Clunky

What 78 are you spinning right now ?

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78_dissonance-in-blues_gerald-wilson-and

Gerald Wilson's big band on various labels:

Cruisin' With Cab/Pammy (Black & White, 1946)
The Saint/The Moors (Black & White, 1946)
Smada/The Black Rose (Excelsior, 1947)
Salute to Jimmie Lunceford (My Last Affair)/Dissonance in Blues (United Artist, 1947)
Mambo Mexicano, parts 1 & 2 (Federal, 1954)

The two Black & White records are pretty worn, but the others are in excellent condition. Great musicians on all the discs, but the honors go to Melba Liston's composition "The Moors" - almost on Ellington's level -and the blues "Smada," with a very nice Buddy Collette alto solo. And the bassist on "Smada" is David Bryant, who many years later played with Horace Tapscott's ensembles.

 

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Irving Fazola - New Orleans Jazz (RCA Victor). A four-record album recently found "in the wild." This is a 1946 set of tunes associated with the Original Dixieland Jazz Band, but it's no re-creation. Fazola's wonderful playing is beyond anything the OJDB was capable of. His is my favorite clarinet sound ever - classical, jazz, or other.

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9 hours ago, jeffcrom said:

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Irving Fazola - New Orleans Jazz (RCA Victor). A four-record album recently found "in the wild." This is a 1946 set of tunes associated with the Original Dixieland Jazz Band, but it's no re-creation. Fazola's wonderful playing is beyond anything the OJDB was capable of. His is my favorite clarinet sound ever - classical, jazz, or other.

Faz had such a beautiful sound!  However, I remember chatting with Kenny Davern many years ago.  He raved about Fazola's sound but thought he was a somewhat limited player harmonically.

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Tonight's shellac:

George Gershwin with Paul Whiteman and his Concert Orchestra - Rhapsody in Blue (Victor). Since this piece was premiered 95 years ago today, I pulled out my copy of the second recording, from 1927. I have a later pressing, from the early 1940s.

Lennie Tristano - Wow/Crosscurrent (Capitol)
Lennie Tristano - Sax of a Kind/Marionette (Capitol)
Lennie Tristano - Yestersdays/Intuition (Capitol)

Lee Konitz - Yesterdays/Duet for Saxophone and Guitar (Prestige). It was Chuck Nessa who tipped me off that the 78 issue of "Yesterdays" was different from the LP/CD take, and had never been reissued. But it still took me a couple of years to track down a copy. The 78 take was probably issued in error, since there is no trumpet present, but Miles Davis's name is on the label.

Charlie Parker - Dewey Square/This is Always (Dial)
Charlie Parker - Bongo Bop/Embraceable You (Dial)
Charlie Parker - Bird of Paradise/Dexterity (Dial). I stopped in at a suburban Atlanta record store today and picked up a couple of LPs. In addition, they had exactly three 78s - but they were three E- to E Charlie Parker Dials. They sound really good. Takes one and two of "Embraceable You" were both issued on Dial 1024, and I crossed my fingers before playing that disc, hoping that it had take one. It does, and I'm delighted to have one of my favorite recordings of all time in its original format.

And when I spun the last Bird record, I experienced a feeling I've had in the past when I hear a longtime favorite recording on 78 for the first time. Hearing these two tunes as the two sides of a record - not as part of a 20-minute sequence of tracks on an LP side, or part of an hour-long program on a CD - is a very different listening experience. As many times as I've heard "Dexterity" since I was 16 or 17, today it jumped out at me as a masterpiece, and reminded me what a great band the 1947 Charlie Parker Quintet was: every element was in balance, and everyone knew his role and executed it perfectly.

Edited by jeffcrom

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14 hours ago, jazztrain said:

Faz had such a beautiful sound!  However, I remember chatting with Kenny Davern many years ago.  He raved about Fazola's sound but thought he was a somewhat limited player harmonically.

I listened to the Victor album again tonight with Davern's assessment in mind, and I'm just not hearing what he's talking about. Davern is a generation younger than Fazola, so that may influence his opinion. I certainly don't hear the kind of harmonic sophistication Coleman Hawkins or Roy Eldridge had, but I also don't hear any harmonic waywardness or hesitation. Fazola obviously understands chord structures, and even introduces a few (not many) chord extensions/alterations. He is, at least on these eight sides, about as sophisticated harmonically (or a little more so) as you would expect from a New Orleans musician born in 1912.

To clarify, I didn't post this to be argumentative, but to satisfy my curiosity about Davern's opinion.

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9 hours ago, jeffcrom said:

I listened to the Victor album again tonight with Davern's assessment in mind, and I'm just not hearing what he's talking about. Davern is a generation younger than Fazola, so that may influence his opinion. I certainly don't hear the kind of harmonic sophistication Coleman Hawkins or Roy Eldridge had, but I also don't hear any harmonic waywardness or hesitation. Fazola obviously understands chord structures, and even introduces a few (not many) chord extensions/alterations. He is, at least on these eight sides, about as sophisticated harmonically (or a little more so) as you would expect from a New Orleans musician born in 1912.

To clarify, I didn't post this to be argumentative, but to satisfy my curiosity about Davern's opinion.

I wish I could remember if he provided a specific example. I just remember his general comment about Fazola and thought I'd pass it along.

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Swedish jazz on American labels, then a bunch of 1950s gospel:

The Swinging Swedes/Estrad Poll Winners - Summertime/Pick Yourself Up (Blue Note)
Rolf Ericson's Swingin' Swedes - Miles Away/Perdido (Discovery). Ericson, Arne Domnerus, Lars Gullin, and bassist Simon Brehm are on both of these records.

The Kelly Brothers - Prayer for Tomorrow/God Said He was Coming (Vee-Jay). What a great record.
Roberta Martin Singers - Grace/Ride on King Jesus (Savoy). This is one of my latest-issued 78s, from 1958.
Rev. Kelsey and Congregation - Little Boy/Lord Send the Rain (MGM). The only record earlier than 1950 I played - it's from 1948.
Reverend Cleophus Robinson - Moaning in the Morning/I Can See So Much (Peacock)
The Original Gospel Harmonettes - I'm Sealed/Just to Behold His Face (Specialty)
The Original Gospel Harmonettes - That's Enough/Am I a Soldier (Specialty)

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Swing and such tonight:

Bunny Berigan - I Can't Get Started / Rhythm Saved the World (Okeh). A first draft for his magnificent later 12" Victor recording of "Started."

Sidney Bechet - Blues of Bechet / The Sheik of Araby (Victor). The first overdubbed solo jazz record.

Sidney Bechet/Mezz Mezzow - Really the Blues, parts 1 & 2 (King Jazz)
Sidney Bechet/Mezz Mezzow - Bowin' the Blues / Old School (King Jazz)

Billie Holiday - Night and Day / Gloomy Sunday (Columbia)

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Posted (edited)

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Mardi Gras evening playlist.

Edited by jeffcrom

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Posted (edited)

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I seem to switch my turntable from LP to 78 or vice versa about every four to five days. Back to 78s tonight, with some prime Louis - three original issues and a master-pressed reissue:

Heebie Jeebies / Muskrat Ramble (Okeh)
Weather Bird / Dear Old Southland (Hot Record Society)
Basin Street Blues / No (Okeh)
Squeeze Me / Two Deuces (Okeh)

The last two records are among the gems of my 78 collection. The last one has a few minor flaws, but my copy of "Basin Street"/"No" is as close to mint as any original copy out there, I suspect. I suspect it was unplayed before I bought it at a suburban Atlanta record and antique shop.

 

Edited by jeffcrom

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Posted (edited)

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Sunday morning Bach:

English Suite in A Minor - Wanda Landowska, harpsichord (two 12" British HMV records)
Flute Sonata No. 2 In E flat - George Barrere with Yella Pessl, harpsichord (12" British HMV)
Suite No. 1 in G - The Danish Quartet (flute, violin, cello, piano) (12" British HMV)
Cello Suite No. 3 in C: Prelude/Sarabande - Pablo Casals (12" US Columbia)

The 1915 Casals represents the first recording of any part of the Cello Suites, which weren't recorded in their entirety until the 1930s. It's one of those records that makes me love 78s - it seems miraculous that I can hold this disc in my hand and play it on my turntable.

Edited by jeffcrom

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