JSngry

Return Of The Film Corner Thread

2,422 posts in this topic

9 hours ago, Larry Kart said:

:tup

Anthony Mann's "Men in War"

Sam Fuller's "Steel Helmet"

Thanks for the recs. Perhaps I need to re-see 1917, give it another chance. I mentioned Westfront 1918. This is a great movie, showing the War from the German point of view.  Speaking of which, Schlump by Hans Herbert Grimm, reissued in 2016 by New York Review of Books Classics, is a terrific book about the War from the German side. 

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Oddly enough, both of those films were set in the then present-day conflict, the Korean War, which gives them much immediacy.

A good deal more lurid is Robert Aldrich's "Attack!" (1957), set in World War II. Great performance by Eddie Albert as a cowardly commanding officer. It's the movie to see if you want to watch a German tank run over Jack Palance's arm. 

 

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1 hour ago, Larry Kart said:

 It's the movie to see if you want to watch a German tank run over Jack Palance's arm.

Are there no other options?

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6 hours ago, JSngry said:

Are there no other options?

Options for what? I mentioned that scene because it is iconically powerful in itself and leads to the film's shocking conclusion.

If you do see "Attack!" you'll know why the Defense Department refused to cooperate in the making of the film.

(Below) Palance versus (actually) two German tanks:
 

And there's a good deal more after this.

BTW, "Men in War" is the ultimate Aldo Ray movie.

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1 hour ago, jlhoots said:

Hester Street

Fantastic movie from Joan Micklin Street. When I was a kid being from Hester Street was not considered a good thing. When we misbehaved, my grandmother (and people of her generation) would say that “you act like you were brought up on Hester Street.”

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3 hours ago, Larry Kart said:

Options for what?

Options for movies to see if you want to watch a German tank run over Jack Palance's arm.

If there's options, let's have 'em now, so I can get busy. Life's short, ya' know.

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On 2/15/2020 at 2:07 PM, Brad said:

This is excellent, a semi fictional look at the collapse of Lehman Brothers.  Just as good as The Big Short, which was a tremendous movie. 

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That's as well-acted a film as I've seen in awhile.  Even Demi Moore is good.  Some real heavyweights here, especially Jeremy Irons who perfectly captures the greed and avarice that characterized Wall Street before the fall.  The scene where he makes his first appearance is riveting.  I'm a fan of The Big Short" as well, but if I had to choose between the two, I'd have to go with "Margin Call."  No aesthetic distance here...it's a film that really draws you in and makes you feel like you have seat at the table. 

Edited by Dave James

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2 hours ago, Dave James said:

That's as well-acted a film as I've seen in awhile.  Even Demi Moore is good.  Some real heavyweights here, especially Jeremy Irons who perfectly captures the greed and avarice that characterized Wall Street before the fall.  The scene where he makes his first appearance is riveting.  I'm a fan of The Big Short" as well, but if I had to choose between the two, I'd have to go with "Margin Call."  No aesthetic distance here...it's a film that really draws you in and makes you feel like you have seat at the table. 

I got a kick out of the name of the  Irons character: John Tuld vs Lehman’s Richard Fuld.

I never read The Big Short but did read Charles Gasparino’s The Sellout. Pretty amazing. 

Edited by Brad

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6 hours ago, Brad said:

I got a kick out of the name of the  Irons character: John Tuld vs Lehman’s Richard Fuld.

I never read The Big Short but did read Charles Gasparino’s The Sellout. Pretty amazing. 

"Liar's Poker" by Michael Lewis and "Den Of Thieves" by James B. Stewart are also excellent reads. 

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On 2/23/2020 at 11:58 PM, soulpope said:

Anmerkung-2020-02-23-085643.jpg

If you watch this one in 4K with a subwoofer, prepare to be knocked out of your chair!

 

 

 

gregmo

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Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson & The Band

Portrait Of A Lady On Fire

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Free State of Jones

Totally fascinating for someone who knew absolutely nothing about the subject. Well acted and dramatised without sacrificing historical nuance from what I can gather with some follow-up reading.

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Posted (edited)

Watched a nice movie with my flu-bound wife last night.  "Last Chance Harvey", starring Dustin Hoffman and Emma Thompson.  It struck a lot of chords with me on alienation, the impact of divorce on kids, aging, career "settling" , elder care, etc.  Look foreward to seeing it again.  Filmed ca. 2009.

Edited by felser

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First time watching Bresson's Diary of a Country Priest

I found it incredibly dreary and not remotely compelling. 

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Last night I watched this triple feature:

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Charles Laughton is superb and well deserved the Best Actor Oscar awarded him for his work.  The actresses portraying his wives are also splendid, Merle Oberon,  Wendy Barrie, Binnie Barnes and the wonderful Elsa Lanchester.

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An odd docudrama about Bob Mizer, who was sort of a low-rent, gay version of Hugh Hefner as a pioneering purveyor of "adult entertainment", in Mr. Mizer's case, as the photographer and publisher behind Physique Pictorial, a "men's fitness" magazine which featured very scantily clad (later to be fully naked) young men.  The film includes interview segments with men who were actually around and part of the scene back in the L.A. of the late 1940's-1950's, the two gentlemen listed on the above DVD cover being the most well known names.  The film also dramatizes events to show the rise of and some of the heyday of Mr. Mizer's photographic and filmmaking career.  This part seems a bit too campy and less seedy than the reality likely was.  The movie just kind of winds down around 1964, even though Mr. Mizer continued on with his work/passion until his death in 1992.

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Apocalypse Now. Still a strange movie. 

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4 hours ago, Brad said:

Apocalypse Now. Still a strange movie. 

Was that "the final cut"?  I thought he should have cut some more.   (The French plantation scene makes no sense to me and slows the film down a lot.) 

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2 hours ago, medjuck said:

Was that "the final cut"?  I thought he should have cut some more.   (The French plantation scene makes no sense to me and slows the film down a lot.) 

It wasn’t the final cut because there’s no plantation scene. The movie ends with Martin Sheen saying “the horror.” The way I remember it when I first saw it was with Kurtz’s being destroyed and the Doors singing. I was expecting this when I saw it last night so that surprised me.  

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3 hours ago, Brad said:

It wasn’t the final cut because there’s no plantation scene. The movie ends with Martin Sheen saying “the horror.” The way I remember it when I first saw it was with Kurtz’s being destroyed and the Doors singing. I was expecting this when I saw it last night so that surprised me.  

I'm no longer sure what that version is, I've seen so many different ones. 

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