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BFT 223 - NOW BOARDING!!!


JSngry
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Nice selection, thanks, going to take some thought.

Not expert on the B3 repertoire, good tunes but I'm unlikely to identify them.

Really enjoy #4 and #6 on first listen.

Sonny Blount vaguely comes to mind for #5, but will have to search the collection. Sound quality suggests a bootleg.

Feel like I should know #7, but definitely don't own a recording.

Will go through the program again later this weekend

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1 – Solid organ combo.  Would guess this is older vintage, 50’s or early 60’s.  Jimmy Smith influence.  Good stuff.

2 – Assume this was recorded shortly after the Tokens had their moment with “The Lion Sleeps Tonight”.   Humorous enough, and actually sounds pretty good.

3 – Assume this was recorded shortly after Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd had their moment with ‘Jazz Samba’ .  I actually like it quite a bit.   Organ reminds me of Walter Wanderley, but I don’t remember him ever recording anything this straight ahead.  The drummer had me at “hello”.

4 - Assume this was recorded shortly after the Billy Joe and the Checkmates had their moment with “Percolator Twist”.   Cecil Payne on baritone sax?  It’s actually a pretty interesting cut, though the vinyl fidelity is horridish. 

5 – “Music of Humpback Whales”?  Totally lost on me.

6 – It’s an interesting cut, glad I listened to it, though I don’t expect to revisit it.  Surprisingly NOT lost on me, though in theory I would have expected it to be.

7 – Well all right then.  I was with him for a while, but it got awfully strange toward the end.  But at least Mantan Moreland, John Coltrane, and others get their due.   And “live people and dead people should never mix” is sound advice.  And the music behind the narrative is really good, sounds like a prime ESP-Disk session.

8 – “Two Different Worlds”.  Sounds like Johnny Hartman with strep throat, OD’d on Nyquil.   Good tenor solo.  OK piano solo.  Still pretty lost on me overall

As always, quite a stimulating BFT, thanks.  Much more interesting than 40 minutes of mainstream classics, and as always, it gives me great cover for my December BFT to sound “normal” by comparison, even with my musically offensive choices (“That’s not REALLY jazz,  how dare you!”).

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15 minutes ago, felser said:

 

8 – “Two Different Worlds”.  Sounds like Johnny Hartman with strep throat, OD’d on Nyquil. :rofl:  

 

 

It's Earl Coleman in the same condition. Sonny Rollins on tenor - great solo - Kenny Drew on piano.

Edited by Quasimado
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25 minutes ago, felser said:

1 – Solid organ combo.  Would guess this is older vintage, 50’s or early 60’s.  Jimmy Smith influence.  Good stuff.

At the very end of that date range.

2 – Assume this was recorded shortly after the Tokens had their moment with “The Lion Sleeps Tonight”.   Humorous enough, and actually sounds pretty good.

Sounds very good, actually, imo. The lyrics are truly indicative of the record's purpose. I've been able to semi-glom the location of recording and a few of the possible players. All speculative, but if correct, it explains the quality of the pocket.

3 – Assume this was recorded shortly after Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd had their moment with ‘Jazz Samba’ .  I actually like it quite a bit.   Organ reminds me of Walter Wanderley, but I don’t remember him ever recording anything this straight ahead.  The drummer had me at “hello”.

Plenty of distance between this record and that one, and not Wanderley. Most everybody on this board will know the rhythm section in part or in whole!

4 - Assume this was recorded shortly after the Billy Joe and the Checkmates had their moment with “Percolator Twist”.   Cecil Payne on baritone sax?  It’s actually a pretty interesting cut, though the vinyl fidelity is horridish. 

A lot of assumptions, all totally wrong! :g

5 – “Music of Humpback Whales”?  Totally lost on me.

No whales involved, although as far as humpbacks, I would have no way to know.

6 – It’s an interesting cut, glad I listened to it, though I don’t expect to revisit it.  Surprisingly NOT lost on me, though in theory I would have expected it to be.

Revisiting it is recommended...there's a lot going on in the details, more than an initial listen might reveal. But don't force yourself, obviously. It is from a time when this type of thing was not really happening in this basic type of music, though. In some ways it's predictive of what would soon be happening on a broader scale. I will say that the date of this record is very much in your overall wheelhouse.

7 – Well all right then.  I was with him for a while, but it got awfully strange toward the end.  But at least Mantan Moreland, John Coltrane, and others get their due.   And “live people and dead people should never mix” is sound advice.  And the music behind the narrative is really good, sounds like a prime ESP-Disk session.

It is indeed! And it does indeed. There's kind of a reason for that...

8 – “Two Different Worlds”.  Sounds like Johnny Hartman with strep throat, OD’d on Nyquil.   Good tenor solo.  OK piano solo.  Still pretty lost on me overall

Quasimodo called it. This is one of Sonny's better solos from the era, imo. And probably is overlooked because of Earl Coleman's presence, which is most unfortunate ("jazz purists" of most stripes don't tolerate vocals, much less ENJOY them! LOL!!!!). Personally, I like Earl Coleman most of the time. Like his a LOT. And here too. Also, Sonny seemed to have an affinity with singers when he got the chance. His obbligatos on that Abbey Lincoln record are sublime.

As always, quite a stimulating BFT, thanks.  Much more interesting than 40 minutes of mainstream classics, and as always, it gives me great cover for my December BFT to sound “normal” by comparison, even with my musically offensive choices (“That’s not REALLY jazz,  how dare you!”).

Thanks. It's been years since I've been compelled to do that type of thing (or even personally listen that way). But I certainly enjoy other people doing it!

And I'm always appreciative of an honest, open-minded listen, so thank YOU!

 

 

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1 hour ago, T.D. said:

Nice selection, thanks, going to take some thought.

Not expert on the B3 repertoire, good tunes but I'm unlikely to identify them.

Really enjoy #4 and #6 on first listen.

Sonny Blount vaguely comes to mind for #5, but will have to search the collection. Sound quality suggests a bootleg.

Feel like I should know #7, but definitely don't own a recording.

Will go through the program again later this weekend

No Ra on this record, and not a bootleg.

#7 is a group that you may well have at least one other record by.

Thanks for listening!

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1 hour ago, JSngry said:

No Ra on this record, and not a bootleg.

#7 is a group that you may well have at least one other record by.

Thanks for listening!

New York Art Quartet on #7? I do have a couple of recordings by them...Alan Silva also comes to mind, but less likely IMO.

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Thinking a lot about #6...some hints of "modern classical" in places. Early on it sounds a bit like Terry Riley but less microtonal. Almost like Terry Riley meets somebody like the ICP. Then the electronics totally threw me. Terry Riley meets MEV? Impossible. It does sound rather like MEV (I have the MEV 40 New World box), but that can't be right.

Which is to say I don't have a clue, but it sure is interesting.

Edited by T.D.
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Genre fluid!
1. Bill Doggett and Illinois Jacquet are the names that come to mind
2. The Hi-Los?
3. Dense, possibly not improvised.  Hugh Masekela?
4. House music (maybe trip-hop) meets fifties-ish west coast jazz?  Is it a remix?  Giuffre or Collette?
5. Not a lot of organists come anywhere near this musical region.  Alice Coltrane?
6. Rabih Abou-Khalil is my guess, maybe not, there's some electronics going on here, suggests something later.
7. Leaning toward Archie Shepp for the sax, don't know the poet.
8. Al Hibbler with a younger band?
 

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5 hours ago, randyhersom said:

Genre fluid!
1. Bill Doggett and Illinois Jacquet are the names that come to mind Neither are present on this one.
2. The Hi-Los? No, but...there is a later connection between people in this group and people in that one.
3. Dense, possibly not improvised.  Hugh Masekela? There is improvisation. But Masekela is nowhere in sight.
4. House music (maybe trip-hop) meets fifties-ish west coast jazz?  Sort of, yeah. Is it a remix? Not exactly sure what to call it. Again, sort of, but a bit more than just that.  Giuffre or Collette? Nope!
5. Not a lot of organists come anywhere near this musical region.  Alice Coltrane? Not an organ, and not Alice.
6. Rabih Abou-Khalil is my guess, maybe not, there's some electronics going on here, suggests something later. Not him. Also earlier, actually!
7. Leaning toward Archie Shepp for the sax, don't know the poet. Not Shepp. You probably do know the poet, at least by name. Sleuthed by T.D.
8. Al Hibbler with a younger band? ID-ed by Quasimodo.

Thanks for your response, and please feel free to continue listening and commenting!

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36 minutes ago, felser said:

#2 - The Singers Unlimited ?

No, but closer to the ground on the SU family tree! 

15 minutes ago, T.D. said:

Wild guess, is Charlie Mariano involved with #6?

Saxophone + Eastern sounds + electronics, seems possible.

Not a bad guess, not at all! Just not a correct one. Sorry! 

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28 minutes ago, Quasimado said:

#5 Gagaku - traditional Japanese court music ... who is difficult ...

Probably impossible, in fact. It's a pretty old record... 

And yes, you are, of course, correct.

I know you live in Japan. Is this a type of music that you have occasion to hear performed live? 

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At the local level many Shinto shrines incorporate elements of Gagaku into their traditional ceremonies, festival dances and processions, so I have heard these … accompanied by a little sake :w.

Court Gagaku (similar to your selection (?)) is rather rarified and performed in Shinto ceremonies related to the Imperial Family. There are orchestras in the big cities that occasionally give public performances.

Some of the larger Buddhist temples also have Gagaku groups which accompany Sutra chanting on special occasions.

I’m in the countryside – you’ve wetted my appetite …

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