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The Five Albums That Changed the Way You Hear Music

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This was a thread on another message board (much more indie-rock based) and I found it an absolutely fascinating read. I'm sure many of you have some great examples as well. The basic point is to list and explain not your favorite albums, but the albums that changed your definition of music, or even maybe your definition of yourself or the world.

Try to stick to five, but I know I had a helluva time doing that.

1. The Doors - "Touch Me." Don't need no album here (Waiting for the Sun if you need to know, but I started with the Greatest Hits double disc.) One song was all it took, I heard the song playing on the radio coming from my sister's stereo one afternoon. I NEEDED to hear more. I when I finally did I understood for the first time, at 12 years old, what it actually meant to be alive. Zep, Beatles, Hendrix, a Guitar, Pink Floyd, and obsession with lyrics and rebellion, even the desire to read books all came from Jim Morrison and the Doors. This didn't change how I listen to music, this was the single most important event in my life. 2-5 is nothing compared to his.

2. Joe Satriani - Surfing with the Alien. Ok ok, so the album is cheesy, the music is lame, and no one needs to play that many notes. But it was part of my general approach to learning guitar and really excelling. I have played for about 12 years, and have been teaching for almost 8. I figure I've made a lot of money (and friends) off of this instrument. Joe helped me get there.

3. Radiohead - OK Computer. This album help me realized a few things about music. For one, living musicians were creating great songs (who knew?) Also, I was no longer interested in evolutionary or revolutionary music (in the sense of adding to the rock vocabulary), or people with great technical skills, or anything like that. I realized that innovation was frankly overrated and rock had become a language of personal expression. It was simply about saying who you were. No fancy chords, no fancy solos, no fancy lyrics. While all that is fine and dandy, it only mattered if it served the emotional expression. While Radiohead certainly wasn't the first band to do this, they did it very well, and it was the first album I fell in love with that helped me come to this realization. It might me THE key to my enjoyment of current rock music.

4. Miles Davis - Kind of Blue. Perhaps you have heard of it? Oddly enough, it wasn't even the album that did it. My guitar teacher taught me this nifty little chord progression called 'Freddie Freeloader.' Even though it was a very simple 12 bar blues with a twist, I couldn't stop playing it. I figured I might as well go out and buy it. And so begins jazz. The next two Miles discs I picked up were Bitches Brew and Sketches of Spain. Suffice to say this 17 year old was very very confused by this Miles Davis guy. But I loved all three of them. Bring on Bill Evans, and Cannonball, and Wes with Wynton Kelly's trio, and who is that guy on tenor??

5. John Coltrane - My Favorite Things. I don't even need a whole song on this one, I just need 10 seconds of Elvin Jones' opening cymbal hit and a few notes of Coltrane's soprano. Oh I knew I liked jazz, I just wasn't quite aware yet that it would be how I define my life. If the Doors made my brain what it is, Coltrane made my soul what it is.

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not really albums but also collections of music with less than 120 minutes playing time

- Charlie Parker - The Gold Collection (notably some Dial sides + a live recording of April in Paris with Kenny Dorham)

- Robert Wyatt - The early years, WDR5 radio show by Karsten Lippegaus (notably Kevin Ayers "Song for insane times", Syd Barrett "No good trying", excerpts from Soft Machine Vol II and "Memories" by the Wilde Flowers)

- Tony Fruscella "At the Open Door"

- Prince Lasha / Sonny Simmons "The Cry"

- Don Patterson "Boppin and Burnin"

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The various experiments of Markus Popp in the early 90s expanded the universe of sounds I could "connect to" in music. The first album I had was Oval's Systemische, so I suppose that goes in this thread.

I was never really into jazz until a friend made me a tape of Kind of Blue in high school, so I guess that is another.

The first music I loved was Black Sabbath back when I was literally four or five years old... it made me want to find out about more music like it and hence sort of started the musical odyssey I'm still on, so Paranoid (which I'm pretty sure was my first) would be another.

I had a "country is inherrently bad" bias until hearing Johnny Cash @ Folsom Prison.

I'm sort of embarrased to admit this now, but as I recall, rap (except for the Fat Boys, who I loved from elementary school) was very off-putting to me until Run-DMC's cover of Walk This Way came out (bear in mind that I was 11 in 1986), and from there I developed a library of probably well over 1000 hip hop albums. (The bulk of the record collecting aspect had to wait until I was old enough to work, but Walk This Way was probably the gateway.)

The other significant musical realization for me was in punk/"indie" music, but that was something I think I primarily got into through live shows at the Gilman in Berkeley.

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Not generally albums for me - I grew up at the end of the 78 era.

I'm in love again - Fats Domino

This was the first Rock & Roll I heard - 1956. I hated pop music in the early fifties - well, it was really the worst period for pop, I think. But when this came along - a friend had it and SANG it to me, first, later I heard it for myself - it made an immediate impact. This was PROPER MUSIC!!!!!

Rumble - Link Wray & the Wray Men

Last day of school term, someone would bring in a record player and others would bring in records. This was one of them. It wasn't a hit over here, it was more or less unknown. Nowadays, Link is revered as the inventor of the KERRRRAANNNGGGG guitar, for this recording, which was his first. Well, that's all very well, but to have heard this in the summer of '58, without knowing all the subsequent history! I still have the 78 of it.

http://www.linkwraylegend.com/

There goes my baby - The Drifters

I got my first record player at Christmas 1958. I'd just moved down to London and didn't know anyone - took a while to get into friends because we moved in London 3 times in six months. So I was reliant on the radio for new music. It was in 1959 that the BBC managed to kill off Rock & Roll. By the summer, I'd noticed that there was hardly any real R&R on the radio. So I decided that the way forward was to buy records I thought would be good without having the bother of trying to hear them first. On not very much evidence, I decided that, if I picked material recorded by Atlantic, I'd get good stuff. So I ordered this before it came out and picked it up on the day of release. When I got it home and played it, I didn't know what the FUCK I was listening to! I'd never heard any real Soul music before. I was totally grabbed by Ben E King's voice. But the arrangement, with a choir of double basses (Phil Spector's contribution, I understand) and the song - which didn't rhyme - were as powerful.

Three weeks later, I pre-ordered

What'd I say - Ray Charles

This had almost as big an impact as the Drifters' record - and in particular, it was an indication that it wasn't a one-off; there was a thing going on. From that point on, I was an R&B man. Still am.

Now a few albums

Good gracious - Lou Donaldson

My first encounter with Patton/Green/Dixon. I bought it pretty soon after I started earning enough to afford Blue Notes. It actually took a few months before I realised that this wasn't a lot like Jimmy Smith recordings and so on. I was doing the washing up and GG screamed at me during "The holy ghost".

Highlife today - Ambrose Campbell & his Emergent Music

I bought this in '67. I liked it a lot. Played it a lot. Eventually, I realised that the musicians weren't making this music for me; that I wasn't REALLY getting it. And it wasn't just because I didn't understand Yoruba. I realised that what I felt about this album applied equally to Otis Redding and Aretha Franklin. So I got rid of the LP and started trying to find out about what was underlying all this music I'd been buying. And eventually, this led me to African history and so on. And led me to Africa.

Sen sougnou sama - Ouza ack Njagamarees

This is complicated. I got this when it came out in late 1997. I was already a big fan of Ouza - whom I love as much as Grant Green. So this album didn't reveal anything musically new to me.

But it contains a song called "Tamboulaye", which is a love song to a terrorist organisation.

In Senegal, the Jola (abetted in a minor way by the Mandinke) of the Casamance region - south of The Gambia - had been running a terrorist campaign for about a decade, seeking independence from Senegal. Most of Senegal is Muslim. The Jola are animist: magic; animal sacrifice etc. There is nothing worse in the Muslim handbook of what to hate. But the Jola refuse to convert and have been allowed to retain their traditions.

Because the Jola are also heroes to the Senegalese. They did not stop fighting the French colonists until at least the 1940s - and possibly later. They are Anarchists; no authority higher than the village meeting is recognised. But Senegal's government is modeled on that of France and is highly centralised with almost no discretion to local authorities. In 1997 I spent a morning with the head of finance at the town hall of St Louis and was amazed at how little responsibility the council had - and how little money (even considering price differences) was allowed it by the Senegalese Govenment. It is very easy to see how such a centralised Government must chafe at the Jola. But, of course, not even the Senegalese Government is prepared to put up with Anarchism. Hence the terrorist activity in support of separatism.

Ouza's song says, "I love you. Don't leave me. I need your roots, I need your flowers, your animals, your traditions."

In Britain, we make jokes about how stupid the Irish are. In Northern Ireland, the Protestants make jokes about how stupid the Catholics are. And rant about the IRA. The local councils, many of which elect a majority of Catholics, are (or were; not sure if the law has changed) only responsible for graveyards, parks and playgrounds. No one ever sings them a love song.

Is anyone singing a love song to the Middle East?

MG

Edited by The Magnificent Goldberg

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Hey this looks like fun!

After some reflection. . . these:

A two LP set of Muddy Waters' early Chess sides. . . can't find a pick or remember the exact title. After a lot of British Blues and pop sides heard over the radio I managed to study these sides and discover raw real music.

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This opened my ears to a whole world of both meaningful messge music and deep deep groovy shit.

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Finding this lp in the library and playing it when I had just come back from Africa and was in a weird frame of mind opened up vast new vistas for me, ultimately leading me to Ellington and Parker by opening me up to the world of Miles and fusion.

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This lp made me suddenly and completely realize that Louis Armstrong was one of the greatest performers of the twentieth century and charmed me into a complete exploration of his work.

milesblackhawk12.jpg

This lp caused me to seek out the work of Wynton Kelly and Hank Mobley as sidemen and leaders and led me to hundreds of fantastic swinging recordings.

Edited by jazzbo

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Nice thread!

First up a 45 that I discovered as a 4 year old and was on my way to being a music fanatic.

The Beatles - Hey Jude/Revolution. I still remember being utterly fascinated by Hey Jude and the way that it kept building and building and building in intensity. Then there was that distorted guitar riff/scream at the beginning of Revolution, I immediately wanted to hear more.

American Graffiti Soundtrack. An album purchased as a "peace offering" by my Stepfather for my 5th birthday. We had NOTHING in common before this album...and it was also just about the last thing we ever had in common. I loved almost every minute of this. The first time I heard Wolfman Jack, he made quite an impression. My favorite tracks were: Ya Ya (Lee Dorsey), The Stroll (Diamonds), Ain't That A Shame (Fats Domino), I Only Have Eyes For You (Flamingos), Chantilly Lace (Big Bopper), Green Onions (Booker T).

Doobie Brothers - What Were Once Vices Are Now Habits

Another album I got at age 5. I heard "Black Water" on the radio and bugged my Mother until she took me to the store to buy it. The funky guitar riff in "Road Angel" inspired me to pick up an old tennis racket, hold it like a guitar and ROCK OUT! (this track still has me looking for that tennis racket).

Pink Floyd - Dark Side Of The Moon

The first album that literally transported me to a better place (away from stepfathers, school bullies, etc). Started a love affair with progressive rock that continues to this day.

Iron Maiden - The Number Of The Beast/Metallica - Kill 'em All (tie) - These two albums inspired me to run out and buy a bass guitar (and then switch to guitar a few years later). Metal dominated my listening for the next 10 years.

John Coltrane - Blue Train

The first jazz CD that I absolutely HAD to purchase as soon as I heard it in a record store. I remember playing it over and over and over for an entire weekend...and then running back to the store to find more albums that inspired me to the same degree.

Miles Davis - Workin' With The Miles Davis Quintet

This was my first Miles purchase and started me off on a hunt for as much Miles as I could get..and Coltrane, Red Garland, Paul Chambers..etc..etc.

Edited by Shawn

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Iron Maiden - The Number Of The Beast/Metallica - Kill 'em All (tie) - These two albums inspired me to run out and buy a bass guitar (and then switch to guitar a few years later). Metal dominated my listening for the next 10 years.

I don't think I've ever gotten Jump in the Fire out of my head. I remember Metallica as a local group. I loved this stuff as a kid.

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The first album I remember really loving was Beatles 65. I later came to regard Revolver as the Beatles' peak, so both of those albums would be on my list.

In high school, I fell in love with Pink Floyd and The Who. Dark Side of the Moon and Who's Next would also have to be on the list.

When I got into jazz, the album that made it all click for me was The Best of Horace Silver, v.2.

I could list many, many others. Elvis Costello, Hendrix, Johnny Cash, Miles, Trane, The White Stripes...but we're only allowed five choices...

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Not generally albums for me - I grew up at the end of the 78 era.

I'm in love again - Fats Domino

This was the first Rock & Roll I heard - 1956. I hated pop music in the early fifties - well, it was really the worst period for pop, I think. But when this came along - a friend had it and SANG it to me, first, later I heard it for myself - it made an immediate impact. This was PROPER MUSIC!!!!!

MG

Wasn't the flips side My Blue Heaven? IIRC it also got a lot of airplay.

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Not generally albums for me - I grew up at the end of the 78 era.

I'm in love again - Fats Domino

This was the first Rock & Roll I heard - 1956. I hated pop music in the early fifties - well, it was really the worst period for pop, I think. But when this came along - a friend had it and SANG it to me, first, later I heard it for myself - it made an immediate impact. This was PROPER MUSIC!!!!!

MG

Wasn't the flips side My Blue Heaven? IIRC it also got a lot of airplay.

Yes, it was . It was a double-sided hit in the US. I don't know if it was a hit over here. I hadn't started watching the charts at that stage.

MG

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In no particular order...

Sonic Youth - Daydream Nation - (Blast First!) I had never heard raging, psychedelically beautiful dissonances over such a swinging rhythm section before picking this up in high school. I went backwards from Goo and when I got to this one (pretty quickly), it was a huge door opening for me. Granted, in fifteen years of listening to this band, some of their other works have eclipsed this one, but for me it starts here. By way of SY, I got into things like This Heat, Branca/Chatham, Spacemen, and I'd say it led me to immediately appreciate things like Ayler, Cecil and Ornette.

Eric Dolphy - Out To Lunch - (Blue Note) Among the first jazz records I bought, what really struck me was the compositional framework applied to such freedom, and as I had just begun to really latch onto what "space" is all about, musically, the way space was used between Hutch, Tony and Davis was really something. A lot of those inside/outside Blue Notes are great - Hill(e), Moncur, Rivers - but this one was a real eye-opener. Maybe because of the song "Hat and Beard," I began to get really into Monk as well because of what I found to be a similar approach to space and rhythm. Kind of like how Monk opened the door for Lacy, Eric's music - and this record in particular - opened the door for me in both directions.

Albert Ayler - Bells - (ESP) Another early jazz acquisition, this IMMEDIATELY hit me - I'd never heard anything with such jubilant power before. I liked the energy of noisier punk/"grunge" (not ashamed to use the term - I was barely a teenager when punk "broke") and craved collective improvisation before I'd ever heard it in a jazz context. Though there were thematic signposts, which at the time just seemed like pure joy - the playing of the Aylers and Charles Tyler on this one was pure ecstasy, exploding lights and sounds and smells all around me... and the way Sunny Murray played all-of-time just sent me over the edge, leading to an immediate quest to find every Murray and Ayler record I could find. Mostly, I was not disappointed!

NWA - Straight Outta Compton - (Priority) The first time I heard this, I was in grade school, and I of course liked hearing lots of bad words in music. When I actually went out and bought this on cassette a couple of years later, sure, there was an attraction of cursing, but in hindsight what also attracted me was that the lyrics painted a picture of something I didn't experience. The idea was that music and art could not only reflect one's experience, but also offer a window onto humanity and the experiences of one's fellow beings, hopefully bringing about an attitude of "change." Now, this is totally looking back in hindsight on something I bought because it was a) taboo and b) pissed off, but I think it opened my ears quite a bit as well.

John Fahey - The Yellow Princess - (Vanguard) Okay, so I actually bought Live in Tasmania as my first Fahey record, and subsequently have gotten an assload of great listening in with the Takomas (not to mention Kottke, Basho and the crew), but I would say that Fahey led me down the trail of appreciating American traditional and folk music and being able to unlock some of the secrets within things as divers as Charley Patton, Mississippi John, Tampa Red and Sloppy Henry. Fahey co-opted a lot of the good shit, blending it with Indian music and his own semi-irritating mythology, and I tend to think half or more of the time he was aesthetically full of it, but the fact remains that I probably would've been less likely to explore the Arhoolie, Yazoo and Old Tramp catalogs without a few Takomas in my ear.

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"you'll fuckin' shit," as Miles told Ralph J. Gleason about the first Laura Nyro album.

:lol:

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Thomas Dolby ~ Golden Age of the Wireless.

This was the first album I bought that was out of the Steve Miller, Aerosmith, Kansas type of music that my older brother listened to. From here I went on to listen to a lot of mid-to-late 80’s British pop, rock, goth, ska… At this same time I started going to some of the underage dance clubs in Seattle. I have many great memories of my friends from that time and dancing as the mind-numbing volume and non-stop dancing would almost have a trance like effect. In high school music was at the core of my social world.

David Bowie ~ Heroes

Heroes and Low were some of the first records I became completely obsessed with. I wore out a couple copies each on cassette before getting the lp’s and then eventually the cd’s. Now I’m back to lp copies. For whatever reason these sides never get old to me.

Thelonious Monk ~ Standards

I friend in college made me a tape of this and I was mesmerized. It just sounded so wrong and off yet completely together at the same time. I knew there was something about jazz that I was attracted to, but it took me a while to find it.

Jimmy Giuffre ~ The Jimmy Giuffre Clarinet

For me this is some of the most intimate honest and beautiful music I have ever heard. Exploring his music has opened my ears to every thing from “free jazz” to big band.

#5 tbd.

I am hoping to find the classical cd/lp that flips the switch and opens that world for me.

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Miles Davis: Round About Midnight

Ornette Coleman: The Shape Of Jazz To Come

Errol Garner: Concert By The Sea

Sonny Rollins: Saxophone Colossus

Thelonious Monk: Brilliant Corners

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I'll give it a go.

1. Albert Ayler-Spiritual Unity

2. Ornette Coleman-This is Our Music

3. Peter Brotzmann-Machine Gun

4. Andrew Hill-Judgment!

5. Eric Dolphy-Out to Lunch!

There are many others, but these particular albums are the ones that made me think differently about the music.

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J. Larsen: you had 1000 hip-hop sides?! Q: have you heard Nas "Where Are They Now" from Hip Hop Is Dead? if somehow the answer is no, do so posthaste. "you'll fuckin' shit," as Miles told Ralph J. Gleason about the first Laura Nyro album.

Haven't heard it. Honestly, Nas lost me after the first record. But I'll check it out online.

But yeah, I have at least 1000 hip hop lps and 12"s. They fill an entire not-very-small closet. Probably my favorite semi-obscure record in my collection is the Jugganots album. But I've got a bunch of good original 80s and 90s sides. I used to have an even more expansive collection of early 80s - early 90s punk/"indie", but I sold it off through the back pages of MRR in the pre-ebay days to finance my college education.

Edited by J Larsen

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The Beatles - Meet The Beatles (my first rock 'n' roll record)

The Ventures - Walk Don't Run, Vol. 2 (my first rock instrumental album)

Richard "Groove" Holmes - Soul Message (my first hard core jazz record)

Mark Murphy - That's How I Love the Blues (my first vocalese record)

Caravan - In the Land of Grey and Pink (my first prog rock record)

edit to correct Ventures title

Edited by GA Russell

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Another Green World---Brian Eno

Music for 18 Musicians---Steve Reich

The Velvet Underground & Nico---1st VU album

There's A Riot Goin' On---Sly and the Family Stone

Kind of Blue---Miles Davis

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Some of you are cheating, you have to explain why too!

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I won't explain either... I don't think in terms of albums, really - rather it's a constant process. And I couldn't name five, the following list is just a small part:

Miles Davis - Cookin' (first jazz album I really dug - there's the explanation)

Coltrane - Ascension

Mingus - Ah Um

Dolphy - Out to Lunch

Miles - Bitches Brew

Hendrix - Band of Gypsies

Brötzmann/Drake - Dried Rat

Charlie Parker - the complete Savoy 5LP set

Lester Young - each and every side I ever heard

Billie w/Lester (all of it, too!)

Miles - Isle of Wight DVD

Ray Charles - The Great Ray Charles

Terry Riley - in C (LP dub on tape, no idea what recording it was... an old one, for sure)

Archie Shepp - In San Francisco

Ayler - probably not Spritual Unity... Hilversum Session? who cares... AYLER!

Jimmie Lunceford - some of the Decca sides (thanks to brownie I've got the whole run of Lunceford's MoJs now!)

Andrew Hill - the Mosaic set (no particular session, the twin basses & Hutch quartets, the KD/Dolphy/Joe Hen session... all of it!)

Tristano/Konitz/Marsh - the Mosaic set (maybe except the Konitz sides, I knew Lee before from the effin' great "Motion")

As I said, a very incomplete list... and concerts witnessed might have had even a greater influence, in the end anyway!

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a bunch I forgot:

CT - Nefertiti (the Revenant 2CD set!)

Charles Mingus - Presents

Charles Mingus - Black Saint & the Sinner Lady

Charles Mingus - the April 1964 concerts

Max Roach - Freedom Now Suite

Sonny Rollins - Saxophone Colossus

Monk - the BN box

Bud - the BN box

Herbie Nichols - the BN box

Bill Evans - Portrait in Jazz

Coltrane - anything, anytime, anywhere!

All of these influenced my way of listening to music and keep influencing it... most recent experience: I *finally* dug Wilbur Ware's greatness when playing Griffin's "Way Out" a few days ago, for the first time! So now I'll have to revisit the Rollins Vanguard sides and maybe after that they'll make the list, too...

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It's difficult selecting only five because my evolutionary process encompassed more than five milestone recordings, plus I don't recall the titles.

Something or other by Glenn Miller

ARTISTRY IN RHYTHM[or an album containing it]--Stan Kenton

Something or other by Count Basie

LIVE AT BIRDLAND--Maynard Ferguson

Something or other by John Coltrane

MINGUS PRESENTS MINGUS

Edited by MoGrubb

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not really albums but also collections of music with less than 120 minutes playing time

- Charlie Parker - The Gold Collection (notably some Dial sides + a live recording of April in Paris with Kenny Dorham)

- Robert Wyatt - The early years, WDR5 radio show by Karsten Lippegaus (notably Kevin Ayers "Song for insane times", Syd Barrett "No good trying", excerpts from Soft Machine Vol II and "Memories" by the Wilde Flowers)

- Tony Fruscella "At the Open Door"

- Prince Lasha / Sonny Simmons "The Cry"

- Don Patterson "Boppin and Burnin"

some explanation:

- Charlie Parker - The Gold Collection (notably some Dial sides + a live recording of April in Paris with Kenny Dorham)

i don't really know why but - when i was 14 - having listened to some older Jazz (Benny Goodman 16 Most Requested Songs and Duke Ellington 1927-1931 or so; i had hardly listened to any music before) and having read Joachim Ernst Berendts Jazzbuch i wanted to figure out what this Modern Jazz thing was about so i got this two CD collection and didn't get it at all at first but after four or five listens i figured out that you have to listen to Bebop in a way that the music enters your had right in the middle between your eyes and then it started to make sense (today i can enjoy Charlie Parker without this additional technique, actually, i have forgotten how to do it); and my first exposure to KD was important, although I didn't follow that at the time (because I got Horace Silver and The Jazz Messengers and didn't really like it at the time)

- Robert Wyatt - The early years, WDR5 radio show by Karsten Lippegaus (notably Kevin Ayers "Song for insane times", Syd Barrett "No good trying", excerpts from Soft Machine Vol II and "Memories" by the Wilde Flowers)

like three years later, after i had listened to quite a lot of jazz (Horace Silver's Song for My Father was very important for instance) i recorded this radio show, i was somewhat familiar with Soft Machine because my father had an LP of Vol II (as one of his 6 LPs) which i had checked out earlier, but this time it really clicked [actually my father was at the hospital at that time and for the first time since 1972 (marriage) listened to a lot of music again; i gave him Mingus which he liked a lot and that tape, don't know whether he listened to it; note to Berigan: it had all started with a swollen foot and he was dead a few weeks later]; somehow this tape, especially the Ayers Song which is still maybe my favorite song, started my interest in songwriting, i started writing lyrics and asked a friend about starting a first band...; i then listened to more rock music until i was about 24, especially after i started doing mathematics, because i found out stuff like Pretty Things or Tommorow was a perfect sound track for that, i can't sit still without music for long enough...), also i guess finding out that i would never be able to play saxophone in a decent way may have diminished my interest in jazz for some time - silly as this may be

maybe more on the other three at a later time

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Donald Byrd; Byrd's Eye View

Sun Ra; Heliocentric Worlds Vol 1

Archie Shepp; Four For Trane

Cecil Taylor; Air

David Murray; Flowers For Albert

These are the really important ones that opened my ears. Near misses are Mingus Ah Um; Bird and Diz- Quintet of the Year; MIles Davis -Milestones and Tadd Dameron's Mating Call.

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