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Mark Stryker

Sonny Fortune R.I.P.

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Many reliable sources reporting on social media that Sonny Fortune has died at 79. These include his former manager Marty Khan, Todd Barkan and others. 

(Moderators can decide when it's appropriate to add the R.I.P. to the thread.)

Edited by Mark Stryker

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Seems to be the case. Never saw him live, unfortunately, but he was and is a master.

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He fit better into McCoy Tyner-led groups than any other saxophonist.  So many excellent players got eaten alive by Tyner's power in the 70's, but Fortune held his own.  Azar Lawrence also, but others like George Adams, Gary Bartz, and Joe Ford seemed to just get overwhelmed by Tyner's playing.

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RIP

 

indeed, he refused t0 be intimidted.

 

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This is real sad news to hear - his work on ‘Agharta’ impressed me first time I heard it, full of fire. Have followed his career with interest ever since.

Saw him a couple of times live - both occasions with Elvin Jones Jazz Machine. RIP and thanks.

Edited by sidewinder

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R-1253029-1234106387.jpeg.jpg

Both A&M Horizons are brilliant.

Edited by sidewinder

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Fortunate to have also heard him live several times. What a joy!

I think my first exposure was “Trip on the Strip” on Prestige with Stan Hunter. Then, like ao many others, he really hit me as a sideman on “Agharta” and  Charles Sullivan’s “Genesis” on Strata East ... and at that same time as a leader on “Awakening.”

I have returned many times to the “Great Friends” recording with Billy Harper, Stanley Cowell, Bill Hart and Reggie Workman. Loved and saw him twice during his final resurgence. Excellent playing and great music each time.

Personal sadness. 

Peace and blessings, Sonny. Thanks for the great music and memories.

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‘Trip on the Strip’ wasn’t his greatest but good that Dusty put it out, glad to have it

That Strata-East of his ‘Long Before Our Mothers Cried’ is a personal fave too. 

Edited by sidewinder

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Oh my God, I didn't think he was that old or sick. I think I recently heard an interview with him on KCR. 

Another of the great masters is gone. RIP Sonny...

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RIP. I wasn't wildly familiar with him but sad news.

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I heard Fortune with Tyner several times and agree that he was the best horn companion for McCoy. I also heard Fortune blow the roof with Nat Adderly-- a combo that is captured IIRC on two CDs.

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33 minutes ago, Larry Kart said:

I also heard Fortune blow the roof with Nat Adderly-- a combo that is captured IIRC on two CDs.

I don't know whether Fortune was the leader on any recordings with Nat Adderley, but per Wikipedia,

As sideman . . .

With Nat Adderley

    On the Move (Theresa, 1983)

    Blue Autumn (Theresa, 1985)

    Autumn Leaves (Sweet Basil, 1990 [1991])

    Work Song: Live at Sweet Basil (Sweet Basil, 1990 [1993])

(And apparently they all made it to CD.)

Edited by bluenoter

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1 hour ago, bluenoter said:

I don't know whether Fortune was the leader on any recordings with Nat Adderley, but per Wikipedia,

As sideman . . .

With Nat Adderley

    On the Move (Theresa, 1983)

    Blue Autumn (Theresa, 1985)

    Autumn Leaves (Sweet Basil, 1990 [1991])

    Work Song: Live at Sweet Basil (Sweet Basil, 1990 [1993])

(And apparently they all made it to CD.)

Good -- there are more than I recall. I need to hunt for the ones I don't have. The group's original rhythm section -- Larry Willis, Walter Booker, Jimmy Cobb -- was choice.

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When I saw the Coltrane Legacy band (McCoy, Elvin,  Reggie Workman), he was the standout.

RIP

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It seems like he should have had a bigger career than he did have.  Definitely some fine work with Tyner, as pointed out.  Sahara instantly comes to mind.

He also spent some time with Elvin.  It Don't Mean a Thing is a really good one, especially Sonny's incredibly moving performance of "A Change is Gonna Come." 

R.I.P.  

 

 

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R.I.P.

Sonny Fortune (ss, as, fl) on:

34186719xu.jpg

McCOY TYNER: SAHARA. MILESTONE MSP 9039 [1972]

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The only time I saw Sonny Fortune live was in duo with Rashied Ali. Intense stuff, and totally captivating. They were second act after Airto solo concert, and I remember Ali visibly and audibly dissatisfied with the state their shared drum set was after the opener when he got to tune up. I like Airto and all, but Fortune and Ali is what I remember that night for. Coincidentally, a little bit into the Fortune/Ali set, about third of the audience decided to stand up and storm out the concert hall, most of them women (don't women like real music?) The musical maelstrom of those two was apparently too much for many that night.

Been listening to quite a lot of Sonny Fortune lately, did listen to Aghartha/Pangaea show through headphones in my Osaka hotel room, lights out and drinking whiskey, thinking how this mighty display of collective genius happened just a mile from where I was at the moment.  RIP, Sonny Fortune.

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48 minutes ago, clifford_thornton said:

The cover photo on Sahara is intense!

beautiful cover and maybe my favorite jazz album.

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18 minutes ago, sambrasa said:

 (don't women like real music?)

Nope. Not one. It's chromosomal, you know.

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12 minutes ago, JSngry said:

Nope. Not one. It's chromosomal, you know.

That's correct — not one woman likes real music. I always thought it was hormonal, but that's just me, Rita.

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It's like real sports, right?

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1 hour ago, JSngry said:

It's like real sports, right?

Right. (I'll leave it at that.)

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