Mark Stryker

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Everything posted by Mark Stryker

  1. Thanks for your enthusiasm! Hey, thanks. Much appreciated. Thanks, Peter. Hope it brings back some memories for you. Glad you're enjoying it ...
  2. Advertisements for Myself Lots of news today about Jazz from Detroit. First, the publication date is officially July 8 and it's now up for pre-order. And have we got a deal for you -- a 40% discount off of list price if you order at the University of Michigan Press website. That takes the price from $39.95 to $23.97. Just type in the promo code UMSTRYKER on the checkout page. Here's the listing page. https://www.press.umich.edu/4454129/jazz_from_detroit Second, as part of announcing the book, WBGO has an exclusive excerpt up at their website -- the chapter about Regina Carter. https://www.wbgo.org/ Third, the book has a website at https://jazzfromdetroit.com/ Please visit and have a look around. There's background on the book, including the Table of Contents; a bio of your author and friendly proprietor; press photos (and other cool photos to see); links where you can pre-order (plus the promo code for the 40% discount); and a section called "Musings" -- basically a blog, whose inaugural post celebrates Joe Henderson's birthday today with a brief taste of my chapter about Joe and some representative music. (The "Music" section itself on the site will be populated with Playlists and the like in the coming weeks and months.). There's also some generous advance endorsements from Pat Metheny, Sonny Rollins, and others. Onward.
  3. Public Service Announcement For reasons too convoluted to summarize easily, Amazon is currently showing "Jazz from Detroit' out of stock and with a one-month wait for orders. Some of you who ordered through them previously might have gotten a notification saying the book was on back order. Ignore all of this. They've got lots of books on the way to them, and we've requested that they change the page to reflect this ASAP, but we can't do it ourselves or make them move any swifter than they want to. Leaving all of this aside, if you have not gotten the book yet and would like to, I suggest (a) patronizing your favorite bricks-and-mortar bookstore and if they don't have it in stock, ask them to order it for you -- they'll get it within days. (b) order via the University of Michign Press website. Use the discount code UMSTRYKER on the check-out page to get 30% off the list price. https://www.press.umich.edu/4454129/jazz_from_detroit
  4. Yes. Jack had moved to Windsor, Canada -- just across the river from Detroit -- and the Australian Jazz Quartet/Quintet was formed there. When the group broke up, he settled in Detroit in the late '50s, where, among other things, he was a staff musicians for years at ABC, including being part of the band for Soupy Sales' late-night show, "Soupy's On," which featured a LOT of visiting jazz stars. Jack also owned a jazz club/restaurant here in the '60s and did a TON of studio and commercial works like writing/arranging for auto shows and industry films for the car companies. He retired to Florida in the late '90s or so. Coda: I sent another note to my publisher askng about overseas shipping rates.
  5. Who is with Sonny Rollins?

    I don't know who it is, but I think it's a rock or popular music guy.
  6. Good question. I did tap into some of Dan's writing and it helped here and there confirm some stuff or keep a timelines straight, but mostly it documents players and scenes who were not central to the book. His name does come up in the book as an early teacher of Robert Hurst. The photos that I was able to find again were not directly relevant to my project, but I also was not able to access the bulk of the photos in the time frame of the book -- long story. Thanks for ordering! I
  7. Buddy Rich Big Band

    This is exactly right. That's the biggest problem with the post-1969 bands. Too many college kids. Plus, the electric bass exacerbates the issue. Not because it's not "pure jazz" or "authentic" but because the attack, timbre and texture of the electric instrument doesn't have the weight, warmth or pop ("hump") an acoustic bass when walking quarter notes. So the beat sounds thin. Not helpful when the band is already sounding thin and too on-top to swing.
  8. Yes! Early in the day on Friday, August 2. Noon I believe ...Come say hi. Really appreciate your enthusiasm and, of course, the sales. Thanks
  9. Gang: Today at John F. King Books in Detroit -- a truly amazing used book store that's GINORMOUS (four flours, quite possibly 1 million books) -- I saw what appeared to be a complete set of bound issues of Storyville Magazine. Vols. 1-162 in about about 16 separate bound collections as you would find in libraries. Mint condition. They were not cheap. I think $35 for each set, but the store might work with anyone interested in all of them. These are not for me, but I thought somebody who frequents our little colony here might be interested. Here's a link to the store: https://www.rarebooklink.com/
  10. Storyville Magazine (bound)

    Absolutely. Good sleuthing.
  11. Amazing Miles Davis interview with Don Demichael in Rolling Stone, 1969. Revealing scene setting, candid, and extended riffs on race, rock, and a bunch of other things. Also, a lot of stuff about, um ... (checks notes) ... Buddy Rich. Spoiler: Miles digs him. Excerpts: -- Miles Davis at leisure is quite different from Miles Davis at work. Gracious, talkative, humorous and warmly human, he is excellent company. When he was at The Plugged Nickel, we spent two afternoons and a night hanging out. The afternoons were spent for the most part in his Volkswagen bus (he still has the Ferrari) driving around the South Side as he talked and answered questions, a unique milieu in which to conduct an interview, it must be admitted. The night was passed at The Plugged Nickel where the Buddy Rich band worked on Miles' night off. That night Miles sat slumped at a table in front of the stand, not saying much but watching Rich like a hawk. (A good portion of the audience watched Miles watching.) Rich has seldom played better, and Miles made occasional knowing comments about what the master drummer was doing. "Did'cha notice the way he cut into the band there?" "Hear what that motherfucker did then? Just that little cymbal thing and it swung the whole fucking band." ... Before we got there, a car stopped beside us, and a man jumped out. It was Larry Jackson, who had played drums with Miles when both were boys in East St. Louis. He is now president of two Chicago locals of the United Steelworkers, a fact that Miles kidded him about unrelentingly. Rich's name came up, and Jackson said, "Miles always loved Buddy. He used to tell me all the time, 'Play like Buddy.' He always wanted the drummer to play like Buddy Rich." --- (Miles): "Buddy Rich is some different shit, man. How many Buddy Riches you got? You got one Buddy Rich. I'll tell you one thing, if Buddy's got a black audience, he plays different. You just get vibrations from black people that are swingier than from white. That's why when Mike Bloomfield plays before a black audience, his shit's gonna come out black." His own group's playing for a black audience is not much different. "There'd be just a slight change," he answered. "We'd just tighten up a little more, y'know. It's an inner thing. It's just like if you're playing basketball and you got five black brothers on the team, they got some inner shit going that you can't get from a white guy. Now, when you get a white guy in, you usually get him for strength or for some sort of shot . . . he's got a good eye or something. But that inner thing and that speed and that slick shit -- you got to have them brothers there because there are things that they do that they did when they were little kids that the white boy don't know about." Miles had hired the pianist Bill Evans, who is white, for the simplest possible reason: "I liked the way he sounded. "But he doesn't sound now like he did when he played with us. He sounds white now." But his ex-drummer, Tony Williams, a black man -- that's another matter. Williams is just possibly Miles' favorite musician. "Tony can swing and play his ass off. Tony Williams is a motherfucker. To me, the way you think about Buddy Rich is the way I think about Tony Williams. I don't think there's a drummer alive can do what Tony Williams can do. "When I play, I want whatever is going on to be going on. I don't want it to be no . . . well, to say bullshit is too easy an out. I want it to be . . . That's why I like Buddy and I like Tony, because if they do something, they're doing it. They're doing it to finish it, y'know. To end it. You know what I mean? If you were boxing a guy and he kept pressing you and you knew he wasn't gonna lighten up unless you get him off your ass by slipping and sliding, setting him up and feinting him, well, that's what Buddy and Tony are. They play the fucking drums. But they're different. They're the same, but they're different. Tony plays more rhythms and times than Buddy. "Buddy plays off his snare drum, but Tony can play all over the fucking drums -- but with a sound that matches the chords that you're playing. Buddy doesn't play any fucking chords." http://web.archive.org/web/20090126102156/http://www.rollingstone.com/artists/milesdavis/articles/story/9437639/miles_davis_the_rolling_stone_interview
  12. Kenny Burrell in 1948

    You rock, thanks!
  13. Kenny Burrell in 1948

    Sorry for the commercial, but I feel compelled to remind folks that my book "Jazz from Detroit" will be published in just three weeks on July 8 by the University of Michigan Press. The book explores Detroit's profound impact on jazz from the middle of the 20th Century until the present day. For more details -- including Playlists, various blog musings and music -- please visit my website: www.jazzfromdetroit.com. And if you'd like to pre-order, there's a discount code and link on the home page that will get you a 40% discount off of list price if you order through the U-M Press website. Re: the picture of Burrell and Flanagan. I had sought use of that photo for the book, but there were prohibitive issues in tracking down a Douglas family member to obtain rights. Even though the pictures are held in an archive at Cal State-Northridge, the university is not the copyright holder.
  14. Moderators: Can you please remove Adam's post on the first page in which he simply copies the entire NYT's article? The post is pure copyright infringement. It also embodies part of the reason why the newspaper industry has collapsed, partly why so many of my former colleagues are out of their jobs, and in its broader effects, partly why I left the Detroit Free Press (voluntarily) in 2016. Thanks in advance.
  15. Schubert 960

    Why "dreaded"?
  16. Joe Wilder

    Thanks for this. That's great stuff. I don't know this record at all, so I'll be on the look out. FWIW, I wrote a little about Joe a couple of years ago. https://www.facebook.com/mark.stryker.35/posts/771557693009068
  17. News. https://news.allaboutjazz.com/nobusiness-records-begins-sam-rivers-archive-series-with-a-previously-unreleased-trio-recording-from-1971.php?fbclid=IwAR2fX4NfF3LxBd0NpYERsbTQFYxJ8M_yXQFNlfsh7VEowuFhMljsZfZztio#.XOLE8eQ8n-g.twitter
  18. Roy's issues were common knowledge in Detroit, but pretty much off the radar of the wider jazz world, especially back in the day. The stories can be tough reading but they are sensitively done.
  19. Hey gang, Dropping in here to remind everyone that I'm posting regular journal entries relating to Detroit jazz history on the Musings page at the website for my book: All kinds of cool stuff. If the spirit moves, please have a look. Yes, this is a shameless attempt to drive traffic to the site. https://jazzfromdetroit.com/blog
  20. The Nessa Juggernaut rolls on

    This happened 52 years ago today. The Nessa Juggernaut has been rolling on for a long time ... Old/Quartet : Art Ensemble : Lester Bowie (tp) Roscoe Mitchell (as,hrn,whistle,tamb) Malachi Favors Maghostut (b) Phillip Wilson (d) Chicago, IL, May 18, 1967 Old Nessa N-5, NCD-27/28 [CD], NCD-2500 [CD] Theme statements - - Slow theme - - Bell song - - Fast theme - - Chinese song - - Tatas matoes (rehearsal) - - Quartet No 1 (group improvisation) - - Note: Nessa NCD-27/28 [CD] titled "Old/Quartet Sessions"; a 2 CD set. Nessa NCD-2500 [CD] titled "The Art Ensemble 1967/68"; a 5 CD set; according to the CD box "Roscoe Mitchell billed his group as the ART ENSEMBLE for a concert .on Dec 3 1966. This name was used for performances until June 1969 when the quartet of Roscoe Mitchell, Lester Bowie, Joseph Jarman & Malachi Favors Maghostut was advertised as the ART ENSEMBLE OF CHICAGO.
  21. Ernie Andrews (early years)

    The Tom Lord Discography lists a lot of Ernie Andrews 78s (or maybe in some cases 45s) on a variety of labels including King, Sparks, London, Trend, Aladdin, Gem -- that appear not to have ever been reissued in any form. Anybody know if that's true? Secondarily, what are good sources on LP or CD for early Andrews sides and any special recommendations?
  22. That photo of Wayne on the street was taken in April 1964, the same month he recorded "Night Dreamer" -- so I assume this was a shoot for the cover and then the design went in a different direction and it never got used. Amazing photo. Wayne in the wild.
  23. Kenny Burrell

    Washington Post has a story; https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/music/to-think-it-has-come-to-this-kenny-burrells-journey-from-jazz-legend-to-gofundme-appeal/2019/05/15/c57fb07e-7701-11e9-b7ae-390de4259661_story.html?utm_term=.83dc6228df38 Pat Metheny is quoted in this story. (BTW -- I had noticed his name a few days ago on the GoFundMe site as a contributor -- a generous gift of $2,500.)