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Ella's auto


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4 minutes ago, Dmitry said:

It's got an FM radio! I'm pretty sure the steering is hydraulic.

I don't know Dmitry. The listing here: https://scottgrundfor.com/for-sale-the-ella-fitzgerald-1959-mercedes-benz-300-d-cabriolet/?fbclid=IwAR2XC2nZ9scczRt9LXL3jyE1mXGG8brAxXosSliZBm5nLGLSC8I4coMInSw# It does not say that it does and the picture of the engine compartment shows what could be a power steering assist, but without it being listed, I tend to doubt it.

Look, I get it. I love old cars too. When I bought a 1965 Chevy Impala convertible, I was like a kid again. It brought back such great memories. I loved my old '65 Chevy. I had so much fun in one and I wanted that fun again. I even liked fixing it.

Then I bought one and started driving it. All of the "Well this sucks" stuff started coming back. The choke sticking. The gas cap leaking when you stepped on the gas too hard (remember those gas caps behind the rear license plate?). Then there's that first time you get cut off and try to lock up the brakes with no power brakes. That is when you find out if you would pass a cardiac stress test. Or the first time you exit a highway and hit a bump while turning at a high rate of speed and the bias ply tires try bouncing you off the road. When you get home, you'll find yourself shopping for replacement radial tires (which of course aren't available in the size you need). It's fun getting parts too. Especially when said parts don't exist - like an AC compressor that works without Freon.

I'm done. I'll still peruse the pictures and drool over it but I have zero interest in driving it.

I were to win the lottery, about the only classic car I would consider is a light blue Corvette with a white cove (56-62) but even then, I would probably just sit in it. I'd buy that 2021 convertible Lexus to drive. :)

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I'm just guessing the steering is power-assisted...car's got fuel injectors. On the other hand, the windows aren't power, they are manual. I don't know about the convertible top...one way to find out is to have one of our Claifornia people go check it out. 

8 minutes ago, bresna said:

I don't know Dmitry. The listing here: https://scottgrundfor.com/for-sale-the-ella-fitzgerald-1959-mercedes-benz-300-d-cabriolet/?fbclid=IwAR2XC2nZ9scczRt9LXL3jyE1mXGG8brAxXosSliZBm5nLGLSC8I4coMInSw# It does not say that it does and the picture of the engine compartment shows what could be a power steering assist, but without it being listed, I tend to doubt it.

Look, I get it. I love old cars too. When I bought a 1965 Chevy Impala convertible, I was like a kid again. It brought back such great memories. I loved my old '65 Chevy. I had so much fun in one and I wanted that fun again. I even liked fixing it.

Then I bought one and started driving it. All of the "Well this sucks" stuff started coming back. The choke sticking. The gas cap leaking when you stepped on the gas too hard (remember those gas caps behind the rear license plate?). Then there's that first time you get cut off and try to lock up the brakes with no power brakes. That is when you find out if you would pass a cardiac stress test. Or the first time you exit a highway and hit a bump while turning at a high rate of speed and the bias ply tires try bouncing you off the road. When you get home, you'll find yourself shopping for replacement radial tires (which of course aren't available in the size you need). It's fun getting parts too. Especially when said parts don't exist - like an AC compressor that works without Freon.

I'm done. I'll still peruse the pictures and drool over it but I have zero interest in driving it.

I were to win the lottery, about the only classic car I would consider is a light blue Corvette with a white cove (56-62) but even then, I would probably just sit in it. I'd buy that 2021 convertible Lexus to drive. :)

This summer I test drove a 1979 Chevy El Camino with a 4 speed manual !!! I must admit it was truly a piece of shit, and like you said, friggin dangerous to everyone, even at 20mph I felt it wasn't my ride.  The seller wanted $9.5K. I couldn't even park the damn thing...

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43 minutes ago, JSngry said:

Not a convertible guy (had one, and oh, you think that's it's going to be cooler in the summer with the top down when it's 100+ outside? WRONG!!!!!)

Did it have black vinyl seats? My 65 Impala did. I once jumped in that car on a hot sunny day after the top was down for a few hours... with shorts on! I bet that car still has some of my DNA melted into that seat.

My old Chevy did have AC though. I have no problem driving with the top down on a hot day with the AC cranking. The two are not mutually exclusive.

11 minutes ago, Dmitry said:

I'm just guessing the steering is power-assisted...car's got fuel injectors. On the other hand, the windows aren't power, they are manual. I don't know about the convertible top...one way to find out is to have one of our Claifornia people go check it out. 

This summer I test drove a 1979 Chevy El Camino with a 4 speed manual !!! I must admit it was truly a piece of shit, and like you said, friggin dangerous to everyone, even at 20mph I felt it wasn't my ride.  The seller wanted $9.5K. I couldn't even park the damn thing...

Was it a stick or a column shifter? My dad had a 67 Chevy pickup with 3 on the tree. I learned to drive a manual in that truck.

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It was gray fabric seats. Seat temperature was not the issue. Air temperature was. A/C with the top down in Texas heat is useless.

The only time it was worth a damn was after dark, and then only WAAAAAY after dark. Rode back froim a few Rangers game that way and it was ok in spring and fall. Otherwise...

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18 minutes ago, bresna said:

Was it a stick or a column shifter? My dad had a 67 Chevy pickup with 3 on the tree. I learned to drive a manual in that truck.

Stick. Long throw, of course. I didn't get it into 4th.Didn't need to. It's like the car moved independent of the gear it was in. Just press the gas, and if it doesn't go, press harder. :D

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39 minutes ago, JSngry said:

It was gray fabric seats. Seat temperature was not the issue. Air temperature was. A/C with the top down in Texas heat is useless.

The only time it was worth a damn was after dark, and then only WAAAAAY after dark. Rode back froim a few Rangers game that way and it was ok in spring and fall. Otherwise...

I love driving with the top down on a hot Summer night. Nothing like it. I've had 3 ragtops and I miss that the most. What I don't miss is the constant smell of sunscreen, seats hot enough to fry an egg, road noise so loud you can't hear any music and having to wear a hat for every drive. :)

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Nice car.  I drive a '62 Studebaker.  Like just drove it downtown and back to pick something up an hour ago.  It has power brakes and steering but my '59 Stude did not.  Probably a lot more front heavy than that MB.  So no, it won't drive like a new car and I probably wouldn't use a car that expensive and rare as a daily driver.  But it can be done.  Modern radials pumped up half way hard will improve the steering.

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10 hours ago, danasgoodstuff said:

  Modern radials pumped up half way hard will improve the steering.

I found that this did help. My biggest problem was that my car used F78-15 (or was it G78-15>) tires. Modern radial tires are not available in that size so I had to get P215-R15 tires. After I installed them, the car drove much better but then I had an issue where the tires would rub on the frame when I turned the wheel full right or left. Luckily, you only ever do that in rare parking instances.

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12 hours ago, danasgoodstuff said:

Nice car.  I drive a '62 Studebaker.  Like just drove it downtown and back to pick something up an hour ago.  It has power brakes and steering but my '59 Stude did not.  Probably a lot more front heavy than that MB.  So no, it won't drive like a new car and I probably wouldn't use a car that expensive and rare as a daily driver.  But it can be done.  Modern radials pumped up half way hard will improve the steering.

Congrats and hats off, that Stude is an interesting car, and not one likely to be seen at every run-of-the-mill classic car meet (contrary to Tri-Chevies, Impalas, Camaros and the typical Fordlore, etc. :)).

I regularly drive Mopar offshoots that as it happens were also present on the US market - I own three from the range shown here:
https://barnfinds.com/1960-simca-aronde-elysee/virginia-23002

No, they don't drive like today's cars and you have to use common sense and exercise caution in traffic and really have to take them consciously into your hands (like any old car from that era) instead of just relying on a zillion of comfy gadgets but their size makes them VERY handy and whizzy in suburb traffic, contrary to many, many of those SUV pieces of shit totally ill-suited to European cities.

Edited by Big Beat Steve
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I pacified my mid-life crisis somewhat, by just recently purchasing a 2003 Acura RSX with a 5-speed standard transmission. I 'm really enjoying the "no light, beep or button for every occasion" feel. Just a relatively pure driving experience, with minimal electronic gadgetry. Drive is by wire. No rear camera, no touch screen, no parking sensors. Has a single disk cd player. I did bring in a portable Bluetooth speaker, so now I can listen to my podcasts, The original owner put only 63k on it, which equates to 3,700 miles per year, hauling clubs to and from local golf courses.  

A month and a half ago, during a major windstorm a huge tree branch landed on us when me and my son were in the car; impact caved in the roof, busted the moon roof. A $2000 body shop bill fixed that...replaced the whole moon roof assembly, including the motor, straightened, filled and painted the roof. I'd only put 300 miles on the car before it happened.  

IMG_7008[1]

The engine bay looks so clean...3,700 miles per year. Garaged every night and not driven in winters.

IMG_6886[1]

 

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@JSngry: Weeelll ... definitely about the cars as far as their suitability for the typical urban and suburban streets around here is concerned (many of these tanks are way too bloated for that), and coming to think of it (now that you raised that point ;)), a bit about those drivers/driveresses too who clearly are inept at handling their cars in a space-saving and smoothly advancing manner in these streets (to keep traffic flowing) because - though seated up on high in there - seem to be unable to see and understand where their cars begin and end. If you've seen them trying to maneuver their SUV monsters through suburban streets often laid out in the 30s/50s and OTOH recklessly parking them in a way that most of the times blocks TWO parking spaces then you have little respect, patience or sympathy with them. 

Though I do not expect all of the 'murricans to really understand that ... But the urban space situation very often just IS different here ...

Edited by Big Beat Steve
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4 minutes ago, Dan Gould said:

It's being offered at $20,000 less than the last sale price? :unsure:

I don't watch the car auctions on TV much or follow the market closely otherwise, but I have noticed some 'softness' in recent years and aging out and dying off is certainly a thing in car club circles with which I'm acquainted, @ 66 I'm on the younger end of my Studebaker club, there are people up to a full generation or more younger but most of them are older than me.

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3 hours ago, danasgoodstuff said:

I don't watch the car auctions on TV much or follow the market closely otherwise, but I have noticed some 'softness' in recent years and aging out and dying off is certainly a thing in car club circles with which I'm acquainted, @ 66 I'm on the younger end of my Studebaker club, there are people up to a full generation or more younger but most of them are older than me.

I'm 58 and as is obvious, I have lost my love for driving these older cars. I just can't believe that I am alone in this. If you do finally buy that classic car of your dreams, there may come a day when you putter out on a nice summer day and get out in the middle of nowhere and that vintage car breaks down and you think, "Damn... this is deja vu all over again". All of the faults that you forgot about when shopping for this classic piece of nostalgia will come flooding back. No one remembers the shortcomings. Only the good stuff.

Ever see one of those old Plymouths with the pushbutton automatic shifter? Cool huh? My grandmother once went to hit D and accidentally hit R. She was in a parking lot on top of a steep hill. She went over the edge but her back tires caught. That classic car "innovation" almost caused me to never be born. :)

FYI - my father restored Indian motorcycles. I still love the look of them. But at the same time, I remember the cookie sheet that he had to put underneath each bike in the garage to catch the oil as it dripped out. I remember having to go pick him when his bike died out on the road (not as often as his Harley buddies). And I remember him flooding the damn thing if he didn't get the choke and (manual) spark advance just right. The suicide foot clutch. The stick shift lever that sometimes got stuck in neutral going from 1st to 2nd. The left handed throttle that my dad always had to convert to the right side. The right hand manual spark advance that he had to swap over as well. They were finicky things. But again, they looked incredible. Would I want to drive one today? Nope.

 

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My wife's 2017 Nissan died the other day, turned out to just be a bad battery replaced on warranty (just days short of expiring, for once) and it was the '62 Studebaker that drove us out to retrieve it.  But it has died too, but I have a mechanic who makes side of the road and house calls and charges me like it's 1962 - if you can't find one of those, better learn to be one yourself.  As the meme says 'Owner's manuals used to tell you how to adjust the valves, now they tell you not to drink the anti-freeze!'

75380452_115840319871682_349620628206544

Edited by danasgoodstuff
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44 minutes ago, bresna said:

I'm 58 and as is obvious, I have lost my love for driving these older cars. I just can't believe that I am alone in this. If you do finally buy that classic car of your dreams, there may come a day when you putter out on a nice summer day and get out in the middle of nowhere and that vintage car breaks down and you think, "Damn... this is deja vu all over again". All of the faults that you forgot about when shopping for this classic piece of nostalgia will come flooding back. No one remembers the shortcomings. Only the good stuff.

Ever see one of those old Plymouths with the pushbutton automatic shifter? Cool huh? My grandmother once went to hit D and accidentally hit R. She was in a parking lot on top of a steep hill. She went over the edge but her back tires caught. That classic car "innovation" almost caused me to never be born. :)

FYI - my father restored Indian motorcycles. I still love the look of them. But at the same time, I remember the cookie sheet that he had to put underneath each bike in the garage to catch the oil as it dripped out. I remember having to go pick him when his bike died out on the road (not as often as his Harley buddies). And I remember him flooding the damn thing if he didn't get the choke and (manual) spark advance just right. The suicide foot clutch. The stick shift lever that sometimes got stuck in neutral going from 1st to 2nd. The left handed throttle that my dad always had to convert to the right side. The right hand manual spark advance that he had to swap over as well. They were finicky things. But again, they looked incredible. Would I want to drive one today? Nope.

 

Hey, let's go buy a bunch of vinyl!

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The car would look sweet in the  National Museum of African American History and Culture in DC. The first thing that greets you when you enter the Music floor of the museum is Chuck Berry's Cadillac. It'd be great if they had a revolving [no pun intended] display of African American entertainers' rides. Prince's motorcycle one month, Ella's Benz next month..201600914NMAAHCPRESSDAY05A1473894911.jpg

 

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