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Larry Kart

Pet peeve

21 posts in this topic

Headline today:  "NFL refutes NFLPA’s assertion the league never asked for vaccine mandate"

"Refute" means that one PROVED, through evidence or argument, that the assertion was false.

All the NFL did here was DENY that the NFLPA’s  assertion was true.

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We had a situation here with the DSO a few years ago where they had to reflute.

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37 minutes ago, JSngry said:

We had a situation here with the DSO a few years ago where they had to reflute.

Brilliant oboist Ray Stills demanded that the CSO reflute several decades ago because he hated flutist Donald Peck. When Still had his big dispute with conductor Jean Martinon (Martinon wanted to fire him for insubordination -- Stills for sure could be a dick), the undeniably talented Peck, along with some other members of the orchestra, sided with Martinon. The dispute eventually was decided in Stills' favor. That Stills and Peck sat side by side didn't help.

BTW, a former pupil of Stills told me that Ray's favorite musican was Lester Young.

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So, he did or did not Prez his case about the refluting?

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Posted (edited)

57 minutes ago, Larry Kart said:

Headline today:  "NFL refutes NFLPA’s assertion the league never asked for vaccine mandate"

"Refute" means that one PROVED, through evidence or argument, that the assertion was false.

All the NFL did here was DENY that the NFLPA’s  assertion was true.

Completely agreed. That solecism has become common in Internet journalism, seemingly just in the past few years. [The only physical journalism I read is The Economist, which can be relied on to avoid such horrors.]

Standards have become so low that I just roll my eyes and ignore these things. Otherwise I'd soon have a stroke.

Edited by T.D.

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It came down to a union matter, and Stills prevailed in arbitration. OTOH, no way could Ray or any other CSO member get another CSO member fired unless it was for gross incompetence or outrageous extra-musical behavior. Peck was a fine player, and again he was not the only CSO member who sided with Martinon in the Stills-Martinon dispute. Co-concertmaster Victor Aitay was another.

IIRC, one of Martinon's complaints was that Stills listened to a ballgame on a portable radio (albeit through earphones) during a performance when there were passages where Stills didn't have to play -- Stills being quite visible to the audience when (and if) he did so. If so, again, I'd say that was pretty outrageous.

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What ballgame was it, Sox or Cubs or Bears or Bulls or Blackhawks. Regular season or post-season? That detail matters!

I get that it's  a symphony gig, but c'mon...I aw the Buckner fiasco go down in real time while playing some bar band tune, I forget which. It's not like a pro doesn't know how to multi-task.

There are other worlds they have not told you of. :g

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Probably the Cubs. At the root of it all was that Ray was/could be a dick, and that he was contemptuous of Martinon. OTOH, Ray played under Reiner when Reiner was at Pittsburgh, and when Reiner, now with the CSO, admonished Ray for not playing a tricky passage properly and Ray shot back that Fritz had praised him for the way he had played that very passage  when he was at Pittsburgh, Fritz replied, "Was that with the Pirates?"

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Ah yes, the Mazeroski Gambit, a favorite of conductors everywhere!

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Saw an article the other day where they used the word "commence" to describe the conclusion of something. 

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44 minutes ago, trane_fanatic said:

Saw an article the other day where they used the word "commence" to describe the conclusion of something. 

In the US don't you conclude university studies with something called "commencement"?

Over here it's simply called "graduation".

 

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3 minutes ago, BillF said:

In the US don't you conclude university studies with something called "commencement"?

Over here it's simply called "graduation".

 

I typically hear it as a commencement speech made at graduation (here in the US)

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1 hour ago, Dub Modal said:

I typically hear it as a commencement speech made at graduation (here in the US)

Can see why it's commonly confused. The "commencement" marks the start of something new after graduating. 

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5 hours ago, Larry Kart said:

It came down to a union matter, and Stills prevailed in arbitration. OTOH, no way could Ray or any other CSO member get another CSO member fired unless it was for gross incompetence or outrageous extra-musical behavior. Peck was a fine player, and again he was not the only CSO member who sided with Martinon in the Stills-Martinon dispute. Co-concertmaster Victor Aitay was another.

IIRC, one of Martinon's complaints was that Stills listened to a ballgame on a portable radio (albeit through earphones) during a performance when there were passages where Stills didn't have to play -- Stills being quite visible to the audience when (and if) he did so. If so, again, I'd say that was pretty outrageous.

I played a musical where the bass player had his freaking phone out whenever he had any rests. The drummer and I would crack up whenever he missed cues and entrances because he was too busy looking at his stupid phone. After a few nights of this, he noticed we were making fun of him, because we were hysterical with laughter at all his mistakes.

He never spoke to us again. Later, I found out that he had been fired because he couldn't handle Les Mis.

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I was reminded of one of my pet peeves this morning - the medical profession's use of the word "obese."

The common usage refers to folks who are grossly overweight, but doctors use it to describe those of us who should lose a few pounds.

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Being obese is not the same thing as being overweight. When your medical provider expresses concern about obesity, she's saying you have a medical condition that puts you at much greater risk for diabetes, heart disease and cancer. The average person often shrugs off suggestions to "lose weight", but being diagnosed as "morbidly obese" carries a more serious medical prognosis. This is especially important when you're talking about children.

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BMI charts have a technical (numerical) definition for “obese”. I know, because I’ve fit that definition for most of the last 15-20 years.

I doubt the technical (medical, numerical) definition of the term has changed in 40 years, but our perceptions of what should qualify as “obese” has been a moving goalpost, as the population (myself included) has gotten heavier, and heavier over the last several decades.

My current BMI is slightly over 32 — but anything over 30 is (medically speaking) “obese”. I’m still pretty proud of that 32, because it was over 36 a year ago (and I’ve lost 30 lbs since then).

if you’re currently a BMI of 31, then medically speaking you’re “obese” — but (yes) loosing a few pounds would put you down into the lower “overweight” category — as little as 10–15 lbs, depending on one’s height.

Source: I’ve let myself become a lard-ass for most of the last 10 years — although I did get down to a BMI of 29.3 about 6-7 years ago, but immediately let myself go again.

Edited by Rooster_Ties

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People who say nauseous when they mean nauseated.

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Capable of causing nausea vs. being sick to your stomach. Not the same . Also not a big deal - but we were discussing pet peeves which can often be trivial.

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