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JSngry

What Things Will You Not Like In Your Jazz?

180 posts in this topic

Nobody having a score on the game between tunes.

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"Art"

Tatum, Taylor? The latter's squealing drum chair in RVG's studio?

Edited by king ubu

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I'm not much of a fan of any kind of bass solo, but I particularly dislike bowed bass solos, especially those orchestrated by Paul Chambers. He always sounds to me like he's trying to saw his instrument in two.

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Sponsorship.

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In most cases, strings and orchestras. They are nearly always arranged like Tchaikovsky when jazz is better arranged like Stravinsky or Bartok.

Would Focus be your Platonic example of the latter?

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Digipaks, especially the ones where the teeth are pre-broken.

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Wholly avoidable and irrelevant sloppiness being considered "spontaneity".

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Al really cut to the chase.

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Sponsorship.

Now there I think I disagree with you. Experience with Senegalese music inclines me to think that sponsorship is - or can be - a good thing.

Commercial sponsorship enabled the Senegalese music industry to beat pirates who were selling about 80% of all albums in Senegal in the 70s and early 80s, by reducing the price of K7s to a competitive level. I can't find on the web any examples of album sleeves actually containing adverts for products like Nescafe frappe, or Baralait (a baby milk formula), but I have them myself. The albums all contain a song praising their sponsored products. The music industry in Senegal would have been destroyed without this sponsorship. With it, the pirates have been driven out of the market.

Here's the website for the 20th St Louis Jazz Festival, sponsored by the government and about 40 firms whose logos appear at the bottom of the page. No well known American jazz musicians this year but past years have featured Parlan, Shepp, Lucky Petersen, Roy Haynes, Louis Sclavis, Randy Weston, Jack DeJohnette, McCoy Tyner and the Elite Swingsters.

MG

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Bartenders treating musicians like their employees.

Sponsorship.

Now there I think I disagree with you. Experience with Senegalese music inclines me to think that sponsorship is - or can be - a good thing.

Commercial sponsorship enabled the Senegalese music industry to beat pirates who were selling about 80% of all albums in Senegal in the 70s and early 80s, by reducing the price of K7s to a competitive level. I can't find on the web any examples of album sleeves actually containing adverts for products like Nescafe frappe, or Baralait (a baby milk formula), but I have them myself. The albums all contain a song praising their sponsored products. The music industry in Senegal would have been destroyed without this sponsorship. With it, the pirates have been driven out of the market.

Here's the website for the 20th St Louis Jazz Festival, sponsored by the government and about 40 firms whose logos appear at the bottom of the page. No well known American jazz musicians this year but past years have featured Parlan, Shepp, Lucky Petersen, Roy Haynes, Louis Sclavis, Randy Weston, Jack DeJohnette, McCoy Tyner and the Elite Swingsters.

MG

No doubt.

However, I've had experience with sponsorship of the type where the music is there just to pimp the sponsor and you're expected to act all....endorseful and shit b/c of your participation. Not happy when that happens.

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Those pianos used to "recreate" (for instance) Art Tatum performances.

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Bartenders treating musicians like their employees.

Sponsorship.

Now there I think I disagree with you. Experience with Senegalese music inclines me to think that sponsorship is - or can be - a good thing.

Commercial sponsorship enabled the Senegalese music industry to beat pirates who were selling about 80% of all albums in Senegal in the 70s and early 80s, by reducing the price of K7s to a competitive level. I can't find on the web any examples of album sleeves actually containing adverts for products like Nescafe frappe, or Baralait (a baby milk formula), but I have them myself. The albums all contain a song praising their sponsored products. The music industry in Senegal would have been destroyed without this sponsorship. With it, the pirates have been driven out of the market.

Here's the website for the 20th St Louis Jazz Festival, sponsored by the government and about 40 firms whose logos appear at the bottom of the page. No well known American jazz musicians this year but past years have featured Parlan, Shepp, Lucky Petersen, Roy Haynes, Louis Sclavis, Randy Weston, Jack DeJohnette, McCoy Tyner and the Elite Swingsters.

MG

No doubt.

However, I've had experience with sponsorship of the type where the music is there just to pimp the sponsor and you're expected to act all....endorseful and shit b/c of your participation. Not happy when that happens.

No doubt you have. I think I said something relevant about you lot over there being different to us lot over here in the Americana thread. Take it as read :)

MG

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Those pianos used to "recreate" (for instance) Art Tatum performances.

The concept doesn't seem to have taken off.

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Diving off the speaker stacks.

Crowd-surfing an audience of four.

I can't think of a damned thing that I wouldn't rule out in any and all circumstances.

Did I hear you correctly...?

Heh heh.

Yeah, but obviously I didn't speak correctly... :lol:

Digipaks, especially the ones where the teeth are pre-broken.

Okay, I stand corrected. Good one.

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Toy instruments. Or any toys, for that matter.

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But we're all luddites, aren't we? I thought, btw, for a long time, that word was a derivation of the Latin verb "ludere" (to play) :crazy:

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"I ain't mad at you pretty baby, I ain't mad at you."

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In most cases, strings and orchestras. They are nearly always arranged like Tchaikovsky when jazz is better arranged like Stravinsky or Bartok.

Would Focus be your Platonic example of the latter?

A while since I heard it. Seem to recall it being more 20thC in its approach.

**********

People at jazz concerts (or any concert) who seem to need to let everyone know they are there by shouting, whooping or whistling. But that's probably my British stiff upper lip talking.

Non US vocalists trying to sound native!

Non-English speaking vocalists singing in English (especially Brazilians). Sing in your own language. I like the mystery of being clueless about what you are saying.

Edited by A Lark Ascending

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Young jazz musicians who look like they are roadies for Nirvana or Wilco (or insert your alternative band here).

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People at jazz concerts (or any concert) who seem to need to let everyone know they are there by shouting, whooping or whistling. But that's probably my British stiff upper lip talking.

Non US vocalists trying to sound native!

Non-English speaking vocalists singing in English (especially Brazilians). Sing in your own language. I like the mystery of being clueless about what you are saying.

Even if they're making fun of all the stiff upper lips in the audience? :w

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People at jazz concerts (or any concert) who seem to need to let everyone know they are there by shouting, whooping or whistling. But that's probably my British stiff upper lip talking.

Non US vocalists trying to sound native!

Non-English speaking vocalists singing in English (especially Brazilians). Sing in your own language. I like the mystery of being clueless about what you are saying.

Even if they're making fun of all the stiff upper lips in the audience? :w

Can't understand them so they can be singing about what they like. Actually, it tends to be worse when the translate lyrics from the native language into English!

I'm sure Stacey Kent singing in French sounds awful to the French.

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People at jazz concerts (or any concert) who seem to need to let everyone know they are there by shouting, whooping or whistling. But that's probably my British stiff upper lip talking.

No, it's because you've never seen Dr Lonnie Smith live, Bev :ph34r:

MG

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