AllenLowe

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About AllenLowe

  • Rank
    Groovissimo!
  • Birthday 04/05/1954

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  • Website URL http://www.allenlowe.com
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  • Gender Male
  • Location Moonlight Bay

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  1. So, What Are You Listening To NOW?

    I knew Joe pretty well and saw him frequently - he even had a regular solo gig for a while at the top of the World Trade Center - also, he played at my wedding in 1982. I loved Joe, though he could be difficult, and he had these little gaps that caused him to get lost in the music from time to time. I still have some nice tapes of him playing solo. Funny, smart guy who just did too many drugs (he enjoyed telling me about the horse tranguilizer he took, and about sharing needles with Bird).
  2. Everything Sonny.

    was this AFTER Jim Hall had played with him? I ask because Sonny was getting political pressure not to play with a white guy.
  3. Eric Dolphy postcard.

    what low level of literacy? A spelling mistake; could be a minor learning disability (which commonly leads to these kind of spelling errors); yes, should be an, but still, hardly a "low level of literacy."
  4. Rock exploded in 1971?

    for me it was mainly the feeling that the bands I was looking at, as having illustrated the feeling of the '60s, pretty much did their best work by then. It doesn't mean I think that what came after wasn't worthwhile; it was just, to me, a different era.
  5. Rock exploded in 1971?

    I prefer the years 1954-1970, and actually wrote a book about it.
  6. NEA Jazz Masters - 2020

    Mabern? Too much of a basher for me, dull and repetitive. Kirk was an odd choice, because she occupies a category that fits about 1,000 people.
  7. we will freeze all of your musical assets until the project is completed. Inaction is the new Action.
  8. I am in the middle of mastering a new project with a book and 36 cds; working title: Appropriating Culture: How to Listen to American Music it will be a basic guide to the range of American vernacular music of the 20th century, approx. 1900-1960; it will go through country, jazz, blues, pop, ragtime, hillbilly, gospel, (some) Cajun, rhythm and blues, early rock and roll and its antecedents - I am offering a pre-sale price of $125, which includes the CDs and the book; I don't expect to be finished for about a year, and I don't want your money probably until sometime around September. These will be real cds (not cdrs); this is probably my last big project of this sort and I think we will break some new ground. So....right now I am only look for pledges, for commitments to support the box; you can tell me here or email me at allenlowe5@gmail.com thanks!
  9. Allison Miller's Boom Tic Boom - Glitter Wolf

    it's not as easy at it looks - well, maybe it is....
  10. Allison Miller's Boom Tic Boom - Glitter Wolf

    sorry I'm late: NAY
  11. well, I understand, but as someone who has done a fair amount of mastering and had it 'borrowed,' it kinda goes with the territory.
  12. yeah, but....it depends on what kind of remastering. That can mean a lot things, direct transfers, tape transfers, disc transfers, restorations, etc.
  13. "....a trio headed by the wonderful pianist Pony Poindexter."
  14. do we really think we owe RCA/Sony for a 90 year old recording that they are sitting on? Does Joe Blow's family get anything? My impression is that the PD label is only obligated to pay publishing.
  15. Steve, the weakness of your initial argument, "What I DID say was that if they did use somebody else's remastering then this is equivalent to a generics producer using the someone else's research work" is that everybody is using somebody else's mastering; the label is using the mastering done by someone who recorded it, the reissue blues and country label is using the mastering done by somebody in a hotel or recording studio 80 years ago; ESP just put out my stuff, and they used my mastering, though I in in turn used other people's mastering when recordings were done in other studios.