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What Things Will You Not Like In Your Jazz?


JSngry
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Sponsorship.

Now there I think I disagree with you. Experience with Senegalese music inclines me to think that sponsorship is - or can be - a good thing.

Commercial sponsorship enabled the Senegalese music industry to beat pirates who were selling about 80% of all albums in Senegal in the 70s and early 80s, by reducing the price of K7s to a competitive level. I can't find on the web any examples of album sleeves actually containing adverts for products like Nescafe frappe, or Baralait (a baby milk formula), but I have them myself. The albums all contain a song praising their sponsored products. The music industry in Senegal would have been destroyed without this sponsorship. With it, the pirates have been driven out of the market.

Here's the website for the 20th St Louis Jazz Festival, sponsored by the government and about 40 firms whose logos appear at the bottom of the page. No well known American jazz musicians this year but past years have featured Parlan, Shepp, Lucky Petersen, Roy Haynes, Louis Sclavis, Randy Weston, Jack DeJohnette, McCoy Tyner and the Elite Swingsters.

MG

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Bartenders treating musicians like their employees.

Sponsorship.

Now there I think I disagree with you. Experience with Senegalese music inclines me to think that sponsorship is - or can be - a good thing.

Commercial sponsorship enabled the Senegalese music industry to beat pirates who were selling about 80% of all albums in Senegal in the 70s and early 80s, by reducing the price of K7s to a competitive level. I can't find on the web any examples of album sleeves actually containing adverts for products like Nescafe frappe, or Baralait (a baby milk formula), but I have them myself. The albums all contain a song praising their sponsored products. The music industry in Senegal would have been destroyed without this sponsorship. With it, the pirates have been driven out of the market.

Here's the website for the 20th St Louis Jazz Festival, sponsored by the government and about 40 firms whose logos appear at the bottom of the page. No well known American jazz musicians this year but past years have featured Parlan, Shepp, Lucky Petersen, Roy Haynes, Louis Sclavis, Randy Weston, Jack DeJohnette, McCoy Tyner and the Elite Swingsters.

MG

No doubt.

However, I've had experience with sponsorship of the type where the music is there just to pimp the sponsor and you're expected to act all....endorseful and shit b/c of your participation. Not happy when that happens.

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Bartenders treating musicians like their employees.

Sponsorship.

Now there I think I disagree with you. Experience with Senegalese music inclines me to think that sponsorship is - or can be - a good thing.

Commercial sponsorship enabled the Senegalese music industry to beat pirates who were selling about 80% of all albums in Senegal in the 70s and early 80s, by reducing the price of K7s to a competitive level. I can't find on the web any examples of album sleeves actually containing adverts for products like Nescafe frappe, or Baralait (a baby milk formula), but I have them myself. The albums all contain a song praising their sponsored products. The music industry in Senegal would have been destroyed without this sponsorship. With it, the pirates have been driven out of the market.

Here's the website for the 20th St Louis Jazz Festival, sponsored by the government and about 40 firms whose logos appear at the bottom of the page. No well known American jazz musicians this year but past years have featured Parlan, Shepp, Lucky Petersen, Roy Haynes, Louis Sclavis, Randy Weston, Jack DeJohnette, McCoy Tyner and the Elite Swingsters.

MG

No doubt.

However, I've had experience with sponsorship of the type where the music is there just to pimp the sponsor and you're expected to act all....endorseful and shit b/c of your participation. Not happy when that happens.

No doubt you have. I think I said something relevant about you lot over there being different to us lot over here in the Americana thread. Take it as read :)

MG

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Diving off the speaker stacks.

Crowd-surfing an audience of four.

I can't think of a damned thing that I wouldn't rule out in any and all circumstances.

Did I hear you correctly...?

Heh heh.

Yeah, but obviously I didn't speak correctly... :lol:

Digipaks, especially the ones where the teeth are pre-broken.

Okay, I stand corrected. Good one.

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In most cases, strings and orchestras. They are nearly always arranged like Tchaikovsky when jazz is better arranged like Stravinsky or Bartok.

Would Focus be your Platonic example of the latter?

A while since I heard it. Seem to recall it being more 20thC in its approach.

**********

People at jazz concerts (or any concert) who seem to need to let everyone know they are there by shouting, whooping or whistling. But that's probably my British stiff upper lip talking.

Non US vocalists trying to sound native!

Non-English speaking vocalists singing in English (especially Brazilians). Sing in your own language. I like the mystery of being clueless about what you are saying.

Edited by A Lark Ascending
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People at jazz concerts (or any concert) who seem to need to let everyone know they are there by shouting, whooping or whistling. But that's probably my British stiff upper lip talking.

Non US vocalists trying to sound native!

Non-English speaking vocalists singing in English (especially Brazilians). Sing in your own language. I like the mystery of being clueless about what you are saying.

Even if they're making fun of all the stiff upper lips in the audience? :w

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People at jazz concerts (or any concert) who seem to need to let everyone know they are there by shouting, whooping or whistling. But that's probably my British stiff upper lip talking.

Non US vocalists trying to sound native!

Non-English speaking vocalists singing in English (especially Brazilians). Sing in your own language. I like the mystery of being clueless about what you are saying.

Even if they're making fun of all the stiff upper lips in the audience? :w

Can't understand them so they can be singing about what they like. Actually, it tends to be worse when the translate lyrics from the native language into English!

I'm sure Stacey Kent singing in French sounds awful to the French.

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