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Woody Allen


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Woody Allen makes careful selections of the music that plays on his films sountracks. And he likes a wide variety of jazz!

Another great soundtrack was the one for 'Husbands and Wives'. Not my preferred Allen film but while watching it you could listen to Leo Reisman's 'What Is This Thing Called Love?' (with the trumpet of Bubbey Miley well featured), Wes Montgomery's 'West Coast Blues' and 'That Old Feeling' by Stan Getz and Gerry Mulligan, and more...

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My two (underated) favorites:

Radio Days - Woody Allen's memories of his childhood and how they tied into the radio shows that his family listened to. Very funny, very clever. Seth Green plays the young Woody Allen character, "Joe". Josh Mostel is great.

"Allen cuts between Joe's working class Brooklyn neighborhood and the glittery and glamorous world of radio in Manhattan. Joe's favorite radio hero is The Masked Avenger, and he dreams of getting The Masked Avenger Secret Decoder Ring. Using all the money they have collected for Israel, Joe and his friends buy the ring, much to the shock of his mother (Julie Kavner) and the local rabbi. His father (Michael Tucker), a business failure, is an ineffective and distant man. His uncle Abe (Josh Mostel) is obsessed with eating. His Aunt Bea (Dianne Wiest) is obsessed with getting married. All together, these relatives make up a rather chaotic life in Brooklyn for Joe. Interspersed with these family relations are vignettes of radio lore —from the cigarette girl (Mia Farrow) who wants to strike it big in radio, to the "Name That Tune" jackpot telephone call answered by a burglar, who guesses the right answer and wins the victimized homeowners a cornucopia of valuable prizes." - Allmovie.com

Zelig - a mockumentary about a human chameleon, with old black & white newsreel footage. More clever than funny - it trumps Forest Gump by 20 years or so.

"An appropriately pompous narrator details the life and times of Leonard Zelig, whose overwhelming desire for conformity is manifested in his ability to take on the facial and vocal characteristics of whomever he happens to be around at the moment. He shows up at batting practice with Babe Ruth, among William Randolph Hearst's guests as San Simeon, side by side with Pope Pius at the Vatican, and peering anxiously over the shoulder of Adolf Hitler at the Nuremberg Rally. Becoming a celebrity in his own right, Zelig inspires a song, a dance craze, and a Warner Bros. biopic..." - Allmovie.com

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I've been a Woody Allen fan for a long time; however, I must admit I ten to like his earlier films more than his later ones. Still, hardly any of his films are without reward.

Favorites:

Bananas- flat out funny

Play It Again, Sam (there's a great scene where Woody is putting a jazz LP on the turntable and completely destroys it from nervousness). Funny and sophisticated.

Annie Hall - funny and romantic.

Manhattan- I think this is his masterpiece

Hannah and Her Sisters - underrated and underdiscussed I think. Check this one out. Excellent.

Manhattan Murder Mystery - this draws on many Hitchcock motifs and techniques. Maybe Woody's tribute to Hitch.

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I've been a Woody Allen fan for a long time; however, I must admit I tend to like his earlier films more than his later ones. Still, hardly any of his films are without reward.

Favorites:

Bananas- flat out funny

And :tup:tup:tup to Take the Money and Run:

"I have a gub" :lol::lol::lol:

Playing cello in the marching band! :lol::lol::lol:

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I've been a Woody Allen fan for a long time; however, I must admit I tend to like his earlier films more than his later ones.  Still, hardly any of his films are without reward. 

Favorites:

Bananas- flat out funny

And :tup:tup:tup to Take the Money and Run:

"I have a gub" :lol::lol::lol:

Playing cello in the marching band! :lol::lol::lol:

Or the interviews with the parents who are so ashamed, they're wearing Groucho glasses. :D

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Sleeper. One of my favorites- I've almost seen it too many times. "Take the money and run" was an early, lower budget film, but one of his funniest of all time. I always liked "Love and death", too. "Radio Days' is another personal fave. "What's Up Tiger Lily" is fun also.

I need to catch up with more of the later films.

Before I saw many of his films, I was in love with his books "Without Feathers" and "Getting Even". I especially enjoyed the play "Death knocks", and the "Gossage-Vardebedian Papers" (chess match by mail).

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Glad to see 'Manhattan' listed several times. This is still my favorite Woody Allen film.

Every time I see it, I fall in love with Mariel Hemingway all over again :wub:

Too bad she never managed to make another appearance as attaching as this one.

Woody Allen was filming scenes from 'Everyone Says I Love You' right around my corner several years ago. Watched the shooting one full evening! Enjoyable film too but not among his best.

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