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Dmitry

The Great Day in Harlem photo - which of them did you see live?

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On 3/22/2019 at 0:02 AM, medjuck said:

Wow! Must be a record. 

The record would belong to either Benny or Sonny, were they to post in this thread. That would be da bomb. :g 

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Back to the Mary Lou/Cecil concert - I think I hear it a little differently than most other people. It doesn't quite work, but to my ears it almost does. And the degree to which it almost works is entirely due to Taylor, not to Williams. Most people hear two very different pianists inflexibly going their own way. I think that's true of Williams, but I hear Cecil "leaning in" towards Mary Lou's world. His rippling phrases are often abstract, fun-house-mirror reflections of what Williams is playing.

It reminds of of the Cecil Taylor/Derek Bailey concert recording on FMP. Again, Cecil's partner does nothing to accommodate the pianist, and just goes his own way. But Taylor listens carefully, and adjusts his style to Bailey's. The FMP album works better than the Williams/Taylor concert, because Bailey and Taylor were closer stylistically to begin with. But I hear Taylor at least trying to make something happen with Williams.

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Art Blakey, Johnny Griffin, Marian McPartland, Vic Dickenson, Count Basie, Gerry Mulligan, Dizzy Gillespie.

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1 hour ago, Jazzmonkie said:

Art Blakey, Johnny Griffin, Marian McPartland, Vic Dickenson, Count Basie, Gerry Mulligan, Dizzy Gillespie.

Welcome, sounds like you've come to the right neighborhood!

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On 3/29/2019 at 8:51 PM, jeffcrom said:

Back to the Mary Lou/Cecil concert - I think I hear it a little differently than most other people. It doesn't quite work, but to my ears it almost does. And the degree to which it almost works is entirely due to Taylor, not to Williams. Most people hear two very different pianists inflexibly going their own way. I think that's true of Williams, but I hear Cecil "leaning in" towards Mary Lou's world. His rippling phrases are often abstract, fun-house-mirror reflections of what Williams is playing.

It reminds of of the Cecil Taylor/Derek Bailey concert recording on FMP. Again, Cecil's partner does nothing to accommodate the pianist, and just goes his own way. But Taylor listens carefully, and adjusts his style to Bailey's. The FMP album works better than the Williams/Taylor concert, because Bailey and Taylor were closer stylistically to begin with. But I hear Taylor at least trying to make something happen with Williams.

Great observation.

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Only Sonny unfortunately. And I am going to see Mr. Golson this year.

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I've seen Benny Golson, Sonny Rollins, Horace Silver, Count Basie, Hank Jones and Johnny Griffin. 

Edited by Hardbopjazz

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I´ve seen Benny Golson, Art Farmer, Art Blakey, Johnny Griffin, Sonny Rollins, Dizzy Gillespie

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An interesting exercise, and one I had not even thought about even though I have a copy of the picture hanging over the couch at my cottage in Ontario.  My list (as far as I can remember): Golson, Farmer, Blakey, Griffin, Mingus, Krupa, Kaminsky, Freeman, H. Jones, Silver, Sullivan, Rushing, Hawkins, Shihab, McPartland, Rollins, Williams, Hinton, Heard, Mulligan, Eldridge, Gillespie, Basie.  Several of these performers I was dragged off to see by my folks when I was a kid, which I may not have been totally happy about back then, but am deeply thankful for now.  Despite the fact that he was perhaps my father's favorite jazz musician of all, I somehow missed seeing Thelonious Monk, which has to go down as the biggest miss of my musical life.

Edited by Al in NYC

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On ‎30‎.‎03‎.‎2019 at 5:26 PM, Hardbopjazz said:

Horace Silver

I would have liked to see him live. As much as I remember, a really strange thing was he never was scheduled on the many jazz concerts and festivals I attended from 1977-1985. Almost all the legendary musicans could be seen and heard live then, but is it possible that Horace Silver was not touring much then? Or at least he wasn´t doin Europe....... maybe....

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14 minutes ago, Gheorghe said:

I would have liked to see him live. As much as I remember, a really strange thing was he never was scheduled on the many jazz concerts and festivals I attended from 1977-1985. Almost all the legendary musicans could be seen and heard live then, but is it possible that Horace Silver was not touring much then? Or at least he wasn´t doin Europe....... maybe....

I never got to see him either - I don’t think he was touring that much in Europe and when he did appear here in the UK during that period I think it was at Ronnie Scotts during periods when I was out of town. Maybe his residence in the LA area made such sojourns a bit of a trek?  I can recall hearing of some appearances in the mid to late 70s, less so the Silveto years of the 1980s.

Edited by sidewinder

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4 hours ago, Gheorghe said:

I would have liked to see him live. As much as I remember, a really strange thing was he never was scheduled on the many jazz concerts and festivals I attended from 1977-1985. Almost all the legendary musicans could be seen and heard live then, but is it possible that Horace Silver was not touring much then? Or at least he wasn´t doin Europe....... maybe....

I saw him in Fort Worth in 1984, 1985 and 1987--a total of nine sets.

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