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Christiern

Trombonist Jimmy Cleveland has passed

21 posts in this topic

More to come on this sad news.

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Edited by Christiern

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His Wikipedia entry says he passed away 4 pm on the 23rd. No source given.

A very fine trombonist indeed.

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damn - one of my favorites - I didn't even know he was still alive -

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He made so many nice records, especially in the '50s and early '60s -- under his own name, with Lucky Thompson, Seldon Powell, Quincy Jones' "This Is How I Feel About Jazz," a gorgeous "If You Could See Me Now" on "Gil Evans And Ten," and "Ballad of the Sad Young Men" on Gil's second Pacific Jazz album. Lord knows he was quick, and usually inventive-quick, but he got me to most on ballads, had a lovely, hauntingly diffuse tone on them, as though he were playing into a beret. There was a long interesting interview with Cleveland in Cadence a few years back.

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The "who left us in 2008" list keeps getting longer.

RIP :(

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damn - one of my favorites - I didn't even know he was still alive -

He made so many nice records, especially in the '50s and early '60s -- under his own name, with Lucky Thompson, Seldon Powell, Quincy Jones' "This Is How I Feel About Jazz," a gorgeous "If You Could See Me Now" on "Gil Evans And Ten," and "Ballad of the Sad Young Men" on Gil's second Pacific Jazz album. Lord knows he was quick, and usually inventive-quick, but he got me to most on ballads, had a lovely, hauntingly diffuse tone on them, as though he were playing into a beret. There was a long interesting interview with Cleveland in Cadence a few years back.

What Allen and Larry said.

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Very sad news - such unbelievable fluency in the upper register and one of the very best tones around (which Gil Evans, Quincy Jones, Tadd Dameron etc. all recognised and made much use of on record). RIP :(

Probably the 'best sounding' jazz trombonist of them all, in my personal opinion. Still playing around 1998/99 at least - I'm sure he was in a trombone section I saw back then.

Edited by sidewinder

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Very sad news, a superb player and one of my favourites.

I'll spin some of his Emarcys later.

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damn - one of my favorites - I didn't even know he was still alive -

He made so many nice records, especially in the '50s and early '60s -- under his own name, with Lucky Thompson, Seldon Powell, Quincy Jones' "This Is How I Feel About Jazz," a gorgeous "If You Could See Me Now" on "Gil Evans And Ten," and "Ballad of the Sad Young Men" on Gil's second Pacific Jazz album. Lord knows he was quick, and usually inventive-quick, but he got me to most on ballads, had a lovely, hauntingly diffuse tone on them, as though he were playing into a beret. There was a long interesting interview with Cleveland in Cadence a few years back.

What Allen and Larry said.

Agree too.

R.I.P.

BTW, wouldn't this thread have a better place in the "Artists" section??

Edited by Big Beat Steve

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yes, I'm with Larry - I also considered him to be light years ahead of JJ Johnson in feeling - and yes, also, great Cadence interview which I have in a file somewhere -

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First heard him on that Sonny Period/EverestArchive side, took a few years to find out who it was, but yeah, none of the other "hyper fluent" trombonists of the era ever hit me like Cleveland did. He just had that thing. Or at least the version of it that I felt the most. Well, ok, Knepper did, but I don't think that's the same thing, strictly speaking in trombone terms.

Can't be sad about this though. Guy played his ass of for decades, afaik didn't end up destitute or anything, and then he died. The last thing is something we all gonna do, not so the first two. So Hip hip HOORAY for Jimmy M-F-in' CLEVELAND, y'all, who won at life. Save the tears for those who didn't, don't, and won't.

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I always liked Jimmy Cleveland's playing. I recall buying his 4 LPs on Emarcy/Mercury when they were first issued. Now have all that material on a 2 CD set on Lonehill.

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Sad news indeed - he was the only one among those extremely "hyper fluent" (as Jim called it) trombonists that ever moved me, because he had so much feeling and soul at the same time. He was really the top trombonist on the New York scene in the late 1950's when he recorded his first album, and all those excellent sessions with Lucky and Quincy - these are highly recommended. He made a good living in the studios, I understand, but could have recorded a jazz session more often than he did after 1960.

R.I.P.

Edited by mikeweil

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"Stardust" on Johnny Hodges with Billy Strayhorn and THE Orchestra

Clark Terry's self-titled Emarcy album

The opening notes of Jobim's "Desafinado" from The Composer of Desafinado Plays

And that's just the tip. What wonderful playing he did bestow upon us. Thanks Jimmy. RIP.

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Such a marvellous musician.

Great tone. Wonderful technique.

So sad.

Denis

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Very sad to hear of his passing.

He was an amazing player- he added so much spirit and taste to the many sessions in which he participated. "Hyperfluent" -what a great way to describe his playing, Sangrey!

I had the opportunity to meet and hang with him at a trombone conference in the early 80s. We went out to dinner- what a kind and generous person he was to spend so much time with a young novice like me! I always will remember that hang fondly. I wish he had continued to record later in his life, but I'm glad there is so much great music by Jimmy Cleveland to enjoy.

Truly distinctive and unique voices don't come along all that often, and he was one of a kind. And it's heartening to read that he was appreciated by so many here.

Rest in Peace

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First heard him on that Sonny Period/EverestArchive side, took a few years to find out who it was, but yeah, none of the other "hyper fluent" trombonists of the era ever hit me like Cleveland did. He just had that thing. Or at least the version of it that I felt the most. Well, ok, Knepper did, but I don't think that's the same thing, strictly speaking in trombone terms.

Can't be sad about this though. Guy played his ass of for decades, afaik didn't end up destitute or anything, and then he died. The last thing is something we all gonna do, not so the first two. So Hip hip HOORAY for Jimmy M-F-in' CLEVELAND, y'all, who won at life. Save the tears for those who didn't, don't, and won't.

Good point Jim.

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He made so many nice records, especially in the '50s and early '60s -- under his own name, with Lucky Thompson, Seldon Powell, Quincy Jones' "This Is How I Feel About Jazz," a gorgeous "If You Could See Me Now" on "Gil Evans And Ten," and "Ballad of the Sad Young Men" on Gil's second Pacific Jazz album. Lord knows he was quick, and usually inventive-quick, but he got me to most on ballads, had a lovely, hauntingly diffuse tone on them, as though he were playing into a beret. There was a long interesting interview with Cleveland in Cadence a few years back.

Thanks Larry for pointing out Cleveland's solo on "Ballad..." I just dug out it and spun it, very beautiful.

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