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A Lark Ascending

Death of the iPod (Everyone's buying vinyl)

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Those who own a iPod classic, hang onto it. There is a hard drive now that fits in it that holds 240 gigs. It isn't cheap (around $300) but wow... 240 gigs!

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Those who own a iPod classic, hang onto it. There is a hard drive now that fits in it that holds 240 gigs. It isn't cheap (around $300) but wow... 240 gigs!

Where can I get more information on this? Thanks

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Those who own a iPod classic, hang onto it. There is a hard drive now that fits in it that holds 240 gigs. It isn't cheap (around $300) but wow... 240 gigs!

Now that's the sort of thing I want to hear.

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Those who own a iPod classic, hang onto it. There is a hard drive now that fits in it that holds 240 gigs. It isn't cheap (around $300) but wow... 240 gigs!

This conversion would only make sense if they also replace the battery. The battery on my 120gb iPod has been shot for a long time now.

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Same with my 4th gen iPod Touch. It has taken up permanent residence in my glove compartment which has a plug in for iDevices. If I don't go anywhere over the weekend, the battery is dead when I leave for work Monday morning.

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Has anyone written about the downside of having access to anything we want instantaneously and for (relatively) free? It seems to me that it is a double-edged sword which may be contributing to the devaluing of music and art in general.

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Yeah, that's been discussed at length, but I think it was in another thread. Possibly the Spotify thread.

It probably is for younger generations that are coming up in this instant age, but I doubt it's changed for most of us "older" folks.

Though, the term "devaluing" may be a bit strong. It's almost akin to saying that recording and mass distributing music devalued it back in the day. But did it? It changed consumption habits, to be sure. I'd think there were a bunch of curmudgeons sitting around back then saying, "these goddamn kids and their fancy phonographs don't appreciate the value of hearing a live performance!"

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Though, the term "devaluing" may be a bit strong. It's almost akin to saying that recording and mass distributing music devalued it back in the day. But did it? It changed consumption habits, to be sure. I'd think there were a bunch of curmudgeons sitting around back then saying, "these goddamn kids and their fancy phonographs don't appreciate the value of hearing a live performance!"

Well, there is some truth in that these days.

I do think music is devalued due in part to the ease of access and also to the fact that it is ubiquitous. Everywhere you go, all the time, there is music constantly. Ubiquity breeds complacency?

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I dunno. Has the internet devalued reading and writing?

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Well, there is some truth in that these days.

I do think music is devalued due in part to the ease of access and also to the fact that it is ubiquitous. Everywhere you go, all the time, there is music constantly. Ubiquity breeds complacency?

Yeah, I can see the point. I'm just not entirely convinced. Though, I have to ask, complacency in what respect? If the end user is still listening to the music and thoroughly enjoying it, does the consumption habit somehow change the entire dynamic? Hell, I'd even postulate that the ubiquity would lead to even greater consumption. What I mean is that end users would "grow tired" of a particular album faster, and by virtue of being able to easily move on, expand their listening base further and faster. That's not really a bad thing, is it? Mind expansion on fast forward?

I dunno. Has the internet devalued reading and writing?

No, but texting sure as hell has!

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If the end user is still listening to the music and thoroughly enjoying it, does the consumption habit somehow change the entire dynamic?

For the content creators it certainly has, yes. You cannot make a living on streaming royalties, even if you're Pharrell.

http://mediaor.com/post/104921631679/martin-bandier-us-streaming-rates-are

John Legend’s All Of Me, which has a Grammy nomination for Best Pop Solo Performance, was streamed 55 million times on Pandora during the first three months of 2014, said Bandier. That generated $3,400 in publisher and songwriter royalties.

Meanwhile, Pharrell Williams’ Happy had 43 million Pandora plays over the period, and $2,700 in publisher and songwriter royalties.

We live in an amazing time where someone like me can produce an album like THEO (which strained my capabilities in many regards... musically, technically, technologically, etc.) in a basement studio. That's incredible and inspiring to me. But there's the flip side; who is going to hear it? And more to the point, who is going to pay to hear it? I am not only competing with my contemporaries any time I release an album but I'm also competing with 90+ years of recordings by long-dead artists (or artists long past their prime) and all the other entertainment choices that compete for people's hard-earned money. And when making the decision to spend money a lot of people opt for free streaming or paying the miniscule monthly fees.

Vinyl at least presents a revenue source, even though the format should have died. Don't get me wrong, I like listening to vinyl but I recognize it's really only about nostalgia and not sound quality. I think surround sound is much more engaging and exciting and even regular digital stereo sounds far superior.

I certainly don't know what the answer is. And I don't even know if more consumption is a good thing. The reason I know a handful of albums backwards and forwards is because they are all I had for years and years. The intimacy from those experiences definitely shaped who I am as a musician. Does endless consumption lead to endless dilution? Is that a good or bad thing? I don't know.

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Don't get me wrong, I like listening to vinyl but I recognize it's really only about nostalgia and not sound quality. I think surround sound is much more engaging and exciting and even regular digital stereo sounds far superior.

R.I.P., Mr. Alfredson...

;)

If that comment doesn't have the wolves chomping on your ass it's only because they fear you as the owner of this site.

*edit*

Didn't mean to discount the rest of that excellent post, but I need to think a little more on the subject before offering up anything intelligent in response.

Suffice it to say, I share your concerns.

Edited by Scott Dolan

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I do have some thoughts, if not an overarching response.

I do think music is devalued due in part to the ease of access and also to the fact that it is ubiquitous. Everywhere you go, all the time, there is music constantly. Ubiquity breeds complacency?

Music, at least during my lifetime, has always been around: in my house (when I was younger, on the radio; then my 45s, then LPs, etc.), in stores (usually a radio in the background or a sound system), in elevators (Muzak). The difference is that today there is better music surrounding us, more to our tastes (though don't get me started on rap music and hip hop).

We live in an amazing time where someone like me can produce an album like THEO (which strained my capabilities in many regards... musically, technically, technologically, etc.) in a basement studio. That's incredible and inspiring to me. But there's the flip side; who is going to hear it? And more to the point, who is going to pay to hear it? I am not only competing with my contemporaries any time I release an album but I'm also competing with 90+ years of recordings by long-dead artists (or artists long past their prime) and all the other entertainment choices that compete for people's hard-earned money. (A) And when making the decision to spend money a lot of people opt for free streaming or paying the miniscule monthly fees.

Vinyl at least presents a revenue source, even though the format should have died. (B) Don't get me wrong, I like listening to vinyl but I recognize it's really only about nostalgia and not sound quality. I think surround sound is much more engaging and exciting and even regular digital stereo sounds far superior.

I certainly don't know what the answer is. And I don't even know if more consumption is a good thing. The reason I know a handful of albums backwards and forwards is because they are all I had for years and years. The intimacy from those experiences definitely shaped who I am as a musician. Does endless consumption lead to endless dilution? Is that a good or bad thing? I don't know. ©

(A) Don't know if this will make you feel better (probably not), but we face similar dilemmas as music consumers and listeners. I have a backlog of probably hundreds of albums I haven't yet listened to; I buy more than I can conceivably enjoy. Partly it's due to when I find bargains, or when I find rarities, and sometimes just to help "the music." While I can't solve the dilemma of listening to all of it, I get a lot of happiness out of listening to each one.

(B) If vinyl's selling for you, don't sweat it; enjoy the sales.

© I don't think that endless consumption leads to endless dilution; every new album we listen to builds on the knowledge and perspective we've attained from prior listening.

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They still support Izod, no?

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They still support Izod, no?

izod-general-zod-ipod.jpg

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Kneel before iZod!

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You made a Prog record in your basement.

Yeah, I know. It's crazy. The drums sound HUGE and they were recorded in a 12ft x 20ft 1970's wood-paneled rec room with 7ft ceilings. It's amazing what you can do if you have the patience and knowledge. A lot of it was recorded on the road in hotel rooms as well and all the bass was done by Gary in either Los Angeles or Florida on his laptop with a cheap two channel interface and ProTools LE.

Don't get me wrong, I like listening to vinyl but I recognize it's really only about nostalgia and not sound quality. I think surround sound is much more engaging and exciting and even regular digital stereo sounds far superior.

R.I.P., Mr. Alfredson...

;)

If that comment doesn't have the wolves chomping on your ass it's only because they fear you as the owner of this site.

*edit*

Didn't mean to discount the rest of that excellent post, but I need to think a little more on the subject before offering up anything intelligent in response.

Suffice it to say, I share your concerns.

Nobody needs to fear having an opinion about sound. However, as subjective as sound is the specs for modern digital don't lie.

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You made a Prog record in your basement.

Yeah, I know. It's crazy. The drums sound HUGE and they were recorded in a 12ft x 20ft 1970's wood-paneled rec room with 7ft ceilings. It's amazing what you can do if you have the patience and knowledge.

I believe it was Stefan Wood who was recently arguing with me that you can't build home studios that rival, or at least come adequately close enough, to professional studios. I know folks who have done it, and have read about many others. If you have the time, patience, and money it can be done.

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I never discussed this with you. I have no knowledge of what goes into building a home studio. It's not my field.

Edited by Stefan Wood

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Sorry about that, brother. For some reason I thought it was you.

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I believe it was Stefan Wood who was recently arguing with me that you can't build home studios that rival, or at least come adequately close enough, to professional studios. I know folks who have done it, and have read about many others. If you have the time, patience, and money it can be done.

Honestly, it doesn't even take that much money these days. It used to be you had to spend $3000+ just to get ONE good condenser microphone. None of the mics I use cost more than $500 new and I certainly didn't pay retail for any of them. And do-it-yourself acoustical treatment is dirt cheap.

I am lucky to be good friends with a local studio owner (Glenn Brown) who has all the great outboard analog toys that make everything sound amazing and the ears to use them. I've learned everything I know about engineering from him. But we didn't really use much of that expensive outboard gear on THEO. I mixed it "in the box" (computer) and he used his regular mastering chain on it. That was it. There were a couple of things we fixed in the box and I had to purchase some plug-ins to do it right, but he guided that process and the results speak for themselves. The record sounds amazing. All dynamic processing, all the effects, all the EQ was done in the box except for the final mastering compression and limiting.

Even the piano is "in the box". I've had so many people ask me what piano I recorded and it's actually the Pianoteq plug-in.

BTW, Scott... we've talked before about Roger Waters and Amused To Death. Knowing you dig that album, I think you'd like THEO.

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Ah, it was Shawn.

But yeah, home studio technology is just off the charts these days. It's not sub par mixers with cheap MIDI plug-ins anymore.

When I get off work today I'll definitely check out THEO, Jim! Thanks for the heads up. :tup

Oddly enough, I was just listening to Amused To Death about three weeks ago. Two things struck me: how well it's held up over time, and how much more I seem to like it each and every time I listen to it. And I started out loving it to begin with. I'd like to say that The Endless River is just as good, but I honestly can't. And The Endless River is an excellent, excellent album.

Edited by Scott Dolan

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