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Joe

BFT 198 Link & Discussion

19 posts in this topic

Greetings all.

BFT 198 (September 2020) is now available for your listening / sleuthing pleasure. 15 tracks.

Thanks to Thom Keith, you can listen online at http://thomkeith.net/index.php/blindfold-tests/.

Looking forward to the discussion to follow!

Best,

JM

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Very piano-centric but not very engaging for my tastes as the former GHF. :ph34r:

#1 is Summertime and kept me listening longer than I anticipated. Curious about this one, and also 13 which is an interesting take on a standard whose name escapes me and when someone else ID's I'll be pissed.

Listening to 15 as I post, interesting as solo organ I can only guess someone newer playing in an older style.

Thanks Joe, I'm sure others will engage on a deeper level than I did/could.

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Buzzed through, will be awhile before I can listen to the whole thing.  Every cut sounds like a winner, more engaging to for my tastes than Dan's.  He is a great guy, and we get common enjoyment over how different our tastes are!  Thanks Joe, look forward to discovering this one in depth.

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Thanks ya'll!

#13: IDing the horn players might help with the IDing the tune.

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Listening to this one before the month gets away.

01 - Summertime.  Not sure about the snake-charmer intro.   At first, the bass had me thinking Francois Rabbath.  It’s not him, but my guess is that this has European origins.  Not sure I’m fully buying the gratuitious use of the Byzantine scale, but I like it in spite of that.  Definitely digging the bass.  I appreciate the attempt at a different approach, but I’m not sure I can handle it more than once.

02 - Now, I like this.  It’s got that restrained solo piano feel, but with some nice extensions in there.  Sort of like Roland Hanna meets Ran Blake.  I’m going to switch gears about 4 minutes in.  Sounds like a Monk tune, but maybe a Fred Hersch interpretation.

03 - At first, I was thinking someone else was sneaking in some Dennis Gonzalez.  It has that modern Steeplechase feel, like something John Swana would do.  These guys are more modern than that, at least the saxophonist is.  Has that heavy rhythmic variance of a lot of modern Jazz.   I like it, but I’m not in love with it.

04 - Meandering melodic lines, questionable direction.  I should detest this, but I quite like it.  Seems like it owes a bit of a nod to Abdullah Ibrahim.  I don’t believe it’s him, but neither would I be surprised if it were.  Has touches that suggest Mal Waldron, as well.  I believe I would enjoy sitting and talking music with this pianist.  Runs a bit long, but I like it overall.

05 - This is weird.  First thought was this cat like Cannonball, a lot.  Then I was getting a distinct Sonny Criss vibe, though the rhythm section has a Bitches Brew meets Shepp’s Mariamar vibe.  I want to make a weird guess of Anthony Ortega, but it seems too aggressive.  I like this, though.  This hits the wheelhouse really well.  It’s raw.  I’m in.  Let me add, it’s raw, but hasn’t lost the blues.  This just works.  This one seems to run a shade long, as well, but I’m still in.  

06 - Shades of Tristano.  At times, shakes hands with Mal.  I could listen to a lot of this.  Live, but not sure who it is.  GIMME MORE!!!

07 - It’s an interesting feel, but I’m not convinced it goes anywhere.  It’s great in the background, but not a sit-and-listen track.  I can always do without electronics, but I have to confess, I’m a fan of drummers replicating that remix sound.  My guess is, this is the drummer’s gig, and that’s what we’re supposed to focus on (because it’s where the action is).  Nice bass line, but again, doesn’t really go anywhere.  Reminds me of Radio Citizen.

08 - Guessing a younger pianist.  Has that technique.  First note sounded like Don Pullen.  The main line sounded like Mal Waldron, but too precise.  Then, it turns out, we’re at Solar.  No idea.  Sticking with younger pianist.  Wait, is this perhaps TWO pianists?  I’m still thiinking younger, but they’ve done their listening.  Even a direct Tristano quote at about 5:00.  Still unsure if it’s one or two.

09 - Ah, the somewhat rare trumpet/unemployment stick unison lead.  Post-Shorter doubler on soprano, could be about anybody.  Now, that alto provide a hint.  Is this The Travelers, perhaps?  Certainly sounds like it.  Let’s make a triple line.  Getting a Dizzy feel from the horn, but 90% sure it’s not him.  Could be Jon Faddis (it sounds THAT close to me).  Really almost don’t hear the alto on the head.  

10 - Not sure where I am on this one.  It’s pleasant, but I’m working, listening on the laptop, and it really hasn’t made much of an impression on me.  A co-worker of my Dad’s had alternate lyrics to this song, and it’s kind of ruined the song for me.  I will not share them here — no need to ruin it for others.

11 - A little second-line, I’m in.  Especially when you put it with a bitchin’ bass line.  Not sold on the horn, entirely, but the feel of the tune is awsome.  Sounds like a Larry Willis groove.  Very busy saxophone — why not?  Plenty of energy here.  I’m loving the rhythm section more than the horn, though.  I’m going to throw out a weird guess of Ernie Watts on alto.

12 - Man, somebody always throws in an old needle-drop and it’s obvious, but I’m always afraid to risk it.  To hell with it — is it Fats Waller?

13 - Know the song, can’t give you the title.  First impression was Art Farmer.  Oh, shit.  Cherokee, for crissake.  Hmmm… sure sounds like Lee Konitz.  Seems to me I had this at one point (Live in Genoa?), but I don’t recall this being so long.  

14 - This one is going to irritate me.  I know that pianist.  Two listens and I don’t have it.  I’m going to hate myself, later.

15 - This one is weird.  Pace and general feel is Donna Lee, but I don’t hear it, yet.  Are we dealing with solo organ?  That’s an oddity, but I’m not sold on it.  Only guy I can think of trying something like this is Joey D., but this person sounds a bit older.  Wait… now we’re at the ballpark.  I’m so lost.  I give it points for being original, but I’m not feeling this one.

And, for some reason, my wife is downstairs rocking out to Mingus Ah Um.  Guess I did something right last night!  :D

Nearly all of this is new to my ears.  I’ll be interested to see the reveal.

 

 

 

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Thanks Thom!

A couple of your guesses are spot-on.

I will confess that there are some artists here whose jazz "credentials" might be considered questionable.

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21 hours ago, Joe said:

Thanks Thom!

A couple of your guesses are spot-on.

I will confess that there are some artists here whose jazz "credentials" might be considered questionable.

I was wondering if the Tristano connection was intentional.

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       1) “Summertime.”  The performance feels pretty laid back, maybe too much so to justify the length of  10 + minutes.  The opening made me think of Yusef Lateef on oboe, but not really his sound.  For that matter, it may not be oboe.  

2)   I’m almost never good at identifying solo piano. 

Undoubtedly Konitz on #13. 

              I browsed a bit and looked at Thom's comments.  I have to say this is unfamiliar stuff, and I expect to bomb on this one.

 

Edited by Milestones

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1 – Nice moody performance of “Summertime” by Ahmad Abdul-Malik and Co. from the 1963 “Eastern Moods” album.

 

2 – Nice enough, but did not keep my attention.

 

3 – Yes, I like this.  Great tone for the tenor player, who is likely well-known.  I’m not placing this, think I probably should be.

 

4 – Beautiful.  Two solo piano pieces in first four selections?  I much prefer this one to #2, and want to own it if I don’t already.    Sort of a cross between the ECM Corea and Jarrett solo piano styles.

 

5 -  I like this a lot more than I would have expected and look forward to the reveal.   The sax player is inventive, the bass player carries the weight, and the rhythms are nicely slinky.   At 15 minutes, it does oustay it’s welcome some.

 

6 - .  Three solo piano pieces in first four selections?  I like this more than the first, less than the second, I do like it, and do admit all three are different from each other.  This has a very African/Dollar Brand feel to it.

 

7 – Sorry, absolutely does not translate for me.

 

8 – I like this one OK, but not as much as #6, and not nearly as much as #4.   Good inner logic to the playing, and nice technique.   I’m enjoying the survey of solo piano styles on the even-numbered selections.

 

9. – I’m sure I own this somewhere.  Bright and festive tune/arrangement.  Solos don’t do as much for me as the ensemble playing, though the trumpeter does get frisky in the second half of his solo, and the pianist acquits himself very well.  Reminds me of the Visitors (Grubbs brothers, Coltrane’s nephews), but it’s not them.  Part of that is because of the saxes, part because of the pianist sounding so like Sid Simmons.

 

10 – You did a really nice job picking the solo piano pieces.  This one is also good, though #4 remains my choice.  

 

11 – Right in my wheelhouse as far as styles.  Sounds like a vinyl transfer?  Worth the effort.  I would guess the 70’s, and I’m coming up blank on who it is, but definitely want to know more!  Count me in if this is easily obtainable on CD.  Really don’t think I’m familiar with it, though I’ve been wrong many times before.

 

12 – Old.  Doesn’t do much for me, but surely very good for what it is.

 

13 – I’m sure it’s good, but leaves me fairly cold.  Sort of the inverse of #5, I like it less than I probably would on paper.  The alto player sounds to be very old (age, not style).

 

14 – Moody, pretty, and all that.  I’d probably like this better late at night than I do in the middle of a holiday afternoon.

 

15 – Jimmy Smith or someone who spent a whole lot of time listening to him.  Certainly enjoyable!

 

And “certainly enjoyable” is a good description of this BFT.  Fits the perfect hope for one of these, to discover cuts I love but don’t recognize.  Breathlessly await ID/reveal of #4 and #11, also looking forward to learning more about #5, #6, #9 and others.  Well done, thanks so much!

 

On 9/3/2020 at 4:25 PM, tkeith said:

11 - A little second-line, I’m in.  Especially when you put it with a bitchin’ bass line.  Not sold on the horn, entirely, but the feel of the tune is awsome.  Sounds like a Larry Willis groove.  Very busy saxophone — why not?  Plenty of energy here.  I’m loving the rhythm section more than the horn, though.  I’m going to throw out a weird guess of Ernie Watts on alto.

 

Yeah, I was going to comment on the busyness of the horn.  Works big time for me on this cut, but I would not hold the solo up as a masterpiece.   But the cut evokes an era and a feeling that I dig so much.

On 9/3/2020 at 4:25 PM, tkeith said:

And, for some reason, my wife is downstairs rocking out to Mingus Ah Um. 

You are blessed above all men!  My wife does some good stuff on her own listening time also, such as Oliver Nelson's "Stolen Moments".

Edited by felser

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1 hour ago, felser said:

1 – Nice moody performance of “Summertime” by Ahmad Abdul-Malik and Co. from the 1963 “Eastern Moods” album.

 

2 – Nice enough, but did not keep my attention.

 

3 – Yes, I like this.  Great tone for the tenor player, who is likely well-known.  I’m not placing this, think I probably should be.

 

4 – Beautiful.  Two solo piano pieces in first four selections?  I much prefer this one to #2, and want to own it if I don’t already.    Sort of a cross between the ECM Corea and Jarrett solo piano styles.

 

5 -  I like this a lot more than I would have expected and look forward to the reveal.   The sax player is inventive, the bass player carries the weight, and the rhythms are nicely slinky.   At 15 minutes, it does oustay it’s welcome some.

 

6 - .  Three solo piano pieces in first four selections?  I like this more than the first, less than the second, I do like it, and do admit all three are different from each other.  This has a very African/Dollar Brand feel to it.

 

7 – Sorry, absolutely does not translate for me.

 

8 – I like this one OK, but not as much as #6, and not nearly as much as #4.   Good inner logic to the playing, and nice technique.   I’m enjoying the survey of solo piano styles on the even-numbered selections.

 

9. – I’m sure I own this somewhere.  Bright and festive tune/arrangement.  Solos don’t do as much for me as the ensemble playing, though the trumpeter does get frisky in the second half of his solo, and the pianist acquits himself very well.  Reminds me of the Visitors (Grubbs brothers, Coltrane’s nephews), but it’s not them.  Part of that is because of the saxes, part because of the pianist sounding so like Sid Simmons.

 

10 – You did a really nice job picking the solo piano pieces.  This one is also good, though #4 remains my choice.  

 

11 – Right in my wheelhouse as far as styles.  Sounds like a vinyl transfer?  Worth the effort.  I would guess the 70’s, and I’m coming up blank on who it is, but definitely want to know more!  Count me in if this is easily obtainable on CD.  Really don’t think I’m familiar with it, though I’ve been wrong many times before.

 

12 – Old.  Doesn’t do much for me, but surely very good for what it is.

 

13 – I’m sure it’s good, but leaves me fairly cold.  Sort of the inverse of #5, I like it less than I probably would on paper.  The alto player sounds to be very old (age, not style).

 

14 – Moody, pretty, and all that.  I’d probably like this better late at night than I do in the middle of a holiday afternoon.

 

15 – Jimmy Smith or someone who spent a whole lot of time listening to him.  Certainly enjoyable!

 

And “certainly enjoyable” is a good description of this BFT.  Fits the perfect hope for one of these, to discover cuts I love but don’t recognize.  Breathlessly await ID/reveal of #4 and #11, also looking forward to learning more about #5, #6, #9 and others.  Well done, thanks so much!

 

Yeah, I was going to comment on the busyness of the horn.  Works big time for me on this cut, but I would not hold the solo up as a masterpiece.   But the cut evokes an era and a feeling that I dig so much.

You are blessed above all men!  My wife does some good stuff on her own listening time also, such as Oliver Nelson's "Stolen Moments".

Thank you for these comments!

#4 I chose precisely because I have played this performance for friends before and they have also heard Corea and Jarrett in it. But it's not Chick or Keith.

I don't believe 11 has ever made it to CD, FWIW. But maybe in Japan?

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31 minutes ago, Joe said:

#4 I chose precisely because I have played this performance for friends before and they have also heard Corea and Jarrett in it. But it's not Chick or Keith.

Yes, didn't think it was either of them, but influenced by both.  And I doubt if it is an ECM recording, because I don't know who else on the label would have recorded something like this.  Look forward to finding out more!

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Joe. You have put together a very interesting Blindfold Test of all music which is unfamiliar to me. I need to listen some more before commenting. 

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Thanks! Looking forward to reading your thoughts/impressions!

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Ok, is that first one a rendition of Summertime? The tenor at least plays some bars from it whenever they're on. Excellent tune. Is that also the stritch or is it something else? Love it. 

Also, love all the solo piano tracks on the even numbers. The first one is especially a beautifully played song. Track 8's solo is really bluesy...and is number 12 Duke? Really great, all of them. 

On Track 7, love the sampler or whatever it is that carves in and out. The bass player is great too. 

Number 9 is a standard right? Very upbeat and cheerful. 

11 = brilliant

Track 13 is trumpet butter. 

And number 15 is a B3 solo but good god they can play the bass line on that thing. I love those pulsing bass notes that good organ players produce. Jamming! 

Looking forward to the reveal as I have no idea who any of these artists are, as well as the fact that to me there were no bad or uninteresting songs played.

Edited by Dub Modal

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On 9/3/2020 at 4:25 PM, tkeith said:

09 - Ah, the somewhat rare trumpet/unemployment stick unison lead.  Post-Shorter doubler on soprano, could be about anybody.  Now, that alto provide a hint.  Is this The Travelers, perhaps?  Certainly sounds like it.  Let’s make a triple line.  Getting a Dizzy feel from the horn, but 90% sure it’s not him.  Could be Jon Faddis (it sounds THAT close to me).  Really almost don’t hear the alto on the head.  

 

Jesus.  What was in the pipe when I wrote this.  Wasn't until I read Felser's comments that I realized I'd called The Visitors "The Travelers".   #justsayno

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18 hours ago, Dub Modal said:

Ok, is that first one a rendition of Summertime? The tenor at least plays some bars from it whenever they're on. Excellent tune. Is that also the stritch or is it something else? Love it. 

Also, love all the solo piano tracks on the even numbers. The first one is especially a beautifully played song. Track 8's solo is really bluesy...and is number 12 Duke? Really great, all of them. 

On Track 7, love the sampler or whatever it is that carves in and out. The bass player is great too. 

Number 9 is a standard right? Very upbeat and cheerful. 

11 = brilliant

Track 13 is trumpet butter. 

And number 15 is a B3 solo but good god they can play the bass line on that thing. I love those pulsing bass notes that good organ players produce. Jamming! 

Looking forward to the reveal as I have no idea who any of these artists are, as well as the fact that to me there were no bad or uninteresting songs played.

Thanks!

Pretty sure everyone has IDed the tune on #1.

#7 is going to be a big stretch for some listeners. Glad you dug it!

#9 might be based on a standard. But, to the bet of my knowledge, it is an original/contrafact.

#12, not Duke, but there's a conceptual connection (?).

#13: I think some folks have IDed the other horn, but no one has drawn a bull's eye on the trumpet player. Let's just say those two soloists have a history together.

36 minutes ago, tkeith said:

Jesus.  What was in the pipe when I wrote this.  Wasn't until I read Felser's comments that I realized I'd called The Visitors "The Travelers".   #justsayno

Ha! Not the Grubbs Bros., but those Visitors records are great sources for BFT tracks. Ditto the Catalyst stuff, to keep things Philly-centric for a moment.

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I've thought of doing an entirely 1970s Philly-Centric BFT to honor the stuff I came of age on.  Catalyst, The Visitors, Khan Jamal, Byard Lancaster, Rufus Harley, Monette Sudler etc.

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1 hour ago, felser said:

I've thought of doing an entirely 1970s Philly-Centric BFT to honor the stuff I came of age on.  Catalyst, The Visitors, Khan Jamal, Byard Lancaster, Rufus Harley, Monette Sudler etc.

All great music!

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