Hardbopjazz

Overlooked pianists

300 posts in this topic

On 19/07/2015 at 6:48 PM, paul secor said:

Lorraine Geller's Dot album is well worth listening to.

I have that one and like it a lot. Plus also Jutta Hipp, who was also mentioned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yet another '70s Mingus Band alumnus is Danny Mixon.  He was playing piano with MIngus in the most of 1976.  Mixon is not really overlooked, had a colorful career and still going strong, but it was unfortunate that his work at Mingus Band is not on any legitimate releases.  Mingus Band including Mixon visited Japan in July 1976 and left several (bootleg) live recordings.  Mixon shines on them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, mhatta said:

Yet another '70s Mingus Band alumnus is Danny Mixon.  He was playing piano with MIngus in the most of 1976.  Mixon is not really overlooked, had a colorful career and still going strong, but it was unfortunate that his work at Mingus Band is not on any legitimate releases.  Mingus Band including Mixon visited Japan in July 1976 and left several (bootleg) live recordings.  Mixon shines on them.

Danny Mixon is on a legitimate Mingus release--on Music for Todo Modo, which is one side of the LP, Cumbia and Jazz Fusion.

Edited by kh1958

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, kh1958 said:

Danny Mixon is on a legitimate Mingus release--on Music for Todo Modo, which is one side of the LP, Cumbia and Jazz Fusion.

Oh, I assumed it was Bob Neloms.  Thanks for correction!

Edited by mhatta

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking of which, Bob Neloms is yet another Mingus alum and forgotten, overlooked great.  Personally I think he was the best of the bunch, could play anything authentically, like Jaki Byard.  Seems he recorded one leader session, a solo piano recording ("Pretty Music" for India Navigation, 1982), but unfortunately I couldn't find it yet.

On this Dannie Richmond album, Neloms shows what he got, including an impression of Erroll Garner...

 

Edited by mhatta

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, mhatta said:

Speaking of which, Bob Neloms is yet another Mingus alum and forgotten, overlooked great.  Personally I think he was the best of the bunch, could play anything authentically, like Jaki Byard.  Seems he recorded one leader session, a solo piano recording ("Pretty Music" for India Navigation, 1982), but unfortunately I couldn't find it yet.

On this Dannie Richmond album, Neloms shows what he got, including an impression of Erroll Garner...

 

Agreement on unheralded Bob Neloms - (IMO) his talents are even better served on Dannie Richmond + The Last Mingus Band "Plays Charles Mingus" ( Timeless) from 1981 ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Charles Bell is also an obscure but interesting figure.  He sounds like an amalgam of John Lewis and Ahmad Jamal for me.  Introverted and still funky.  He made a few recordings in the early 60's, then left an active playing career to become a music educator. Drummer Poogie Bell is his son.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Charles Bell's "Another Dimension" on Atlantic was among the first LPs I ever owned. I was 14, living in M'Babane, Swaziland where my father was the nation's first US Peace Corps Director. The volunteers there received a "care package" of LPs from Atlantic Records, all mono releases, and one of them gave me the LPs he didn't want, which included two jazz items, this and Leo Wright's "Blues Shout," as he knew I was beginning to be interested in jazz.

I love and cherish those two albums. I have purchased the other Bell that I could find. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John Coates, Jr. is also an unsung hero in Jazz.  He was an early influence on Keith Jarrett, but never really achieved the same fame and fortune Jarrett could enjoy.  Still, he is one of the most unique voices in Jazz piano.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are many good Japanese Jazz pianists who are not well known outside Japan.  Tsuyoshi Yamamoto is one of them.  Not so adventurous perhaps, but always swinging hard.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/12/2017 at 2:16 AM, jazzbo said:

Charles Bell's "Another Dimension" on Atlantic was among the first LPs I ever owned. I was 14, living in M'Babane, Swaziland where my father was the nation's first US Peace Corps Director. The volunteers there received a "care package" of LPs from Atlantic Records, all mono releases, and one of them gave me the LPs he didn't want, which included two jazz items, this and Leo Wright's "Blues Shout," as he knew I was beginning to be interested in jazz.

I love and cherish those two albums. I have purchased the other Bell that I could find. 

Just played the Bell.

I'll see if I can find the Wright in my "archives".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking of Japanese pianists, I've really enjoyed what I've heard from Masahiko Sato.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking further of Japanese pianists,  I have enjoyed several duo recordings of Aki Takase:

- Blue Monk (w/David Murray)

- Duet for Eric Dolphy and The Dessert (w/Rudi Mahall)

 

Is the late Connie Crothers overlooked?  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Takase and Sato are awesome -- and in the spirit of the thread, I guess I don't find them all that overlooked (same for Masabumi Kikuchi, though he's a bigger name).

I'll also throw out Yosuke Yamashita, Takashi Kako, Hideo Ichikawa, and Shoji Aketagawa. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, clifford_thornton said:

Takase and Sato are awesome -- and in the spirit of the thread, I guess I don't find them all that overlooked (same for Masabumi Kikuchi, though he's a bigger name).

I'll also throw out Yosuke Yamashita, Takashi Kako, Hideo Ichikawa, and Shoji Aketagawa. 

Takashi Kako + Kent Carter + Oliver Johnson "TOK Paradox" on JAPO is a good one ....

Edited by soulpope

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/14/2017 at 11:27 AM, BeBop said:

Is the late Connie Crothers overlooked? 

Hmmm....does going from "need to check her out one day" to "ok, let's do this more or less all at once" to "ok, that's enough of that" count as overlooked?

If so, then yes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shirley Scott is primarily known as an organist, but she was also a pretty good pianist.  Two piano trio albums she made in her later years ("Blues Everywhere" and "Skylark" for Candid label) are little-known gems.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, jlhoots said:

We're probably overlooking Elmo Hope these days!!

Or his wife Bertha Hope ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll certainly give many :tup:tup:tup to Mr. Cochrane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.