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duaneiac

Bob Gibson -- RIP

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Even though I knew this day was coming, this one really hurts.

Hall of Famer Bob Gibson, the dominating St. Louis Cardinals pitcher who won a record seven consecutive World Series starts and set a modern standard for excellence when he finished the 1968 season with a 1.12 ERA, died Friday. He was 84.  He had long been ill with pancreatic cancer in his hometown of Omaha, Nebraska.

Gibson’s death came on the 52nd anniversary of perhaps his most overpowering performance, when he struck out a World Series record 17 batters in Game 1 of the 1968 World Series against Detroit.

One of baseball’s most uncompromising competitors, the two-time Cy Young Award winner spent his entire 17-year career with St. Louis and was named the World Series MVP in their 1964 and ’67 championship seasons. The Cards came up just short in 1968, but Gibson was voted the National League’s MVP and shut down opponents so well that baseball changed the rules for fear it would happen again.

Gibson died less than a month after the death of a longtime teammate, Hall of Fame outfielder Lou Brock.

Rest in Peace, Mr. Gibson.

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https://www.yahoo.com/news/bob-gibson-legendary-cardinal-second-132452822.html

 

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RIP.  
two of greatest pitchers I ever seen died a few weeks apart from each other.  

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Seaver - Brock - Gibson :(

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What an amazing pitcher he was. Intense and fast as lightning. There's a nice eulogy/analysis of him here by Steven Goldman.

 

 

 

gregmo

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More responsible than any other person for beating the Red Sox in ‘67. Our Cy Young winner, Jim Lonborg, just couldn’t match up with two days rest for game 7.

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Posted (edited)

One of my first baseball cards (either a 1974 or 1975 Topps, can’t recall which year exactly, but it was at the end of his career), and an early favorite, though he was in his twilight when I started following baseball as a kid. What a competitor. His 1968 season might be the greatest by a pitcher in the modern era. 13 shutouts! I think that’s probably the collective total for an entire league these days.

Edited by ghost of miles

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