found in Bill Frisell and Charlie Hunter.  Mark Feldman on violin?  In any case, not bad.  I like the violin as a change of pace in jazz. 

 

12)     Somehow this reminds me of Henry Threadgill or Art Ensemble of Chicago.  Just the joyous rhythm of it.  This is played very straight and doesn’t really have avant garde elements.  Nice spirited performance to close out the BFT!

 

I really love this Blindfold Test.  Clearly we have pretty similar jazz tastes.

 

10. This personnel line up sort of surprised me. For some reason I didn’t expect it to come together. I was very wrong. I’d be interested to see if folks could figure out each player. 
 

11. I’ve always loved this players writing. I figured it would be a breath of fresh air.

 

12. This is one of the least avante garde things I’ve heard this guy do. I love him dearly for his highly creative and exploratory ways. This track just feels so damn good, I landed here. I think it also obscures the band leaders identity a bit. I think folks would have gotten it right quick if I’d put one of his trio recordings up. 

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Alrighty, took longer to get to than I'd hoped.  Some stuff new to me on here, but a few bags.  One listen, spontaneous commentary, so... sorry.

Track 01 - Solitude.  Very patient version with solid nods to the composer.  Trying to think who does that in the right hand.  Tommy Flanagan came to mind but the voicings are wrong.  Seat-of-the-pants, I’m going to say Sir Roland Hanna.  [just saw a great mini-interview with David Murray where he talks about the importance of using different pianists because piano occupies so much space on a recording.  He said [loosely quote]: I’ve fired LOTS of guys.  I say it with pride, I’ve fired some of the best.  I fired John Hicks, I fired Don Pullen… I fired Roland Hanna.”]  Good stuff.  I believe this is from this.

Track 02 - Not someone I’m overly familiar with.  Pretty sure the trumpeter is the vocalist (definitely sounds like a player singing as opposed to a vocalist).  It certainly is tight.  Not sure how often I’d go to this well, but I appreciate it.

Track 03 - First reaction, my gut tells me that’s Big George.  Nope.  My gut was wrong.  Monk tune.  One of the few I’ll get by name.  Ask Me Now.  Believe I read somewhere that when he first recorded it he was asked the title and grunted “Don’t ask me now,” and the “don’t” went unheard.  Not sure if that’s true, but I love the story if it is.  Feel like I know the player, but it may just be the heavy George Coleman influence.  Very fluid, very facile.  HUGE Big George influence, but I’ve never heard George do those growls.  Most times I struggle on modern interpretations of Monk, but I like this one a lot.

Track 04 - Oh yeah, baby.  Two beautiful things:  Big Ben and a GREAT Ellington ballad, Single Petal of a Rose.  This is it  This is everything, we can all go home.  I’ve got it on this  but I know it’s on a couple of anthologies, as well.  Man, you’ve got some PIANO players on this BFT!

Track 05 - And a GREAT Newk tune — Valse Hot.  SUCH a great tune.  Something very Herbie about the piano and I’m not sure it fits with the tune.  Mmm.  Don’t care for where that went on the solos.  There’s doing it your own way, but not sure it’s always the best choice.  Once we get back to time, I’m liking it more.  Not fully loving the tenor.  A lot of those conservatory lines that don’t seem to have much to do with the tune (this is where I show I’m really a fussy prick).  Second tenor is much more to my liking.  First one is all about the notes and the math, but I’m not feeling the story.  Second one was all story.  Okay, that’s Roy Hargrove.  That’s a lot of clues.  I may actually have this.  I’m guessing first soloist was Branford, doing that thing that drives me nuts about him.  I know the album is various tenor players (I definitely have it, but can’t recall the title).  Too lazy to go look.  :D Can’t remember the other guy, but like I said, iirc, it’s shifting personnel throughout.  

Track 06 - Sounds like Joe Lovano.  Song is familiar but it’s eluding me.  Weird arrangement.  Definitely Joe.  I don’t always line-up with JL, but this one works.  Friggin’ song is going to drive me nuts — I KNOW this.  No.  Did he just quote Donna Lee?  Is that the friggin’ song!?  GAH!

Track 07 - Ooooo!  Rhodes less travelled.  Oh, that’s familiar.  Joe Henderson on tenor.  Joe fools nobody.  Took a bit, but it’s the title track from this.  

Track 08 - Lotta Coltrane there.  Ah, yes — that’s Jerry Bergonzi.  What is that friggin’ song?  It’s Brubeck, right?  [Love that video of JB with DB at the vineyard; heard some horror stories about that gig, but it’s a good video]  Not sure on those busy-ass drums, but could be Tain.  I don’t always love the stuff so directly out of Coltrane, but when Jerry is on, he’s ON.  He’s on, here.

Track 09 - Fields of Gold?  No.  Now it sounds like Danny Boy.  Nope.  Now it sounds like Ry Cooder.  No idea what this is.  Seems to be hitting lots of ‘ish’ pieces of various songs.  Or, perhaps I’m f****d.  :D

Track 10 - Love that bass.  Thought this was going in a different direction.  At first, felt very Johnny Dyani, but then turns more toward a Manfred Eicher feel, then moves to 80s Jazz.  At first I was thinking Chico Freeman on the tenor, now I’m leaning more towards a less-specific post-Coltrane voice.  Sure sounds like Brad Meldau on piano (so that narrows nothing down).  Good tune.   

Track 11 - Feeling like this might be a ringer.  Any chance this is an unreleased Chris Klaxton thing? :D Not completely sold that it’s him, but not completely discouraged from the guess, either.  Sounds like his writing to me.

Track 12 - Loved the 12/8 intro but it went somewhere I wasn’t expecting.  Goes where I’m not expecting, but touches on  some strange places that mostly make me happy.  A bit pedantic just shy of the 1 minute mark, but overall, really liking what it’s doing.  As it goes on, the only thing I’m sure of is I have no concept who this is.  Almost sounds like Ekaya, but it’s too spread out.  Can’t place the bari and that’s pissing me off.  That bouncing call between the horns is the only thing not really grabbing me.  The rest of it is a bop.  

Thanks for mixing in a few ringers along with the moments of abject torture where I had no idea.  ;)

 

 

 

 

 

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Now we have it--that is Joe Lovano playing "Donna Lee," which is of course usually uptempo.  It's found on the album Bird Songs.

 

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I love how the group is piecing this all together. 

The vocalist on Dinah is a trumpet player but not the trumpet player on the track. The record is a young mans nod to the tradition and a collaboration with his elder.

10 is a real sleeper album and like I said it’s an unusual collection of players. Brad is def playing piano tho. One of my favorite drummers sitting at the kit. He’s a special dude. And I’m seeing the bass player on more and more records in the last 5-10 years. He’s def one of New York’s go to guys. 
 

11 not a Klaxton piece but it is the guy that showed us the power of using simple triads. 
 

I was hoping Thom would get 12. That tenor sound is one and only! Tho the composition is not his regular setting. 

And you guys got Donna Lee! Maybe my favorite presentation of it ever! It’s like the Monet/Picasso version. 

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On 8/19/2020 at 3:25 PM, eklaxton said:

I was hoping Thom would get 12. That tenor sound is one and only! Tho the composition is not his regular setting. 

 

This comment has been keeping me up at night.  After repeated listening, it sounds like Bob Gulotti on drums, which suggests a Boston band, but I'm not getting the horn players.  *Could* be Kurtis Rivers on alto, but I don't think so.

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On 8/19/2020 at 2:25 PM, eklaxton said:

I love how the group is piecing this all together. 

The vocalist on Dinah is a trumpet player but not the trumpet player on the track. The record is a young mans nod to the tradition and a collaboration with his elder.

10 is a real sleeper album and like I said it’s an unusual collection of players. Brad is def playing piano tho. One of my favorite drummers sitting at the kit. He’s a special dude. And I’m seeing the bass player on more and more records in the last 5-10 years. He’s def one of New York’s go to guys. 
 

11 not a Klaxton piece but it is the guy that showed us the power of using simple triads. 
 

I was hoping Thom would get 12. That tenor sound is one and only! Tho the composition is not his regular setting. 

And you guys got Donna Lee! Maybe my favorite presentation of it ever! It’s like the Monet/Picasso version. 

I know that vocalist because I saw him live and he sang during that live performance. It is Doc Cheatham. 

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Posted (edited)

1. That is a really beautiful, compelling recording of Solitude. I hear Abdullah Ibrahim’s personal touches in several places, his unique stylist devices. I am not familiar with him recording Solitude like this though. His album “Ode to Duke Elllington” sounds different than this. 
 

2. I recognize Doc Cheatham’s singing. There is another trumpet player here. I have an album with Doc and Nicholas Payton which I have not played in years. It could be that. 
 

3. The style reminds me of Archie Shepp but the sound and ideas don’t really sound like him. This is really good and I don’t think I have it. I want to find out who it is in the Reveal. 
 

4. Single Petal of a Rose, a great Ellington composition, so beautiful. That is Ben Webster. I can’t remember which album this is from. 
 

5. A hard bop/mainstream take on a Monk tune.  It sounds like it was recorded after 1990. I think I have this but can’t place it. The trumpet player is extraordinary. 
 

6. I caught Donna Lee being played at the end. I really like the drummer on this track, as the playing is imaginative while staying in the pocket. . I know I have heard the tenor sax player before but am not sure who he is. A really nice recording. 

i will post my impressions of the rest soon. 

Edited by Hot Ptah

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Posted (edited)

Track 7. That is Joe Henderson. I have a box set, The Milestone Years, and this is on it. I don’t remember the musicians. I love the electric piano sound here. 
 

Track 8. The tenor saxophone player has absorbed all of John Coltrane and come out the other side with his own style. I like this a lot. I don’t know who it is but want to know! The song is “in Your Own Sweet Way.”

Track 9. That is obviously Bill Frisell, from one of his earlier albums I think. I used to buy each of his albums as they came out but somewhere along the line I stopped. I am pretty sure I have this one. This is a beautiful performance, really compelling, both as to Bill’s sound and his ideas. 
 

Track 10.  I really like the bass which begins this track. I have no idea who this is but it is really good. The tenor saxophonist is excellent. I am looking forward to the Reveal. 
 

Track 11. And now for something different. I like the composition, the arrangement, the performance. I want to buy this, when I learn what it is. There is a joy to this recording which appeals to me. 
 

Track 12. I have this and know it. It is George Garzone from his Moodiology album. I saw Joe Lovano live around 2000 with Steve Slagle and George Garzone in the band. I was so impressed with Slagle and Garzone that for a few years I bought several albums by both of them, including this one. Excellent!

i really enjoyed this Blindfold Test. Thanks for putting it together for us!

Edited by Hot Ptah

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On 8/26/2020 at 9:31 PM, Hot Ptah said:

I know that vocalist because I saw him live and he sang during that live performance. It is Doc Cheatham. 

Nice- exactly. He’s def in his old age here but there’s still some really beautiful phrasing in there. 

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On 8/28/2020 at 7:52 PM, Hot Ptah said:

Track 12. I have this and know it. It is George Garzone from his Moodiology album. I saw Joe Lovano live around 2000 with Steve Slagle and George Garzone in the band. I was so impressed with Slagle and Garzone that for a few years I bought several albums by both of them, including this one. Excellent!

i really enjoyed this Blindfold Test. Thanks for putting it together for us!

NOW all the comments make sense!  I was in the right neighborhood with Kurtis, at least.

 

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1. A nice florid solo piano version of In My Solitude.  I'm guessing Earl Hines, from his two Duke volumes.
2. We aren't sure we're headed in a jazz direction from the vocal intro, but the music takes over and corrects that impression.  With nothing to go on, I'll throw out Doc Cheatham just because I think he's a trumpeter who sings.
3. This one will probably surprise me.  Chopsy solo tenor that's not afraid to show off a breathy tone.  Definitely not off Sonny Rollins Solo Album, because both of the tracks there are side-long, and it's not considered among his best work.  Still, I can't come up with a better fit than Rollins. 
4. More breathy tone deployed beautifully, with piano to match.  Maybe Don Byas?
5. Maybe the Thad Jones-Mel Lewis big band with Billy Harper and Roland Hanna?
6.  The tenor's tone makes me think of Steeplechase era Dexter Gordon, but I'm not sure that the restless exploration of the rhythm section is consistent with that.
7. Could be Joe Henderson's Milestone period.  Definitely feels 70s.
8. Is this McCoy Tyner's album with Mike Brecker?  Was it called Infinity?  we have definitely settled into a tenor groove.
9. Nice and atmospheric, could be someone not normally considered a jazz perfomer.  I vaguely think I recognize the tune - Shenandoah?  Two wild guesses.  Bill Frisell or Craig Chaquico.
10. I'm a person who doesn't consider that an ECM reference is a bad thing at all, and this could easily be an ECM recording.  Charles Lloyd maybe?
11. Nice groove, but not particularly jazz based.  I'm guessing the violist or violinist is the leader.  Regina Carter?
12. Calypso feel.  I'll try Sonny Rollins again.  Nice Bari sax too.

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Joshua Redman has a new album with Brad Mehldau, Christian McBride and Brian Blade.  I've only heard it once, but I'm liking that group for #10 given the other clues.

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